NLRB challenges Facebook-related EMT firing - page 2

by TDCHIM 4,466 Views | 18 Comments

The National Labor Relations Board has filed a landmark legal challenge on behalf of an emergency medical technician who was dismissed from her job in part because of critical statements she made about her employer on Facebook.... Read More


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    That is the reason, kids, I do not use facebook. Too many nosey nurses and bosses on facebook!

    (Along with your nurse manager... if you had a private office with internet access and hours of boring paperwork, what would most of you be doing?)

    However, I know it can be cool to keep up with folks.. maybe use forum boards like here and indeed to bash bad employers and facebook just to keep track of folks?

    ...or maybe 2 profiles... one with your real name for a 'corpgov' face to show you are normal and another under a handle for your real friends and family.

    Facebook is now a poor man's spy tool. Add that to Employment at Will, you have a recipe for something bad. It is almost as bad as going to a TV station in the administration's eyes.
    tiredstudentmom and lindarn like this.
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    I don't feel any infringement on my personal life by my employer. Why ? I don't hang out with my coworkers on the weekend and I don't friend them online and talk crap about my job to them. Work and home are supposed to be separate. If employees would do that they could avoid this kind of backlash. I vent HARSHLY and OFTEN about every aspect of my job. I vent to my friends and family over dinner or some other activity. Just like I have done for 15 years with no problems at work. Your boss is all in your personal business because YOU made it public. In a nutshell you should know better. Stop screaming about your privacy when you're posting everything from your weekend plans to pics of you in a bathing suit online. I want to add that I am pro union and anti right-to-fire(work) laws. Common sense should be common right ?
    Spidey's mom, kaliRN, and lindarn like this.
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    This brings up other issues as well I just thought of that may not be readily apparent as bad mouthing the boss or posting pictures of yourself holding a rat you caught at a facilities NICU..

    *Put "Like" under the cause of NORML because you think pot laws are stupid? Maybe we should "random drug test" this person.
    *Mention you play video games or MMOs? Maybe we should not hire this person because if they waste time at home, they waste time on the job.
    *Put a religion not in vogue like atheist, wicca, put-your-minority belief here? We do not trust anyone who is not such and such religion.. or what is wrong with this person..
    *Your work history on FB not match your application? Maybe the employee is a liar and needs to be fired for being untruthful during employment process.
    *You have a bunch of folks on Friends' List that are not 'acceptable'? Maybe you are not.

    Oh.. and deleting your FB will not work. Sites like wayback machine and internet archive stores this.....forever!
    lindarn likes this.
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    I think the major problem with these people is that their Facebook profiles are not private enough to the public, they are not monitoring their friends list too well, and they are not using the selective posting feature at all. My Facebook profile is severely locked down to non-friends (even removed the Request Friend button, so that if you want to be my friend you have to literally send me a message), and I have even blocked my boss' profile from finding mine. Also if I am gonna rant about my job, I am only going to broadcast it to my friends that won't remotely know to have it get back to my boss. If you use Facebook smartly, there is no problem.
    nurse0520, Spidey's mom, lindarn, and 3 others like this.
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    This does not surprise me at all. I think folks are QUITE casual and not using their critical thinking skills when posting some items on Facebook. Making an unpleasant reference to some aspect of a patient's personality or the way they are dealing with their current illness, in a public (or semi -public) forum is NOT PROFESSIONAL!!!!
    I even question ANY posting from work. Actually I am wondering how many facilities just block the FB application, if that is even possible.
    Anybody have FB blocked by your employer? Kind of interested to know.
    lindarn likes this.
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    Quote from llerkl
    Actually I am wondering how many facilities just block the FB application, if that is even possible.
    Anybody have FB blocked by your employer? Kind of interested to know.
    The hospital where I volunteer does block Facebook and similar sites from their employee network access. However, free WiFi there available to patients and the public (password changed monthly) does allow access, go figure.
    lindarn likes this.
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    Quote from llerkl
    This does not surprise me at all. I think folks are QUITE casual and not using their critical thinking skills when posting some items on Facebook. Making an unpleasant reference to some aspect of a patient's personality or the way they are dealing with their current illness, in a public (or semi -public) forum is NOT PROFESSIONAL!!!!
    I even question ANY posting from work. Actually I am wondering how many facilities just block the FB application, if that is even possible.
    Anybody have FB blocked by your employer? Kind of interested to know.

