No more smoking at work - page 3

by NurseTrishaH 11,520 Views | 89 Comments

while i understand that smoking is still legal in this country, and people have a right to smoke if they want to, i have to say that i love this policy. i really hate the smell of cigarette smoke on a person's clothing, breath,... Read More


  1. 7
    You can pull your hair back and it'll still stink of smoke. You can put a gown on and you'll still smell. There is new evidence that 3rd hand smoke is harmful to other people.
    AngelfireRN, nurse0520, hoopschick, and 4 others like this.
  2. 5
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    You can pull your hair back and it'll still stink of smoke. You can put a gown on and you'll still smell. There is new evidence that 3rd hand smoke is harmful to other people.
    It can give me a migraine. If it's really bad, I need to use my rescue inhaler. But hey, what's "a little discomfort" on my part?
  3. 1
    Quote from OCNRN63
    It can give me a migraine. If it's really bad, I need to use my rescue inhaler. But hey, what's "a little discomfort" on my part?
    So can obnoxious use of perfume or.., I dunno.... Springtime?
    woahmelly likes this.
  4. 5
    Quote from MyGranniePanties
    So can obnoxious use of perfume or.., I dunno.... Springtime?
    No kidding. I don't use any scented products. Where did you get the idea that I did? And if it makes you feel better, yeah, I need to see a pulmonologist; spring time can be brutal. That's why it's important for people like me to reduce exposure to "triggers," and why we're thankful hospitals are becoming aware of how detrimental cigarette smoke can be for non-smokers.

    I work in an oncology unit. Many of our patients deal with N/V. Is your attitude "Screw them if they get nauseated from my cigarette smell"? Are we not working for the benefit of the patient? I've seen some of our patients get extremely nauseated from even benign odors like coffee or food. Personally, I would feel terrible if I knew something I was doing was making someone (pt., co-worker) ill.
  5. 0
    Oh gosh this is heated. My opinion, it is your body, do what you want to it. Actually I know that Anna Jaques in Newburyport, Ma drug tests for tobacco as part of their initial hiring process. I find that a bit of an invasion of privacy, I mean, I don't want my nurse doing crazy drugs and then giving me someone-else's meds or whatever, but if you're gonna smoke, I can't stop you. But then again, if you want to smoke, then don't apply to this hospital. I'm not crazy about walking through the cloud of smoke to get in the front door to work, as there is yet to be a no-smoking policy at my hospital (though I work in the gut of Boston and I'd like them try to enforce it, as most of the smokers are likely not employees but just folks hanging around). Anyway, whatever. I mind my Bid-ness. I like it when people mind their Bid-ness and not make their Bid-ness my Bid-ness (that goes for a cloud of tobacco smoke in my face). Otherwise, knock yourself out.

    Oh I'm a non-smoker. But I'm not here to judge anyone, like I said, knock yourself out.
  6. 1
    Quote from OCNRN63
    No kidding. I don't use any scented products. Where did you get the idea that I did? And if it makes you feel better, yeah, I need to see a pulmonologist; spring time can be brutal. That's why it's important for people like me to reduce exposure to "triggers," and why we're thankful hospitals are becoming aware of how detrimental cigarette smoke can be for non-smokers.

    I work in an oncology unit. Many of our patients deal with N/V. Is your attitude "Screw them if they get nauseated from my cigarette smell"? Are we not working for the benefit of the patient? I've seen some of our patients get extremely nauseated from even benign odors like coffee or food. Personally, I would feel terrible if I knew something I was doing was making someone (pt., co-worker) ill.
    So I shouldn't eat or drink coffee while working either? Sorry but I'm glad that that Castro doesn't run my hospital, and even more glad that the majority of our clients actuly prefer it if we smoke.
    ChristineN likes this.
  7. 4
    Quote from MyGranniePanties
    ...glad that the majority of our clients actuly prefer it if we smoke.
    Really? Do you work at a substance abuse treatment clinic?

    I love the policy the hospitals I work at have about not even being able to smoke on the property; for us that means a smoker (including patients) must go across the street to smoke. That's true dedication.

    I agree with it being a little difficult to prove a smoke smell though. That's a rather subjective thing to try and enforce. I wish you could, but I see it being a little tough in practicality.

    A little off topic, but another law I would like to see is the ability to bring child abuse charges for persons smoking around children. I can't tell you how many kiddos we see in the ER time and time again, and their parents (and the kids) just reek of cigarette smoke. It stops being an "it's my body" argument when you're negatively affecting the health of those around you at the same time.
  8. 1
    I'd prefer not to smell tobacco smoke if I can help it. If I ran a hospital and I could go around on my own little power trip and decide what folks in my employ could and could not do, I'd probably have a few quirky rules and regulations.

    With that said, however, I would love to see the legal outcome of the employee who gets progressive discipline for showing up to work smelling like smoke when that employee was exposed to second hand smoke through unavoidable circumstances (walking through a smoke cloud on their way to work, etc.) Hmmmm.....
    Orange Tree likes this.
  9. 5
    This subject has been done to death on another thread; just sayin'....
  10. 0
    Quote from danh3190
    I'm all in favor of policies that forbid people from smoking on shift even during breaks. Many the time I've tried to find a patient's nurse only to have her wander back on the floor some minutes later from a smoke break out by the bus stop.
    I once told a boss that I should start smoking, so I can get extra breaks. He didn't like that. Oh, well.

    With the smoke-free campuses comes the special snowflakes who are allowed to leave the campus any time they want and smoke, as long as they clock out first.


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