No Jobs for New RNs, RN Job Shortage

  1. 8 Here is a news segment regarding this issue (the reporter sends a couple of inaccurate messages, but the description under the video is great):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgydCh2BTYY

    I was so nice to see this on the news! I feel like this is a start in bringing awareness to the public regarding this issue.



    Most of the public has believed that nursing is an area safe from the recession. Sadly, health care jobs are among the many other job areas that has been greatly impacted. All over the US, many qualified nurses are jobless. We continually hear about the nursing shortage, but new nurses are being denied RN positions. Most places are only hiring nurses with experience, leaving new RN's in a situation unable to gain experience. The inability of new nurses to start working, and maintain their knowledge and skills, could lead to many potential problems in the future. New grads can get hired, and there are positions out there, but there are far fewer positions than what is needed.

    According to USA Today (2010), the recession is basically masking the nursing shortage. Right now, due to the recession, the nursing shortage has eased a bit. This is partly due to the large number of experienced nurses not leaving the workforce, and experienced nurses coming back after being retired. However, due this, there is lack of vacancies for new nurses. New nurses are being denied positions. This could potentially result in a crisis. The "baby boomers" are continuing to age, leading to a large geriatric population. The older experienced nurses will eventually retire. This means more patients and less nurses. This is why there is a prediction that within the next 10-15 years, we will face an alarming nursing shortage.

    Turning away new graduates leads to fewer nurses available in the workforce. Further, it paints a misleading picture that there is no nursing shortage, deterring people from choosing the nursing profession as a career. Both of these will contribute to making the predicted shortage even worse. Here is an excerpt from a USA Today article about this situation:

    "Large nursing shortages are still forecast as aging Baby Boomers need more care ...A Vanderbilt University analysis last year-before the health law passed-predicted that the U.S. will be short 260,000 nurses by 2025.

    'It's enough to do significant interruptions to the health care system and potentially even render it inoperable,' says Peter Buerhaus, the study's author and director of Vanderbilt's Center for Interdisciplinary Health Workforce Studies. He says it's critical for policy leaders to find a way to keep new nursing graduates in the profession through the recession so projected shortages aren't even worse." (USA Today, 2010, p. 1)

    This is a very serious issue. The public should really be aware of the implications regarding this situation. Our health care system is already in jeopardy; however, it is going to be even worse if we don't find a way to get these new nurses hired, or at least keep them current/keep them in the nursing profession throughout this recession.
    Last edit by OregonStateRN on Nov 27, '10
  2. Enjoy this?

    Join thousands and get our weekly Nursing Insights newsletter with the hottest, discussions, articles, and toons.

  3. Visit  OregonStateRN} profile page

    About OregonStateRN

    Joined Oct '10; Posts: 4; Likes: 10.

    16 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  Old.Timer} profile page
    5
    indeed, the general public hasn't a clue - glad it is receiving some coverage. joanna73 made almost identical remarks earlier today in another thread.

    http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...ml#post4656980

    old.timer
    registered user
    received 10 kudos from 5 posts
    join date: oct 2010
    posts: 7 today, 05:40 pm

    originally posted by joanna73
    while i would agree that experience is important, i think you have to be careful about generalizing about new grads and under 30. i am a new nurse at 37. what i notice is that some experienced nurses seem to forget is that they were once new grads themselves. not to mention that as more nurses retire, new grads are needed to keep the system going. it is inevitable. with the 'experience only' mentality prevailing in many departments, new grads are shut out. it is very unfair. why did we work so hard, if no one is interested in hiring us?
    i could not agree more. ten years ago leaders from nursing, academia and the corporate world partnered together to address the current and projected nursing shortage. a huge marketing blitz was launched attempting to restore the image and touting the stability and benefits of a career in nursing. people were practically being guaranteed jobs in the nursing field with the completion of their studies. those in less stable fields were encouraged to switch careers, assume loans, return to nursing school and sign on for the incredibly rewarding career that would be waiting for them.

