Number of Philippine Nurses Emigrating Skyrockets - page 19

The Philippines exports 15,000 nurses a year, and it's estimated that 1 in 10 Filipinos now works abroad. The nursing drain could have a crippling effect on the Philippines healthcare system. ... Read More

  1. by   fergus51
    My current unit trains a lot of new grads. Our results have been mixed to say the least. Most of them don't stick around for more than 2 years, even if they finish the orientation. They come to get trained and then start travel nursing for the big bucks. They wonder why the managers are sometimes hesitant to hire them, but I'm starting to see it. They are a huge investment and represent a huge loss when they leave or are fired.

    I completely agree with training new grads and hiring them over untrained foreigners (since both are untrained, it makes sense to take the American). I wouldn't advocate having a unit full of new grads rather than hiring an experienced nurse from overseas who is ready to roll.
  2. by   CaLLaCoDe
    Quote from unewmeb4
    ...i have worked with many fillipino nurses, and have enjoyed learning about their lives, their healthcare system,etc. quite frankly, i admire anyone who can leave home, travel to a foreign country, and work in a high stress place. my hat's off to you!
    god bless you! i am so grateful for the lessons learned, the comradery gained, the kindness noted by my fillipino nursing buddies. please, fillipino nurses, do not think all american nurses are against you; the contrary is so, we're mostly for you! because we all are doing difficult work that one poster stated on this post quite correctly :even if the school tuition were free for nursing school, not everyone would stick with it!!!

    i just finished listening to the npr report that the op of this thread recommended and was stunned of the consequences from this outsourcing (literally, nurses going abroad for work) and leaving their family's behind (1 in 10 citizens) ouch!

    now the philipines is suffering from this export business by not having enough nurses to combat potential emergencies (avian flu emergency for example) or just finding a nurse...the citizens suffer. what's a nurse to do over there when the monthly salary is $250.00 for a full month of work??!
    Last edit by CaLLaCoDe on Feb 14, '07
  3. by   Drakulya
    Quote from marymary
    I am not going to take my violin out right now, I will leave it in the closet. The problem that I have with Filipine nurses is not that they are working in the U.S., we have plenty of jobs to go around. It is the way that they intensify "nurses eating their young". I have met some very evil filipine nurses in my past eleven years of nursing. Some have blacklisted nurses, while others have tried to take away others nursing licenses. What I say to you, and your coutrymen/women, "be more empathetic to your fellow worker". There are many different cultures and manners of behavior in the United States. While in health care settings;Speaking another language around other nurses and patients is impolite and uprofessional. Kinda of like whispering. . Your countrymen just do not seem to get it or they do not care.
    That's all.:hatparty:
    I think they do so not because they are purposely whispering or talking about people behind their back, I think they just can't speak English as well as the locals do. I myself have the same problem. If I were in their shoes, I think I'd do the same, because it's much easier for me and we can communicate faster. But I agree that it's rude if we talked in our language in front of those who can't speak it.
    Last edit by Drakulya on Feb 16, '07
  4. by   Drakulya
    Quote from tizmonster
    I've met many nurses from UK, Ireland. Again, they are very passionate about their profession, and they care about their patients. They are solid professionals for the most part. I think a lot of the responses here is based on fear of loosing employment. The reality is this. Nurses that are foreign based must be paid in same fashion as their american co-workers. The PERM has been established to protect our workers from being impacted being displaced by others that would come here and work for less. The hospitals and clinics that are hiring workers outside of the USA must establish that these roles are not being filled by American workers - and they must prove that they have seriously posted these jobs internally and externally in the area. The issue is this...we have a major patient population coming into the system (baby-boomers) and a major retirement of our nursing professionals convering @ the same time. To make the issue even more dicey, our nursing schools are turning away 26,000 nurse student candidates - 'cause they aren't set up to handle the training part of the scenario. Part of the problem with this is the pay that educators in the nursing schools are not paid as much as they can make in a clinical setting. Part of the solution would be for the colleges to recognize this disparity and take the incomes up for these professionals. The only "bridge scenario" employers should be able to tap into would be to hire foreign nurses that have solid experience. That is being challenged by our homeland security issues right now. This is a mess.
    so i guess the problem really is

    1. with your government because they seem to ignore the problem and are just quite plain content with importing nurses from abroad, which is by the way, easier and less complicated for them because they don't have to go through all the hassles of legislation and all that jazz. so i hope others here don't put the blame on us foreign nurses taking your job, put the blame on your government for not addressing issues as you hope them to.

