Number of Philippine Nurses Emigrating Skyrockets - page 2

The Philippines exports 15,000 nurses a year, and it's estimated that 1 in 10 Filipinos now works abroad. The nursing drain could have a crippling effect on the Philippines healthcare system. ... Read More

  1. by   Rep
    Foreign nurses whether under working or immigrant visas pay their taxes correctly. The US government does not discriminate when it comes to paying taxes.

    Quote from tommyw1016
    I believe that if the USA needs nurses so badly that we provide tax deferments to nurses who come from other countries for five years of tax free income. "They don't have to pay taxes, can bank or send their money back home." The American nurses who are citizens of the good old USA must pay their fair share of taxes to help keep the country afloat and make payments on student loans. It isn't fair! If you work in the USA and earn an income you need to be required to pay taxes too. Let's give all American nurses a tax break too; then we Americans could concentrate on saving all of our money also. We could also make nursing an attractive professional as it was once perceived, by providing educational incentatives to American students and end the slave labor imposed on nurses in our health care institutions. Nursing homes sometimes force one nurse to care for 50 and at times 70+ residents. They then write the nurses up for missing a blood sugar. These nursing home don't believe that mistakes of this type are system problems that place nurses in harms (litigation) way.They view them as nursing errors. Nurses must not only become more proactive in protecting their nursing licience, but also in in preventing these health care facilities being run by DON'S from countries outside of the USA, where workers have limited to no rights, attempting to impose these violations of human rights on American nurses. tommyw1016
  2. by   jstampi
    You got to see both sides of the fences to appreciate the complexity of this issue...Overall, I think no one is unfairly treated on purpose with regards to this issue. Its mainly a course for survival and dynamics of global economy.
  3. by   kbuds
    Quote from lee1
    Look why Millions of US dollars are going for aid to the Phillipines at a time they are exporting their best and brightest.

    http://www.usaid.gov/policy/budget/c...s_cbj_fy05.pdf
    ******************

    Hello, I'm a nurse but I'm also a Filipino citizen. It feels like I'm entering a lion's den with <Rep> and <Rkm> right now but I'd like to speak out.

    The U.S. government does'nt give us THAT much money, to deserve your
    unkind comments. As simply as I can put it, so much money came in as investments from the U.S. and the industrialized nations through the years so we could develop our industries for foreign markets, but these loans accumulated a huge amount of interest. Production somehow didn't take off, because the very high tariffs imposed on our goods by these same western countries made us uncompetetive. A substantial portion of our GNP goes to the payment of these loans, and as of this point we could hardly cope with the interest payments. Our foreign debt keeps rising every year!

    So here's our situation right as I see it, in sequence:

    1>Economic instability....
    2>So little jobs available...
    3>So many unemployed people..., depressed wages
    (Nurses here make the equivalent of about US$6.50 a day. So most of our
    nursing students dream not of staying, but of working abroad...)
    4>Rebellion by muslim or communist factions who think they would do better
    on their own...
    5>Only about 15 % or so pay taxes because people in general think the
    money would be stolen by corrupt government officials...or worst there
    is'nt any money left to pay the taxes because of #2 and #3.

    6>Because of insufficient funds the government is increasingly unable
    to repair the whole situation.

    7>Dead end.

    But we still nurture hope...and so, because it turned out that there is a continuing demand for our local skills overseas, people made individual decisions to leave their families to find work abroad. Or maybe it's our peculiar mindset. So what's wrong about fighting for our families' survival? By working abroad we solve numbers #(2) and #(3) of the above. And perhaps we could offer a better alternative to those leaning in favor of option # (4), and the money we send home also will include taxes to help support our government #(5), so it could deal with #(6) and undo #(7).

    As professional nurses in our host countries we try to provide the best nursing care to our patients, as the poet Robert Frost might put it, "whatever good I may do, let me do it now, because I will not pass this way again". Because I was invited by a kind American employer, I look forward to working in the U.S. too and will do just that, my colleague. But I will always look back to the Philippines as my dear homeland and pray that someday our future generations would be better off because of the sacrifices we make right now. And, in that distant future, if we do need foreign workers, we will welcome them as guests, as part of our tradition.

    Enough said.
    Last edit by kbuds on Feb 7, '05 : Reason: Typos
  4. by   blu_nurse
    Quote from brian
    The Philippines exports 15,000 nurses a year, and it's estimated that 1 in 10 Filipinos now works abroad. The nursing drain could have a crippling effect on the Philippines healthcare system.

    Listen to this radio segment on NPR at:
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...sourceCode=RSS
    Dont worry our health department are doing their job, so i think its not your job to be problematic on that..hehe.. just do your job as taking care patient.
  5. by   ethelbsnrn
    tommyw1016,

    Where did you get the idea that Filipino nurses in USA don't pay taxes? We pay our dues promptly....the bad thing is we are not allowed to vote. Isn't that unfair? We must at least have the right to choose on who will decide to use our tax money . But, who says life is fair?