    now we don't want them. i literally get heartsick at the number of posts by new graduates searching for jobs to no avail. never in my wildest dreams would i have predicted this outcome.

    personally, i think the entire situation is shameful.
    nurse0520, -nurse-, Testa Rosa, RN, and 2 others like this.
  5. Visit  Riverrat2010} profile page
    10
    I'm one of those new nurses who quit a lucrative job in the business world to fulfill a lifelong dream of becoming a nurse. After three years and over 50K in educational expenses, I find myself unemployable. While I didn't enter nursing school for the money, (I'll actually be taking a pay cut if I ever find a job), I certainly didn't expect to be treated like a pariah by hiring managers. Most of the employment listings in my area request one year of paid hospital experience prior to application. I am considering moving to another city and leaving my husband and family to find employment. I've been asked by several people if I regret my decision to become a nurse and I tell them it's still the best decision I've ever made; however it's very demoralizing to give up your life to excel in a nursing program and then realize you have no immediate future in the field.
  6. Visit  NewTexasRN} profile page
    1
    Quote from Riverrat2010
    I'm one of those new nurses who quit a lucrative job in the business world to fulfill a lifelong dream of becoming a nurse. After three years and over 50K in educational expenses, I find myself unemployable. While I didn't enter nursing school for the money, (I'll actually be taking a pay cut if I ever find a job), I certainly didn't expect to be treated like a pariah by hiring managers. Most of the employment listings in my area request one year of paid hospital experience prior to application. I am considering moving to another city and leaving my husband and family to find employment. I've been asked by several people if I regret my decision to become a nurse and I tell them it's still the best decision I've ever made; however it's very demoralizing to give up your life to excel in a nursing program and then realize you have no immediate future in the field.

    I know how you feel hang in there. I had to move out of State too. Jobs are out there. Relocation is the key.
    lindarn likes this.
  7. Visit  stephie_love} profile page
    7
    I am a nursing student and a PCT in a hospital, and today I find one of the nurses on-unit on FACEBOOK and shoe-shopping while on the clock.

    Isn't it disgusting to know this while so many are begging for jobs??

    Dear nurses on FB and Zappos during working hours, I hope to have your spot come May when I graduate. Please don't take your job for granted.
    Nierdo, nurse0520, UnbreakableOne, and 4 others like this.
  8. Visit  savvy-nurse} profile page
    2
    Quote from OregonStateRN
    Here is a news segment regarding this issue (the reporter sends a couple of inaccurate messages, but the description under the video is great):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgydCh2BTYY

    I was so nice to see this on the news! I feel like this is a start in bringing awareness to the public regarding this issue.



    Most of the public has believed that nursing is an area safe from the recession. Sadly, health care jobs are among the many other job areas that has been greatly impacted. All over the US, many qualified nurses are jobless. We continually hear about the nursing shortage, but new nurses are being denied RN positions. Most places are only hiring nurses with experience, leaving new RN's in a situation unable to gain experience. The inability of new nurses to start working, and maintain their knowledge and skills, could lead to many potential problems in the future. New grads can get hired, and there are positions out there, but there are far fewer positions than what is needed.

    According to USA Today (2010), the recession is basically masking the nursing shortage. Right now, due to the recession, the nursing shortage has eased a bit. This is partly due to the large number of experienced nurses not leaving the workforce, and experienced nurses coming back after being retired. However, due this, there is lack of vacancies for new nurses. New nurses are being denied positions. This could potentially result in a crisis. The "baby boomers" are continuing to age, leading to a large geriatric population. The older experienced nurses will eventually retire. This means more patients and less nurses. This is why there is a prediction that within the next 10-15 years, we will face an alarming nursing shortage.

    Turning away new graduates leads to fewer nurses available in the workforce. Further, it paints a misleading picture that there is no nursing shortage, deterring people from choosing the nursing profession as a career. Both of these will contribute to making the predicted shortage even worse. Here is an excerpt from a USA Today article about this situation:

    "Large nursing shortages are still forecast as aging Baby Boomers need more care ...A Vanderbilt University analysis last year-before the health law passed-predicted that the U.S. will be short 260,000 nurses by 2025.