    2. on one side, cultural, in the sense that few Americans can't really take jobs they are "too good for" to do, those which immigrants are stereotyped to do. (posted by tweety, i think) there's a problem there, coz if there's a demand for nurses yet americans do not want to become nurses because of the back-breaking work then employers don't have a choice but give the job to foreigners.

    we really don't have a choice but allow foreign nurses in. besides it's not about being american or filipino, it's about needing the job to be filled.
    Last edit by Drakulya on Feb 16, '07
  5. by   Drakulya
    Quote from PFDGB
    you mentioned taking care of 30 patients ? No I never would do that ! Reason being is that I care about the lives and future of my patients. Maybe you would be willing to jeapordize their lives doing such a thing but no american born nurse would. One of those 30 patients could be your loved one some day that ends up in the basement of the hospital on a cold stretcher; all for the sake of saving the hospital a few bucks. Your ignorance is mind boggling...... Shame on you.....,
    actually nurses here in the philippines have no choice but work on those conditions. you don't understand because perhaps you have no first-hand encounter of poverty and in a third-world country such as ours this is not uncommon. and that's the reason why our best nurses immigrate to the u.s. not because they don't care about their dying countrymen in the hospitals, but because they care far too much for their families to suffer the same fate like our poor countrymen. mind you it is not ignorance. it is cold, hard reality which is poverty.
  6. by   Drakulya
    Quote from lee1
    Why not??? Do you have a national organization of RNs like the ANA here. What do they do???? Maybe if more of your nurses stayed in the Phillipines and became assertive things would improve. Not to say that here in the USA we have not tried. But we have many apathetic nurses who just work it seems for the money and really don't want to get all that interested in anything else that might just improve their working standards if only they would stand up and insist.
    Sadly, no, there is no hope for that here in the Philippines. If you live here and watch the news everyday, you might vomit every time being sick of the shameless government who never thought of the welfare of the citizenry who elected them in the first place. This might be off topic but at present the government is currently recruiting actors and actresses to run for the senatorial elections this coming May. I mean, what could be sicker than that. They are making such a sad, sick mockery of the ignorance of the Filipino masses, because they know the masses have no education, no understanding of what's going on in Philippine politics, so it won't even occur to them to complain. I wish we were Americans somehow, education there is mandatory and our masses would have a voice. Even if they were educated like we are, the masses wouldn't even care about the political situation in our country, why? Because before they do that, they have to find something to eat. That's how impoverished our country is. And hopeless. Even if the educated lot wants change, we can't because of the sick government we have here. Aside from the fact that everyone's starving enough to even speak out. That's reality here in the Philippines.
  7. by   scaredofshots
    http://www.nurseweek.com/news/featur...nal_print.html

    "The drawbacks are related to the fact that we are using immigration as a way to deal with our nursing shortage without addressing the root causes as to why we have a shortage." Cheryl Peterson, MSN, RN, senior policy fellow at the American Nurses Association said
  8. by   Sheri257
    Ego issues aside ... it is this naivete that the hospitals are counting on.

    The reason the hospitals are flocking to your country is because they don't want to pay U.S. staff nurses more money and Filipinos will work for less money because they don't know what the market wages are here. The wages they're obligated to pay Filipino nurses in the U.S. are much lower than actual market wages.

    Once you get here ... you'll see the same thing. You may not care much about that now but, you probably will care a lot once you get here and learn how much you really should be paid.