    [QUOTE=tommyw1016]
    Quote from tommyw1016
    "I believe that if the USA needs nurses so badly that we provide tax deferments to nurses who come from other countries for five years of tax free income. "They don't have to pay taxes, can bank or send their money back home." The American nurses who are citizens of the good old USA must pay their fair share of taxes to help keep the country afloat and make payments on student loans. It isn't fair! If you work in the USA and earn an income you need to be required to pay taxes too. Let's give all American nurses a tax break too; then we Americans could concentrate on saving all of our money also. We could also make nursing an attractive professional as it was once perceived, by providing educational incentatives to American students and end the slave labor imposed on nurses in our health care institutions. Nursing homes sometimes force one nurse to care for 50 and at times 70+ residents. They then write the nurses up for missing a blood sugar. These nursing home don't believe that mistakes of this type are system problems that place nurses in harms (litigation) way.They view them as nursing errors. Nurses must not only become more proactive in protecting their nursing licience, but also in in preventing these health care facilities being run by DON'S from countries outside of the USA, where workers have limited to no rights, attempting to impose these violations of human rights on American nurses. tommyw1016"
  6. by   Rep
    You said it right!

    Quote from kbuds
    ******************

    Hello, I'm a nurse but I'm also a Filipino citizen. It feels like I'm entering a lion's den with <Rep> and <Rkm> right now but I'd like to speak out.

    The U.S. government does'nt give us THAT much money, to deserve your
    unkind comments. As simply as I can put it, so much money came in as investments from the U.S. and the industrialized nations through the years so we could develop our industries for foreign markets, but these loans accumulated a huge amount of interest. Production somehow didn't take off, because the very high tariffs imposed on our goods by these same western countries made us uncompetetive. A substantial portion of our GNP goes to the payment of these loans, and as of this point we could hardly cope with the interest payments. Our foreign debt keeps rising every year!

    So here's our situation right as I see it, in sequence:

    1>Economic instability....
    2>So little jobs available...
    3>So many unemployed people..., depressed wages
    (Nurses here make the equivalent of about US$6.50 a day. So most of our
    nursing students dream not of staying, but of working abroad...)
    4>Rebellion by muslim or communist factions who think they would do better
    on their own...
    5>Only about 15 % or so pay taxes because people in general think the
    money would be stolen by corrupt government officials...or worst there
    is'nt any money left to pay the taxes because of #2 and #3.

    6>Because of insufficient funds the government is increasingly unable
    to repair the whole situation.

    7>Dead end.

    But we still nurture hope...and so, because it turned out that there is a continuing demand for our local skills overseas, people made individual decisions to leave their families to find work abroad. Or maybe it's our peculiar mindset. So what's wrong about fighting for our families' survival? By working abroad we solve numbers #(2) and #(3) of the above. And perhaps we could offer a better alternative to those leaning in favor of option # (4), and the money we send home also will include taxes to help support our government #(5), so it could deal with #(6) and undo #(7).

    As professional nurses in our host countries we try to provide the best nursing care to our patients, as the poet Robert Frost might put it, "whatever good I may do, let me do it now, because I will not pass this way again". Because I was invited by a kind American employer, I look forward to working in the U.S. too and will do just that, my colleague. But I will always look back to the Philippines as my dear homeland and pray that someday our future generations would be better off because of the sacrifices we make right now. And, in that distant future, if we do need foreign workers, we will welcome them as guests, as part of our tradition.

    Enough said.
  7. by   Rep
    Hospitality we have.

    Quote from kbuds
    ******************


    As professional nurses in our host countries we try to provide the best nursing care to our patients, as the poet Robert Frost might put it, "whatever good I may do, let me do it now, because I will not pass this way again". Because I was invited by a kind American employer, I look forward to working in the U.S. too and will do just that, my colleague. But I will always look back to the Philippines as my dear homeland and pray that someday our future generations would be better off because of the sacrifices we make right now. And, in that distant future, if we do need foreign workers, we will welcome them as guests, as part of our tradition.

    Enough said.
  8. by   lee1
    Where did you get the idea that Filipino nurses in USA don't pay taxes? We pay our dues promptly....the bad thing is we are not allowed to vote. Isn't that unfair? We must at least have the right to choose on who will decide to use our tax money . But, who says life is fair?
    My own husband came from a European country and only after many years did he become a USA citizen. Always paid his taxes from the get go. Got to vote AFTER becoming USA citizen.
    Read the US gov. site to see how many millions were allotted to the Phillipines. It is there in black and white
    HMMMM---wonder which countries send us (USA) money to help us with our problems???
  9. by   Rep
    Developed countries do not need money from other countries. They can imposed anything to served their interest.