    'It's enough to do significant interruptions to the health care system and potentially even render it inoperable,' says Peter Buerhaus, the study's author and director of Vanderbilt's Center for Interdisciplinary Health Workforce Studies. He says it's critical for policy leaders to find a way to keep new nursing graduates in the profession through the recession so projected shortages aren't even worse." (USA Today, 2010, p. 1)

    This is a very serious issue. The public should really be aware of the implications regarding this situation. Our health care system is already in jeopardy; however, it is going to be even worse if we don't find a way to get these new nurses hired, or at least keep them current/keep them in the nursing profession throughout this recession.
    This is such a hot topic right now. The truth is there IS a shortage of nurses. Unfortunatly, it is highly localized. While some cities and states have too many nurses, others have too few. Overall, there is a critical shortage worldwide. It is not a myth.

    The other reason why it seems as though there are no jobs for new grads is the economy. Many hospitals are functioning on less than optimal nurseatient ratios. They are in survival mode.

    I know this does not help any new grad's immediate situation. However, knowing the market helps you strageically plan you job search efforts. I wrote an article on this. I think if you look at page 71 in the magazine, you will find some helpfuly tips on how to find that job, even in this economy.

    I noticed the report is in Oregon City. Yep, the Portland area is very saturated. Salem, too. But not all of Oregon. They need help on the coast, and especially down south. I received an offer for up to $50/hr -a 6weeks travel contract. That tells me they are very much in need. A place like that may be willing to hire a new grad. Also, Salem just hired a few into their internship programs. If you live in portland, I know it is a long drive. I know a few people who are doing this regularly.

    If you are willing to relocate, there are hospitals out there begging for nurses.

    I hope that helps. let me know if you get a chance to read the article.It is the first in a series and I am always willing to help, if you have more questions.

    Good luck!
    Note: I appreciate you situation enough not to mention that I am a Ducks fan. Beavers are ok, though when they are playing someone else. LOL.
    CaLLaCoDe and lindarn like this.
  9. Visit  jpeters84} profile page
    3
    Savvy-nurse- I've heard a couple of people say that there are hospitals out there "begging for nurses", or there's "plenty of jobs you just need to relocate"...You guys need to name names. WHERE?...WHICH HOSPITALS???...I am literally on the internet day and night and I feel like I have a pretty good grip on who is hiring anywhere in the country and while there are a few pockets of places in the country where nurse recruiters will talk to new grads (Boise, parts of Michigan, Texas, parts of Tennessee) Hiring a few new grads into their program does not mean they are begging for nurses. I applied to Salem with two references of nurses that work on that unit and I still couldn't get a job. I applied to hospitals on the Southern Coast of Oregon with 4 openings on the one floor alone and they will not hire me because I am a new grad. I have not come across a single hospital "begging for nurses", nor am I really aware of a place that is worth moving to just on the hopes that they are hiring. I will relocate...with a job offer. So please, I implore people on this website: If you know of a hospital that is for sure hiring new grads actively please let us know the name of it!

