No, Caps Are Not Totally Gone - page 17

by DoGoodThenGo 31,247 Views | 176 Comments

Nurse proudly wears the cap that defines her profession If you've visited McKay-Dee Hospital, there's good chance you've seen nurse Linda MacPherson. There are a lot of nurses at the hospital in Ogden, though, so what... Read More


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    This site is amazing - the Pope's little skullcap is called a zucchetto (on google). Had to look up wimples too. All I could think of was
    Sister Mary Wimple being related to Mr. Whipple!!!

    Looked up some of the nsg cap references hereand thoroughly enjoyed them also.
    RetRN77, HazelLPN, and nursel56 like this.
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    Female covering their heads & the Catholic Church:

    Here ya go girls: Head Coverings in Church

    Keep in mind also that until or unless rules changed it was the custom within the church for consecrated virgins never to have their heads uncovered. Hence members of female Catholic religous orders besides whatever headcovering that was part of their habit worn during the day a variety of caps and or bonnets worn for everything from sleeping to (one assumes) bathing. Though as personal hygiene standards changed mandating more frequent washing of the hair that rule must have been suspended sometime.
    nursel56 and HazelLPN like this.
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    Quote from MunoRN
    I think it's great to have some appreciation for our history, but part of that is an accurate understanding of it. Nursing caps are indeed a symbol of subserviency. The Nursing cap is a carry over from the Nun's Wimple. The covering of a part or all of a woman's head was (and still is in many cultures) a symbol of reverence towards men and patriarchal hierarchy, whether it be Nuns and Priests or Nurses and Physicians. This wasn't just among Catholics, if you look at photos of church services from the mid 20th century, you'll notice that all of the women are wearing hats, even in protestant churches, this was how women showed reverence to the preacher and to God. This comes from Corinthians which states that men should worship with their head uncovered, as they are the image of God, while women are the image of men. Covering one's head is how women acknowledge that they are 1 step removed from God, with men in between.
    DoGoodThenGo said it better than I ever could.

    I'll add that wearing a cap is a personal thing. I never agreed with the subservient arguments that were popular back in the 70s when the cap started to go out of fashion. To me, my cap is a symbol of how hard I had to work to earn it.

    Best to you,
    Mrs H.
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    Quote from MunoRN
    Covering one's head is how women acknowledge that they are 1 step removed from God, with men in between.
    People who actually believe this type of nonsense to be true is what makes people rebel from traditions like this in the first place.

    How about an atheist woman "covering one's head to acknowledge that she is a nurse."

    I think hats were destined to go out the window with the whole women's movement. Unless employers were to start requiring men to wear them then they couldn't require it of women either...same thing with dresses.

    I think people should wear them if they want to. It's a nice tradition. I dunno if I'd want to participate though.
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    Quote from Ntheboat2
    People who actually believe this type of nonsense to be true is what makes people rebel from traditions like this in the first place.

    How about an atheist woman "covering one's head to acknowledge that she is a nurse."

    I think hats were destined to go out the window with the whole women's movement. Unless employers were to start requiring men to wear them then they couldn't require it of women either...same thing with dresses.

    I think people should wear them if they want to. It's a nice tradition. I dunno if I'd want to participate though.
    First of all nurses wear caps, not hats. There is a minor but important difference.

    Next we've covered the sexist aspect of caps before and yes one of the reasons you don't see facilities mandating them (along with dresses for that matter) is because of settled federal and state laws regarding employment/educational dress codes. Long story short absent some very powerful reason dress for either workplace or schools including colleges and universities cannot be based purely on sex/gender.

    There is nothing stopping a hospital, nursing home, LTC, or whatever from saying *all* nurses must wear caps, but am here to tell you don't be surprised if several *male* nurses show up for duty wearing one. Trust me I know some of them personally who have been dying to wear a cap and even *whites* to work (please, don't ask *LOL*).
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    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    First of all nurses wear caps, not hats. There is a minor but important difference.

    Next we've covered the sexist aspect of caps before and yes one of the reasons you don't see facilities mandating them (along with dresses for that matter) is because of settled federal and state laws regarding employment/educational dress codes. Long story short absent some very powerful reason dress for either workplace or schools including colleges and universities cannot be based purely on sex/gender.

    There is nothing stopping a hospital, nursing home, LTC, or whatever from saying *all* nurses must wear caps, but am here to tell you don't be surprised if several *male* nurses show up for duty wearing one. Trust me I know some of them personally who have been dying to wear a cap and even *whites* to work (please, don't ask *LOL*).
    I had a very dear male cowoker friend who is an RN who would (in jest) ask to borrow MY cap when he had to have a difficult conversation with a doc, a coworker, a family member, etc. I would tell him politely that first of all, I wear an LPNs cap and he would need a black strip on his...and second of all... he didn't train where I did...and he would never have made it through my catholic hospital based diploma program that was run by nuns. I don't think many kids these days would....not only was it darn hard work, you lived at the hospital, worked as a student nurse at the hospital when you were not in school (slave labor, but it was EXCELLENT training...you really learned your nursing that way...critical thinking long before the term became the buzz word). I worked in critical care nursing for nearly 50 years and not much scares me these days...but I'm still afraid of nuns....even as a liberal protestant!

    Brava to your exceptional posts,

    Mrs H.
    RetRN77 likes this.
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    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    First of all nurses wear caps, not hats. There is a minor but important difference.

    Next we've covered the sexist aspect of caps before and yes one of the reasons you don't see facilities mandating them (along with dresses for that matter) is because of settled federal and state laws regarding employment/educational dress codes. Long story short absent some very powerful reason dress for either workplace or schools including colleges and universities cannot be based purely on sex/gender.

    There is nothing stopping a hospital, nursing home, LTC, or whatever from saying *all* nurses must wear caps, but am here to tell you don't be surprised if several *male* nurses show up for duty wearing one. Trust me I know some of them personally who have been dying to wear a cap and even *whites* to work (please, don't ask *LOL*).
    Oh, darn....well then...since it's been covered before I should've known and never should've mentioned it!

    Can you direct me to a place on this site where there is a nursing topic that has NOT been covered before?
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    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Love those collections of nurse's caps show above. It is nice to think that when a nurse wanted her school's cap to rest somewhere for posterity sake.

    There are more than a handful of school caps that are nearly impossible to lay hands on, and those that earned the right to wear them keep it that way! *LOL*

    I mean you would be hard pressed to find a "Bellevue Fluff" in a thirft store or on eBay, it just seems never to happen. Kay's Caps has patterns for hundreds of school caps, even from programs long since defunct, but IIRC certain ones require some sort of proof you actually graduated from the program to place an order.
    Yes, I applied to Kay's Caps for my school cap, but they state they have no record of having made it! I guess I must have imagined the little "Kay's Caps" tags inside. > At least it is a fairly common style, but that still upsets me, especially as I loaned mine to a friend who was too thoughtless to take care of it and told me she couldn't find it when I asked for it back.
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    Droll, but point taken. *LOL*
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    Now you know why so many are protective of their caps, even if they haven't worn the thing since graduation. *LOL*

    I'd tell your "friend" to either get busy finding that cap or start looking for a new one. Hate when people ask to brorrow things but don't take care of them and or return.

    Kay's purchased the stock/patterns from a few defunct nurse's cap makers IIRC. When you add those to their already vast inventory am shocked they don't have yours in stock or at least the pattern.

    What school did you attend? Can you post a picture of your cap? Will keep my eyes peeled in case one pops up. Is your school still around to order another?


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