    I'm more interested in the fact that the individual in this suit made these comments to work friends during off-hours and outside of the workplace, and was still canned for her comments. Yes, you can make your Facebook settings extremely private and simply not friend anyone from work or set up a secondary "professional" profile. The question in my mind is, should you have to in order to avoid punitive action by your employer?

    Should your employer have the right to discipline you for calling your supervisor a jerk during your off-work hours on your Facebook page? If you called your supervisor a jerk in a bar (or a prayer group, for that matter!) after work, should your employer be able to discipline you for that? Making your settings private only addresses some of the symptoms of the main issue. But we as a society have to decide how much control employers should have over their employees' outside-the-workplace activities and actions.
    lindarn and tiredstudentmom like this.
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    Quote from TDCHIM
    I'm more interested in the fact that the individual in this suit made these comments to work friends during off-hours and outside of the workplace, and was still canned for her comments. Yes, you can make your Facebook settings extremely private and simply not friend anyone from work or set up a secondary "professional" profile. The question in my mind is, should you have to in order to avoid punitive action by your employer?

    Should your employer have the right to discipline you for calling your supervisor a jerk during your off-work hours on your Facebook page? If you called your supervisor a jerk in a bar (or a prayer group, for that matter!) after work, should your employer be able to discipline you for that? Making your settings private only addresses some of the symptoms of the main issue. But we as a society have to decide how much control employers should have over their employees' outside-the-workplace activities and actions.
    You are exactly right on with your post. What you are seeing in this case is an employer overstepping their boundaries...bigtime. If you are of the opinion that just because they pay you to do a job that they are entitled to critique virtually any aspect of your private life then I'm fairly certain China could use some new workers. Once you are off the clock, that's it.
    The saddest part is that people who are unaffected "at the moment" simply turn away and nothing is done. This issue isn't going away, and the more everyone ignores it, the more employers will make every attempt to get away with it. This issue should serve as a rallying cry - not just for the EMS worker(s) involved, but to anyone who's ever said anything about their employer...ever.

    You are the employees. You are the engine that runs an organization. As that engine, you are subjected to the stresses that the work brings. Sometimes you are appreciated and shown that you are valued, other times you may be talked down to or treated as if your contribution means nothing. And if any of you think you're not entitled to your opinion about your employer then I have to disagree. It shouldn't matter whether you discuss your opinion with a coworker, a relative, or your boss.

    It is true that most of the time when we vent, it's about something bad that's happened. You are entitled to it, whether here on allnurses, or on facebook if that is where you wish to post it. I personally disagree with "calling out" specific people in your organization as that woman did, but a related post discussing the events that upset you is not outside of reasonable expectation.

    Sorry to ramble on. My point is simply this: Your employer expects you to do a job. You clock in, do your job, and go home. What you do at home....as long as no laws are broken...is your business and yours alone. But far too often, employers think that they have a say in the things you are allowed to do at home, too. It's time to put a stop to this infringement of your rights. She stated her opinion about her supervisor, and for that she deserves to be fired? Seriously? But unfortunately that's the world we've let ourself live in, the fear of retribution if we say the wrong thing. And that sets a dangerous precedent for every employee everywhere.

    I say what I need to say, just not necessarily in the way I want to say it. Think about this: would it have been any less or more damaging if she had called him an @sshole instead of the code for a pysch patient? Why?
    Chico David RN and lindarn like this.
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    Quote from TDCHIM
    I'm more interested in the fact that the individual in this suit made these comments to work friends during off-hours and outside of the workplace, and was still canned for her comments. Yes, you can make your Facebook settings extremely private and simply not friend anyone from work or set up a secondary "professional" profile. The question in my mind is, should you have to in order to avoid punitive action by your employer?

    Should your employer have the right to discipline you for calling your supervisor a jerk during your off-work hours on your Facebook page? If you called your supervisor a jerk in a bar (or a prayer group, for that matter!) after work, should your employer be able to discipline you for that? Making your settings private only addresses some of the symptoms of the main issue. But we as a society have to decide how much control employers should have over their employees' outside-the-workplace activities and actions.
    NO. But you are naive' if you think they won't. Its up to you to decide how to handle it. I believe that people who have to live on their jobs 24/7 by having best friends from work are asking for the negative side of a 24 hour work life. Employees seem to want to bring their work life into their private life when it suits them and then scream for privacy when it comes back to bite them. Makes no sense. And FYI, it is extremely unprofessional to consistently bad mouth your employer to other employees AT ANY TIME. It creates a poisonous environment. I am not a supervisor BTW.
    lindarn likes this.


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