    P.S most travel nursing companies aren't going to hire new grads. But I definitely appreciate that you're a duck fan
  10. Visit  RevolutioN2013} profile page
    0
    Presbyterian Hospital in Charlotte NC - about a week ago had listings specifically asking for new grads. My guess is that these hospitals do not need to list their jobs in national search engines because they can fill the positions so quickly from a large pool of local applicants .
  11. Visit  fyrefaye} profile page
    0
    A lot of the hospitals in Oregon have adopted a BSN only policy since they have the pick of the litter at this point. I know all new grads of my current program (as of next month) already have jobs lined up in OR or WA. I think new ADNs are the hardest hit here.
  12. Visit  DNS on the go} profile page
    1
    Nursing is a tough trade to be in. Do not believe all the hype. As a new nurse, without any real experience you are a gamble that in today's world-many hospitals do not wish to take. Your real education and training begins when you get your first job. Your nursing education and clinicals are a very light taste of what nursing is all about. I have witness many young nurses who were stars in school enter the trade as a floor nurse only to fail, quit, be fired or regret becoming a nurse. There are jobs out their but only for the experienced nurses who have a track record and have been formally trained as nurses. For the new graduates, I am sorry but timing is key. In NYC, we have the new nurses from the class of 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010 out looking for work. Employers can be very slective in who they take...BSN only, second careers nurses who have successful prior careers, etc. It is sad but nursing is becoming like other professions in that luck and who you know help get you in the door. When I graduated (way back) I could not get a job as a nurse-the market was saturated. I waited almost a year and was lucky to land a job as a weekend per diem staff nurse in a nursing home doing custodial care. It was a foot in the door and I was lucky I had my other non nurisng job. I eventually proved myself and this nursing home trained me to work in sub acute, rehab and the vent unit. The exposure was great and after 7 years I was able to move on to a hospital as a staff nurse. For the new nurses out there my advise is get your foot in the door...Nursing home, home health, assisted living, clinics, doctors office, whatever. You can not be picky. If you show your self to be dedicated and a hard worker, you might have a chance, once the jobs open up. I think a key point that the young unemployeed nurses do not understand is that when the jobs open up, you are going to have to compete with the most recent graduates. The knowledge you have does grow old and stale as nursing is a practice discipline. For those who are considering nursing, do your research, seriously think about nursing and what it is all about. Nursing is not a way to make a quick buck...it is very hard work. Nursing will strain your body, your mind and your soul and you will never receive the rewards or respect due to you.
    JeanettePNP likes this.
  13. Visit  Conan the Nurse} profile page
    0
    I am anticipating that first break in the job market to be really rough. But this is what I want to do. I am anxious.
  14. Visit  -nurse-} profile page
    0
    Quote from Riverrat2010
    I'm one of those new nurses who quit a lucrative job in the business world to fulfill a lifelong dream of becoming a nurse. After three years and over 50K in educational expenses, I find myself unemployable. While I didn't enter nursing school for the money, (I'll actually be taking a pay cut if I ever find a job), I certainly didn't expect to be treated like a pariah by hiring managers. Most of the employment listings in my area request one year of paid hospital experience prior to application. I am considering moving to another city and leaving my husband and family to find employment. I've been asked by several people if I regret my decision to become a nurse and I tell them it's still the best decision I've ever made; however it's very demoralizing to give up your life to excel in a nursing program and then realize you have no immediate future in the field.
    Not to be rude, but how can you honestly say that it's the best decision that you have ever made? I would wait to bank on that.

    To the OP, awesome post. I have been stressing the same point to so many of my friends who are pestering me about going into nursing. Most want quick/easy money and don't even realize what they are getting themselves into.
  15. Visit  joanna73} profile page
    0
    I agree with most of what you have said in the above post. However, please keep in mind that not all new grads are young and inexperienced. I may be new to nursing, but I gave this venture a great deal of thought and preparation before hand. I am willing to learn and work hard. I have also been working now in professional environments for 20 years. I am certain that other new grads fall into this category, and many younger people are also eager to learn. But we need a chance. 3 years ago, jobs were plentiful, and there was no issue.

    Fortunately, I have a part time RN position, but myself, and thousands of others have student loans too. While you may point out that new grads are a liability of sorts, this notion is at least partial BS. I cannot improve my skills and knowledge without working. I managed to survive four years of clinical without injuring or killing anyone. You learn as you go, and improve. New nurses should not be picky, but they do need some opportunities. There are very few at the moment, which is frightening. Instead of buying my house, I decided to return to school. I laid everything on the line for nursing. It is my second, and last career. Similarly, countless others are in the same situation, when facilities are short staffed, and nurses are overworked. It makes no sense.

    I think someone should speak out about this mess. Somehow, something needs to change for nursing in general. Coincidentally, I have witnessed this before in the 90's, which is the reason I delayed going to nursing school then. I guess the joke's on me...


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

Top