No, Caps Are Not Totally Gone - page 16

by DoGoodThenGo | 31,699 Views | 176 Comments

Nurse proudly wears the cap that defines her profession If you've visited McKay-Dee Hospital, there's good chance you've seen nurse Linda MacPherson. There are a lot of nurses at the hospital in Ogden, though, so what... Read More


  1. 4
    Quote from nursel56
    I love your posts, DGTG. I always learn from them. The top pic with the array of caps is really interesting.
    TY! What a nice thing to say!

    At one time there were at least 3,000 hospital schools of nursing alone in the United States, each more likely than not had their own cap. The mind boggles thinking about how many styles and shapes of caps there were out there.

    Really is a shame no one thought to catalog all those nurse's caps and even student uniforms into a book or something. There are several that have done so for female Catholic religous orders and you wouldn't think there were so many different habits and headgear would you?
    ShariDCST, RetRN77, HazelLPN, and 1 other like this.
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    In the US, these are a common style of cap that endured well into the 20th century, these are Wimple derived caps:



    ShariDCST likes this.
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    I just LOVE LOVE LOVE these posts about caps!!! I've posted on several of them recently. I guess it probably has something to do with the fact that I also love wearing hats (and I went to Catholic school back in the day of hair coverings for church).
    ShariDCST and nursel56 like this.
  4. 3
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    TY! What a nice thing to say!

    At one time there were at least 3,000 hospital schools of nursing alone in the United States, each more likely than not had their own cap. The mind boggles thinking about how many styles and shapes of caps there were out there.

    Really is a shame no one thought to catalog all those nurse's caps and even student uniforms into a book or something. There are several that have done so for female Catholic religious orders and you wouldn't think there were so many different habits and headgear would you?
    I really thought someone had done this! Not to get too political - just an observation . . .I hope the lack of attention given to this doesn't reflect a desire to cut off the past resulting from a (mistaken I think) belief in associations of being subservient or handmaidenly. Lots of trailblazers and leaders in nursing wore caps.

    amolucia - though I don't wear hats often, I do think being raised Catholic has amplified my interest in traditional garb both by religious orders and in nursing history. The last "hat" I remember wearing was a little lace circle that came in a plastic case . . .yes, the "Chapel Cap" -- it was so small it became to me a why bother sort of thing. I loved my mother's mantilla, though.
    ShariDCST, RetRN77, and HazelLPN like this.
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    I can't think all you posters enough! I spent the best part of my morning exploring this thread, and thoroughly enjoyed it! I learned a good bit, and was thoroughly entertained. Also, the pictures tell a story themselves, and it was awesome of you who posted them to take the time to share that with nurses like me who's still learning how Great Our Profession Really Is, And How Great Nurses Got Us Here!!
    RetRN77, HazelLPN, and nursel56 like this.
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    Caps are so nostalgic for us dinosaurs and I think we've lost a bit of our prestige and public respect when we gave up our caps/whites. But that's a whole other issue that's probably lost on newer nurses.

    To nurse56 - I remember oh so well, the little black lace doilie 'chapel cap' and we had to keep a unit in our belongings/school desk (so we'd always be ready to go to church). I still have several of my old mantillas, including a gifted real delicate, elaborate lace one from Spain. I hadn't thought of them in a looong time. I find it amazing how activities from Catholic school so long ago are so deeply imprinted in our psyches. (Remember "pagan babies', the 'clicker' used by Sister for processional practice cues, First Friday breakfast of hot cocoa and glazed donurs. et al ???)

    Maybe that head covering thing has piqued my interest in the yamulke (sp?) worn by Jewish men amd the head scarves worn by mid-East women.
    ShariDCST, RetRN77, nursel56, and 1 other like this.
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    Love those collections of nurse's caps show above. It is nice to think that when a nurse wanted her school's cap to rest somewhere for posterity sake.

    There are more than a handful of school caps that are nearly impossible to lay hands on, and those that earned the right to wear them keep it that way! *LOL*

    I mean you would be hard pressed to find a "Bellevue Fluff" in a thirft store or on eBay, it just seems never to happen. Kay's Caps has patterns for hundreds of school caps, even from programs long since defunct, but IIRC certain ones require some sort of proof you actually graduated from the program to place an order.
    ShariDCST, nursel56, and HazelLPN like this.
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    Quote from amoLucia
    Caps are so nostalgic for us dinosaurs and I think we've lost a bit of our prestige and public respect when we gave up our caps/whites. But that's a whole other issue that's probably lost on newer nurses.

    To nurse56 - I remember oh so well, the little black lace doilie 'chapel cap' and we had to keep a unit in our belongings/school desk (so we'd always be ready to go to church). I still have several of my old mantillas, including a gifted real delicate, elaborate lace one from Spain. I hadn't thought of them in a looong time. I find it amazing how activities from Catholic school so long ago are so deeply imprinted in our psyches. (Remember "pagan babies', the 'clicker' used by Sister for processional practice cues, First Friday breakfast of hot cocoa and glazed donurs. et al ???)

    Maybe that head covering thing has piqued my interest in the yamulke (sp?) worn by Jewish men amd the head scarves worn by mid-East women.
    Clickers are still out there! No longer made from just wood they have found new uses including pet training. SitStay Clicker - Dog Supplies_

    Of course the great thing about using a clicker was it allowed giving of instructions without actually speaking. This was a boon not only in classrooms but the original purpose of giving instructions to male or female religous without speaking thus not breaking vows of or the grand slience.
    HazelLPN likes this.
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    Quote from MunoRN
    In the US, these are a common style of cap that endured well into the 20th century, these are Wimple derived caps:

    Again, lay nurses never wore wimples, unless it was during the middle ages or some sort of period when they were in fashion for women in general.

    Veils and coronets again are the likely source: A Nun's Story - YouTube
    ShariDCST, RetRN77, and HazelLPN like this.
  10. 2
    Quote from amoLucia
    To nurse56 - I remember oh so well, the little black lace doilie 'chapel cap' and we had to keep a unit in our belongings/school desk (so we'd always be ready to go to church). I still have several of my old mantillas, including a gifted real delicate, elaborate lace one from Spain. I hadn't thought of them in a looong time. I find iamazing how activities from Catholic school so long ago are so deeply imprinted in our psyches. (Remember "pagan babies' . . .
    Yes, my first grade class bought two (that sounds awful, but they did not use the word "sponsor" then) pagan babies for $50 each. We got to vote on their names. The boy we named "Jesus" and the girl "Maria". As you can tell we were a highly imaginative bunch.

    I remember the clicker and "no meat on Friday" menus but I especially remember the voluminous pockets our nuns had in those black skirts. I used to be transfixed by my 3rd grade teacher Sister Rose. Her pockets were like Mary Poppins carpet bag, when she kept pulling things out, including a lamp as I recall. Mysterious.

    I've noticed many similarities between the garb of religions as well. The Pope wears a cap similar to a yamulke, but I doubt it is called that.
    ShariDCST and HazelLPN like this.


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