No, Caps Are Not Totally Gone - page 7

by DoGoodThenGo

29,672 Views | 176 Comments

Nurse proudly wears the cap that defines her profession If you've visited McKay-Dee Hospital, there's good chance you've seen nurse Linda MacPherson. There are a lot of nurses at the hospital in Ogden, though, so what... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from caliotter3
    When I was a candystriper we had caps made of the same striped material as our pinafores. If I remember right we had a little ceremony just like nursing school. There was some kind of awards ceremony with an article in the local newspaper. I think the candystripers in the picture were wearing their caps.
    I doubt anyone would mistake a red and white striped cap that matched the pinafore for a nurse's cap, esp. on a teenager.
    HazelLPN likes this.
  2. 1
    Looking back on it, I think our uniforms were cute. But it seems at the time I thought they were dorky.
    RetRN77 likes this.
  3. 1
    Quote from elkpark
    When was this "heyday" you're talking about, and do you have any documentation of this? I was around in the "old days" and never saw anyone other than licensed nurses wearing caps -- the official cap of their school. I was a candystriper, and none of us in my hospital wore caps. I've never seen a dental hygienist or veterinary tech wearing a cap, either.
    Psssst!

    Pipe:
    http://www.201.net/issues/2010/01/fe...istory&sort=-1
    RetRN77 likes this.
  4. 4
    Quote from elkpark
    When was this "heyday" you're talking about, and do you have any documentation of this? I was around in the "old days" and never saw anyone other than licensed nurses wearing caps -- the official cap of their school. I was a candystriper, and none of us in my hospital wore caps. I've never seen a dental hygienist or veterinary tech wearing a cap, either.
    A friend who lives up the road from me is a dental hygienist (aka dental nurse in other parts of the world), and she informs me that when she was at school (1980's or 1970's not sure and didn't think to ask), she wore a cap, and there are pictures of dental nurses out there wearing caps.

    Would have to say the "heyday" for caps and all and sundry wearing them was from the 1940's until 1970's or so, and that was the period I was referring to, though obviously nurses wore the things far earlier than that.

    Did all hosptials have caps as part of their candy striper uniform? Probably not, but some did, would try to find more, but one has to "Google" through to many pages of naughty "uniform" adverts.
    RetRN77, nursel56, Fiona59, and 1 other like this.
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    I just wanted to say thank you to everyone.....I've enjoyed thinking about my past as I am looking towards my future.....my spring break is almost done...I have to report to work tomorrow and the weeked. And then to class on Monday morning.....rememebering the past and all I've seen and the people's lives I've touched as well as those who have touched mine was been has brought to light the reason I wanted to be a nurse to begin with.....thank you. Thank you from the bottom of my nursemates to the top of my NURSING CAP!!!
    HazelLPN, RetRN77, and nursel56 like this.
  6. 3
    Quote from caliotter3
    When I was a candystriper we had caps made of the same striped material as our pinafores. If I remember right we had a little ceremony just like nursing school. There was some kind of awards ceremony with an article in the local newspaper. I think the candystripers in the picture were wearing their caps.
    Really is a shame hospitals for the most part have done away with candy striper programs. Remember well the ones at my hometown's local hospitals (St. Vincent's Medical Center and Staten Island Hospital), and am here to tell you it was *not* fun and games, you *worked*.

    There was a several week long instruction program (mainly about transporting patients, making beds, etc..), but once you showed up and punched in, you were on your feet, no lolling about looking cute in that uniform. There was bed making (oh how there was bed making), feeding and or assisting patients at meal times, feeding babies, cuddling and playing with infants/children in Peds, running and fetching for the nursing staff, giving out water, newspapers, etc and so forth. Yes, one did not get paid, but the satisfaction you got from making a patient's hosptial stay that much better. Nurses and doctors were always so busy, patients really liked that someone could stop and have a chat, or read to them.

    Did I mention there was cuddling babies? You got so attached to the wee things, it often broke your heart to find out why a particular child was in hospital, and worse if you came back or otherwise heard he/she didn't make it. The first time I ever encounted a "failure to thrive" infant as working as a "JV" in Peds. Of course I was never told this, nor privy to other direct care matters, but remember a very high ranking staff doctor explaining the case to a group of nurse's at the station, whom were gathered around and listening as if glued to the spot as I passed the nurse's station.

    Next to being a NA, working as a "JV" then gave one the best insight as to what nurses did and indeed the world of medicine. Many, who are doctors and nurses today got their first taste of the floors working as volunteers.
    HazelLPN, RetRN77, and SuesquatchRN like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from HelenofOz
    that sounds amazing-any chance of getting a look at it?

    Helen
    who wore a starched cotton organza veil at graduation, and a paper veil on the wards (1974), and again in 1982, caps would have been so much easier but that is what we wore when we were training (starched cotton).
    I will whiffle through my collection and see if I can't find it again.
  8. 1
    Quote from NancyPie
    My nursing program, we wear full whites to clinicals. It bothers a lot of people, but I don't see why. I like them. There are a couple nurses at the hospitals where we do clinicals that wear full white as well. I LOVE it! I've never seen a nurse wearing a cap, but we are going to be wearing them at our pinning ceremony. I found it interesting that in photos at our school of pinning ceremonies in years past, a majority of the students are wearing dresses, but I've never seen one wearing one in the hospital. I'm curious to know how uncommon it is for nurses now days to wear skirts. I've seen a few in doctor's offices, but only once ever in a hospital.
    We live in a much less formal society than days past, it is hard enough to get young girls/women into a dress for events such as church, funerals and the like. Even women in the highest places such as CEOs and government wear pants more often than dresses. I mean when was the last time you saw Hillary Clinton in a dress or skirt?

    It really has been within the past twenty years or so that hospital nursing staff got permission to wear pantsuits (white of course), then even scrub top and pant sets. Prior to this it was dresses, skirts and all that went with them (hose, nylons, suspender belts, girdles, slips, petticoats....). As hospital nursing is practiced today, you really need freedom to move about easily, not to mention wearing a dress or skirt meant one could give a "show" if say you had to climb up or bend down, or worse get onto the floor (to plug something into an electrical outlet). Quite a few OR and L&D nurses didn't like having to get up on stool or such to adjust a lamp wearing a scrub dress when certain "peeping tom" type doctors were lurking about.

    Pant suits are much more economical when purchasing uniforms. You can mix and match tops, and if a top is really badly stained at least you aren't throwing away an entire uniform. Also separates are more forgiving of the various shapes and forms of the female figure as it moves through various times of life, IMHO.

    Leave us examine this example:

    The first prolly would work for various shapes, but the other two one is going to have to start laying down plans at about 13 to pull it off! *LOL*
    RetRN77 likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    I mean when was the last time you saw Hillary Clinton in a dress or skirt?
    heheh... I remember that joke
  10. 0
    Quote from Carolina Nights
    "She thinks she's probably the only nurse in the area to do so."

    Maybe the country!
    No, she's not. There are several nurses at my hospital who wear caps, and interestingly, they are younger nurses. Caps are discouraged but not prohibited, due to infection control and safety issues.


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