    Let me tell you one thing. Before the US gave the Philippines independence, they told the Philippine government to sign a trade treaty called the "Parity Act" as a condition. This treaty gave any American equal rights as that of Filipinos to use our natutral resources and not to pay tarriffs or import duties. Yes, our mountains were stripped bared. Our gold mines were empty because of this treaty. What do we get from it? Financial donations?

    We are in this mess not only because of our inept government but also of powerful nations like the US.

    Quote from lee1
    Read the US gov. site to see how many millions were allotted to the Phillipines. It is there in black and white
    HMMMM---wonder which countries send us (USA) money to help us with our problems???
  10. by   annasol06
    e schools are nursing schools and the philippine nurses are always in demand in UK, UAE, CANADA and others because they are bright, industrious and very easy to adapt in any country they are placed in
    Quote from NurseFirst
    Why won't there ever be a shortage of nurses or doctors in the Phillipines?

    thanks,
    [img]images/smilies/smile.gif[/img]
    NurseFirst
  11. by   LadyBugRN
    Quote from kbuds
    ******************

    Hello, I'm a nurse but I'm also a Filipino citizen. It feels like I'm entering a lion's den with <Rep> and <Rkm> right now but I'd like to speak out.

    The U.S. government does'nt give us THAT much money, to deserve your
    unkind comments. As simply as I can put it, so much money came in as investments from the U.S. and the industrialized nations through the years so we could develop our industries for foreign markets, but these loans accumulated a huge amount of interest. Production somehow didn't take off, because the very high tariffs imposed on our goods by these same western countries made us uncompetetive. A substantial portion of our GNP goes to the payment of these loans, and as of this point we could hardly cope with the interest payments. Our foreign debt keeps rising every year!

    So here's our situation right as I see it, in sequence:

    1>Economic instability....
    2>So little jobs available...
    3>So many unemployed people..., depressed wages
    (Nurses here make the equivalent of about US$6.50 a day. So most of our
    nursing students dream not of staying, but of working abroad...)
    4>Rebellion by muslim or communist factions who think they would do better
    on their own...
    5>Only about 15 % or so pay taxes because people in general think the
    money would be stolen by corrupt government officials...or worst there
    is'nt any money left to pay the taxes because of #2 and #3.

    6>Because of insufficient funds the government is increasingly unable
    to repair the whole situation.

    7>Dead end.

    But we still nurture hope...and so, because it turned out that there is a continuing demand for our local skills overseas, people made individual decisions to leave their families to find work abroad. Or maybe it's our peculiar mindset. So what's wrong about fighting for our families' survival? By working abroad we solve numbers #(2) and #(3) of the above. And perhaps we could offer a better alternative to those leaning in favor of option # (4), and the money we send home also will include taxes to help support our government #(5), so it could deal with #(6) and undo #(7).

    As professional nurses in our host countries we try to provide the best nursing care to our patients, as the poet Robert Frost might put it, "whatever good I may do, let me do it now, because I will not pass this way again". Because I was invited by a kind American employer, I look forward to working in the U.S. too and will do just that, my colleague. But I will always look back to the Philippines as my dear homeland and pray that someday our future generations would be better off because of the sacrifices we make right now. And, in that distant future, if we do need foreign workers, we will welcome them as guests, as part of our tradition.

    Enough said.

    Thank you for speaking out. Well said. Looking forward to working with you here in America. Best of luck to you. God bless you and your loved ones.
  12. by   oramar
    Quote from lee1
    Look why Millions of US dollars are going for aid to the Phillipines at a time they are exporting their best and brightest.

    http://www.usaid.gov/policy/budget/c...s_cbj_fy05.pdf
    That is darned interesting.
  13. by   jayrelic
    My take on things -

    More foreign nurses will lead us down a very dangerous path. You need look no further than technology.

    Technology jobs were outsourced overseas to places where folks earn pennies on the dollar vs. American salaries. What did that do to those who worked in technology in the US - I think we're all in tune enough to know that tens (dare I say 100's) of thousands of Americans found themself out of a job as a result of the willingness of CEO's to outsource those jobs to foreign countries.

    Now we all realize that you can't send sick patients overseas to be treated. So what do you do? Well, you start hiring foreign nurses for quarters on the dollar (it's healthcare, so they are willing to pay .25c vs .01c for the help).

    Let's face it - most (notice I did not say all as there are countries of exception) foreign nurses can be 'bought' for lower wages. They will work for lower wages as the money they are able to send home is astronimcal compared to a day's, heck, a month's paycheck in their home country. So they gladly accept lower wages, live frugally or come over together and live together to help defray costs. What does this do to American nursing jobs? Well, the math is easy - there are less jobs available to American nurses, and the nursing salary is depressed as a result of the willingness of foreign nurses to work for less.

    There, I've said my piece.

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