No, Caps Are Not Totally Gone - page 6

by DoGoodThenGo

29,655 Views | 176 Comments

Nurse proudly wears the cap that defines her profession If you've visited McKay-Dee Hospital, there's good chance you've seen nurse Linda MacPherson. There are a lot of nurses at the hospital in Ogden, though, so what... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from Franciscangypsy
    I wore one for two or three months while I was on orientation at my hospital. My patients and their families loved it -- as did people from transport, lab, etc. I stopped when I realized that this was my nursing school cap and that I had no way of getting another one or even disinfecting this one -- ewwww.

    Months later, I got snagged by coworkers asking why I stopped. Some smug, but a few were actually disappointed.

    It was a good experience and fun for a while, but to be quite frank, I was always fixing it when I got in and out of the car, when I got my stethoscope on and off my neck, and whenever I bumped my head, lol. It made me like a foot taller and I was constantly bumping my head and jarring it.

    Not to mention, I'm told that I look a little young for age and I was constantly being mistaken for a nursing student. Fresh out of nursing school, that was really the last thing I wanted to hear.
    As with nurse's uniforms, one does not need to "disinfect" a cap, it wasn't even done back in the days when hospitals provided laundry services.Simple washing, drying and ironing will sanitise the cap enough for all normal purposes. The main problem with caps towards the later years is that nurses simply didn't launder them regular or at all. The things were taken off and chucked around locker rooms, including on the floor (the most contaminated part of any hospital), only to be put on at the start of one's next shift of duty.Part of this was because hospitals by and large stopped offering free or discounted laundry services to nurses, and sending one's cap out to a "hand laundry" for washing, starching and ironing was dear, too dear to multiply via several times per month. Next came the general shift in laundry habits away from ironing in general, which meant laundry including uniforms.There was a time when *everything* from bras to men's shorts were ironed, once "wash and wear" replaced starched whites, there was less reason to sit around washing and ironing caps. To be fair Kay's and other makers of caps came out with "no starch" caps (one simply plastered the thing wet from washing against any flat surface, such as the side of the fridge), to dry, but still many young nurses couldn't be bothered.
    HazelLPN likes this.
  2. 2
    My nursing program, we wear full whites to clinicals. It bothers a lot of people, but I don't see why. I like them. There are a couple nurses at the hospitals where we do clinicals that wear full white as well. I LOVE it! I've never seen a nurse wearing a cap, but we are going to be wearing them at our pinning ceremony. I found it interesting that in photos at our school of pinning ceremonies in years past, a majority of the students are wearing dresses, but I've never seen one wearing one in the hospital. I'm curious to know how uncommon it is for nurses now days to wear skirts. I've seen a few in doctor's offices, but only once ever in a hospital.
  3. 2
    I'm sad my school doesn't have a capping ceremony - just pinning in regular business dress clothes I see all the neat old class graduation portraits of nurses in their dress whites and caps and I think it would be awesome if my school had a capping & pinning ceremony and we all got a cap. I know of some schools that have beautiful capping ceremonies - with a pledge, candles, and caps. Something like that would be a special thing for my family to see.
    DroogieRN and RetRN77 like this.
  4. 1
    Quote from NancyPie
    My nursing program, we wear full whites to clinicals. It bothers a lot of people, but I don't see why. I like them. There are a couple nurses at the hospitals where we do clinicals that wear full white as well. I LOVE it! I've never seen a nurse wearing a cap, but we are going to be wearing them at our pinning ceremony. I found it interesting that in photos at our school of pinning ceremonies in years past, a majority of the students are wearing dresses, but I've never seen one wearing one in the hospital. I'm curious to know how uncommon it is for nurses now days to wear skirts. I've seen a few in doctor's offices, but only once ever in a hospital.
    I'm like you I wish we wore whites for our program too, and I think caps, at least for the ceremony, are nice.
    HazelLPN likes this.
  5. 1
    The last nurse to wear a cap took it off about 8 years ago and I haven't seen a cap since.

    They do define the profession, but they are ugly. LOL
    SuesquatchRN likes this.
  6. 0
    Back when I first became an LPN I used to wear dresses....the Scrub dresses and Skirts...now that I'm working in a hosptial that is busy and always full.....I just don't see dresses as practical. I sometimes miss my dresses (down to mid calf) and I almost bought a dress for my capping and pinning....but don't think I have the legs for it anymore.
  7. 2
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Just so people know, in the heyday of caps, before the things started to go the way of the Dodo, *any* female staff in nursing or medical related profession wore them, or could have. Up to and including:Candy StripersDental "Nurses"Vetinerary "Nurses"And anything else that creepth and crawleth upon this earth that was female and "nursing related".What evolved was a vast and dizzingly system of stripes, colours and such that one could never expect a patient to unravel.
    When was this "heyday" you're talking about, and do you have any documentation of this? I was around in the "old days" and never saw anyone other than licensed nurses wearing caps -- the official cap of their school. I was a candystriper, and none of us in my hospital wore caps. I've never seen a dental hygienist or veterinary tech wearing a cap, either.
    HazelLPN and RetRN77 like this.
  8. 1
    When I was a candystriper we had caps made of the same striped material as our pinafores. If I remember right we had a little ceremony just like nursing school. There was some kind of awards ceremony with an article in the local newspaper. I think the candystripers in the picture were wearing their caps.
    SuesquatchRN likes this.
  9. 0
    I still wear skirts and dresses but only when it's warm enough that I don't need hose. They're long enough that it isn't an issue and they command instant respect. It's a funny thing but when anyone sees me in a white skirt their posture improves.
  10. 2
    My first DON wore white dresses, hose, real nurses shoes, and cap. She was one of the first and last nurses to wear a cap that I noticed this go around at nursing. I used to think she looked quite awesome. Then about ten years later, a new grad RN started working at the LTC facility I was at. She sometimes wore a white dress uniform. Somehow it didn't quite fit her figure very well, but it was kind of neat to see her in it. Her husband got her one of those gold plated stethoscopes for graduation and everybody kept wondering out loud when it was going to disappear!
    RetRN77 and SuesquatchRN like this.


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