No, Caps Are Not Totally Gone - page 13

by DoGoodThenGo 31,295 Views | 176 Comments

Nurse proudly wears the cap that defines her profession If you've visited McKay-Dee Hospital, there's good chance you've seen nurse Linda MacPherson. There are a lot of nurses at the hospital in Ogden, though, so what... Read More


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    Huh? Somebody mention me?

    Oh.. ok.

    I am still thinking I like the paper hat idea. Maybe we should get together, pool our money and develop a system for the next generation of sanitary, sharp Nurses' Caps.





    White paper hats from giant, secured "Dixie Cup Dispensers" at the desk.
    Three styles, RN (Black stripe), LPN (No stripe), Candy/Tech (neon pink stripe or alternate cartoon characters). We could make a bundle.

    We could even do origami versions with pull and fold tabs at the top for various winged and esoteric shapes... ooo and maybe even tyvek versions of some of those "Flo-style" bonnets!
    Last edit by POTR on Jul 2, '10
    HazelLPN, RetRN77, and nursel56 like this.
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    IIRC, towards the last gasps of mandatory caps in the NHS system (UK), paper caps were issued but that didn't stop the things from being got shot of in the end.

    Besides sanitation, it was felt by the governing body that caps hindered proper nursing care on some floors/units because they either got in the way, fell off or otherwise caused a nurse to move in ways that did not go well with proper body mechanics and or patient care.
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    Part of it may also have been the difficulty of keeping them clean and sharp-looking as drip-dry and perma-press fabrics for uniforms displaced cotton items that also would have been ironed and starched as part of a normal laundry routine. I think when Dacron came on the market many hoped they could toss out the iron and never look back, lol.

    I love my collection of vintage household hint and housekeeper books, as well as linens made out of real linen and cotton. You only have to read the directions for making parrafin dips and other concoctions for collars, etc. before you want to faint dead-away on the chaise with a serious case of the vapours.
    HazelLPN, POTR, and RetRN77 like this.
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    I stopped wearing my cap sometime in the 70s. Was working in ICU-CCU and with all the equipment and IV tubing and close quarters it was getting in the way. I remember I used to take it off and set it on the counter outside the patient rooms. Being a possible source of germs was never an issue. But the caps from my school of nursing were difficult to do. One had to wash them and starch and iron and then we stuffed them with toilet paper or plastic to get the correct shape. Ours reminded me of what the pioneer women crossing in their covered wagons wore on their heads. The back part had a draw string one used to gather the material. They were really cool looking and not everyone's turned out the same. It was fun seeing the different caps worn by nurses from various schools of nursing. Even though they were difficult to maintain I feel we have lost something in nursing without the caps.
    Our capping ceremony was special and similar to that described by other posters. It was a candle lite service with the Florence Nightingale lamps and pledge.
    I was recently searching on the web for nursing pins and caps. Very disappointing. Remember how the RN journal had an annual issue in which they showed various school pins? I could not find any web site documenting the history of my school which was started in 1883 and closed sometime in the late 60s. I wonder what happened to all those pictures and brochures! The nursing residence was torn down and the hospital is now condos! That happened after many years of standing vacant and neglected.
    HazelLPN, RetRN77, and elkpark like this.
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    My PN cap is a tiny Kays cap. The orginal cap got knocked behind my computer desk and got coffee spilled on it. Into the trash it went. I went back to the uniform store and got a new one. Excelsior college RN doesn't have caps. Just as well we don't wear them anymore, some demented old person in the ER would probably snatch it off my head and beat me with it!lol And I can't see crawling on the floor chasing an errent tube of blood in a skirt. I would love to wear a skirt and my cap, maybe for nurses week and make everyone at work fall over in hysterics! They think I'm nuts anyway
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    I had to wear a plain white cap during all my clinicals. I actually was rather excited to get my "real" nurses cap at our graduation. I assumed it would have that nice black stripe on it. They handed us a flat piece of cardboard, that still needed to be folded into the shape of a nurses cap. After graduation my Mom asked me, "what was that thing they gave you?" No one could even tell what it was. How disappointing! All my classmates took them to our next class and autographed and lipstick kissed each others caps. They were much nicer decorated than they ever would have been as a nurses cap. Much to cheap to represent all that I expected my cap to mean.
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    There are two or three who work in my hospital who still wear them. I chuckle when I notice that my scrubs don't even match.
    HazelLPN likes this.
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    My mother graduated from RN school in 1973, complete with cap, capping ceremony, lamp, cape, and pin. As a little girl, all I ever wanted was to become a nurse like my mom, and wear that coveted, starched white bit of cotton perched atop her head.

    On June 18, 2011, I will attend my RN pinning ceremony with 52 of my classmates. We will have our dainty white lamps and will receive our school's pin dressed in our proper whites. But no cap. I was heartbroken when I found out. I have begged and pleaded to be allowed to wear one, and have been told no. However, for my portraits, I will be wearing my generic white cap, my starched whites, my pin, and my mother's cap and cape will be displayed beside me.

    I grew up surrounded by nurses in various aspects of the nursing profession. I remember the respect those caps and starched whites engendered. I never saw a patient, no matter how out of touch, doped up, or intoxicated, EVER be disrespectful to a nurse in starched whites. I wish the same could be said of nurses clothed in scrubs. When even the dietary and housekeeping staff wear scrubs, it is very difficult for patients and their families to know who to turn to. Our student nursing uniforms are white tops and hunter green pants, and even we get more respect than the nurses in scrubs. It's something about that white!!

    I don't know, maybe it's my age that has me longing for these things, or maybe it is the fact that I see what our profession is becoming. We are a profession, not a "practice", and we should dress as such. Just my .
    rph3664 and RetRN77 like this.
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    Quote from Bubbles
    I stopped wearing my cap sometime in the 70s. Was working in ICU-CCU and with all the equipment and IV tubing and close quarters it was getting in the way. I remember I used to take it off and set it on the counter outside the patient rooms. Being a possible source of germs was never an issue. But the caps from my school of nursing were difficult to do. One had to wash them and starch and iron and then we stuffed them with toilet paper or plastic to get the correct shape. Ours reminded me of what the pioneer women crossing in their covered wagons wore on their heads. The back part had a draw string one used to gather the material. They were really cool looking and not everyone's turned out the same. It was fun seeing the different caps worn by nurses from various schools of nursing. Even though they were difficult to maintain I feel we have lost something in nursing without the caps.
    Our capping ceremony was special and similar to that described by other posters. It was a candle lite service with the Florence Nightingale lamps and pledge.
    I was recently searching on the web for nursing pins and caps. Very disappointing. Remember how the RN journal had an annual issue in which they showed various school pins? I could not find any web site documenting the history of my school which was started in 1883 and closed sometime in the late 60s. I wonder what happened to all those pictures and brochures! The nursing residence was torn down and the hospital is now condos! That happened after many years of standing vacant and neglected.
    I really wish there was a resource for those issues of either RN or AJN that showed pins and caps, even if they were just scanned online. One year, they featured the pin from my mom's nursing school. It was wonderful, and she was so excited to see it, as when she went there, it was just a small rural school, but the hospital had expanded and become a large teaching center by the time I was finished with school.

    I would love to lay my hands on some of those covers!
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    astarr33, that is beyond sad. I agree with your sentiments. I don't understand what is with nursing schools these days. They have dumped a good bit of nursing history and distinction by the wayside, and have promoted ridiculous ideas about sanitation, caps being hazards, and caps being a symbol of subordination that make me want to retch. Seriously.

    I applaud your portrait idea!
    HazelLPN likes this.


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