    Then, instead of giving you a raise, they'll hire other Filipino nurses to undercut your wages as a staff nurse.

    This doesn't just hurt U.S. nurses ... this is hurts Filipino nurses also.

    :typing
    Last edit by traumaRUs on Feb 25, '07 : Reason: Quoted deleted post
  9. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from Drakulya
    I think they do so not because they are purposely whispering or talking about people behind their back, I think they just can't speak English as well as the locals do. I myself have the same problem. If I were in their shoes, I think I'd do the same, because it's much easier for me and we can communicate faster. But I agree that it's rude if we talked in our language in front of those who can't speak it.
    Not necessarily. There were two nurses speking a foreign language in my presence, and they were making some snide remarks about me. I let it go for a while, then in their native language let them know that I understood every word they said. That shut them down pretty fast.

    You cannot assume it's just because of unease with the language, and really, how are they ever going to get truly fluent if they keep falling back on the other language? If they want to do that at home, fine, but in the workplace it's just rude, rude, rude.
  10. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from chichimitchi
    dont hate us coz u aint us! your just hatin coz u know most filipinas are better at their jobs and that they are progressing more that most of u.. lolz that felt good! mabuhay! plus if what ur saying is true about there isnt a shortage and all and that a lot of americans want to be nurses, why r ur hospitals flocking in our country to hire us??? please if u really want the job, then be really good, dont go blamming fiipinos for not getting a job, its a bunch of crap! leave us alone and be better at what u do! maybe then u wont have any problems.
    Posts like that will certainly do much for your cause...not.
  11. by   humming_bird
    Reading all the comments brings back memory of a statement made to me by a well respected nursing instructor years ago. Nurses need to learn how to stick together. We are like sandcrabs on the beach. When crabs fall into a bucket that is buried just below the surface, each one desperately tries to climb out. When the one succeeds in getting half-way, the rest pulls him/her back down and all end up dead at the bottom of the bucket.

    It was just an analogy that stuck in my mind all these years. Nurses as a profession, represent a major group of workers, and if we learn how to support and band together, we can make a tremendous impact on working conditions, quality of care, quality of life for nurses and patients, socio-economic conditions, etc. I have to remind myself to step back many times in my nursing career when I become disenchanted with myself and my environment. I have to put things in perspective and recognize my own biases and feelings to be able to think globally so that I do not become a product of narrow mindedness and selfishness. Other times. I have to remember to be selfish and take care of my own needs. Only then, when I take care of myself first, then can I live up to this priveleged nursing profession.

    I am a U.S. -born nurse of Filipino ethnicity, born and raised in Hawaii. It would be hard for me not to be proud of both.

    Thanks for letting me give my opinions.
  12. by   vets
    Quote from lee1
    then they should NOT be needing any financial help from the USA for their medical issues???
    Why should NOT? Does medical issues cover only nurses and the medical profession?
  13. by   SueBee RN-BSN
    Quote from lizz
    Ego issues aside ... it is this naivete that the hospitals are counting on.

    The reason the hospitals are flocking to your country is because they don't want to pay U.S. staff nurses more money and Filipinos will work for less money because they don't know what the market wages are here. The wages they're obligated to pay Filipino nurses in the U.S. are much lower than actual market wages.

    Once you get here ... you'll see the same thing. You may not care much about that now but, you probably will care a lot once you get here and learn how much you really should be paid.

    Then, instead of giving you a raise, they'll hire other Filipino nurses to undercut your wages as a staff nurse.

    This doesn't just hurt U.S. nurses ... this is hurts Filipino nurses also.

    :typing
    You could not be more right!!! In San Diego Filipino nurses make less, and live 5-8 in a two bedroom apartment. I saw this in 2003. These nurses were treated poorly by MD's as well, but could not defend themselves or back home they would go. Some were used for sex by MD's, married ones of course, and they were passed around. They would not defend themselves for fear of deportation.

    Our medical system has a special place in he__, for doing this.

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