New York State Panel Calls For Hospital Changes

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    A New York state panel called Monday for sweeping changes that expand the state's authority to assume control over troubled hospitals and also recommended the mergers of several troubled Brooklyn medical centers.


    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...googlenews_wsj
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  3. 4 Comments so far...

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    Does anyone actually have access to this article? Not that you should post the whole thing here, but maybe just the key points/specific Bklyn hospitals mentioned?

    It's behind the WSJ paywall...
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    Just use a little initiative and go over to "Google" (or any good search engine), then search using keywords "hospital, Brooklyn, Brookdale, New York", amoung a few should get you there.

    Thought the link above now is behind a paywall true, the OP is still up and was easily found again by moi.

    Not sure how kosher this is, however I'll do it, but I'll probably hate myself in the morning. *LOL*


    "A New York state panel called Monday for sweeping changes that expand the state's authority to assume control over troubled hospitals and also recommended the mergers of several troubled Brooklyn medical centers.
    The report was the culmination of a six-month effort by the state Department of Health to assess the finances of Brooklyn hospitals that have taken on staggering amounts of debt to remain open. The hospitals serve mostly the poor who use Medicaid insurance and patients who overly rely on costly emergency services for basic medical care.
    The panel—part of Gov. Andrew Cuomo's effort to overhaul the Medicaid system—recommended to the state that Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center take over Brookdale Hospital Medical Center, while Brooklyn Hospital Center would assume leadership over Interfaith Medical Center and Wyckoff Heights Hospital.
    The three hospitals being taken over have a combined long-term debt of $276 million, according to the panel. The state is contractually obligated to back the vast majority of that debt if hospitals fail to repay.
    The most controversial recommendation in an 11-page report would give the state's health commissioner power to replace ineffective hospital board members and install new management at "facilities that present a danger to the health or safety of their patients."
    Weak governance, the panel found, was a key problem for Brooklyn hospitals.
    "The one really visible difference has been the governance" from hospital board members who failed to evaluate financial and clinical performance and also failed to set goals to improve them, Stephen Berger, chairman of the Brooklyn Work Group, said in an interview. If governance from hospital board members were improved, "we might not see some of these hospitals that are in terrible trouble."
    The state Health Department expressed concerns about Brookdale's management in 2009, when its parent company, Medisys Health Network, was run by chief executive David Rosen, but regulators could do nothing about it. Mr. Rosen was convicted this year in a corruption scheme.
    "That is one example where the governance issue is very serious," Mr. Berger said.
    The panel's report questioned the assertion of many hospital executives that rising medical expenses and inadequate public support have left poorer, urban hospitals short-changed. The boards of some Brooklyn hospitals "have adopted a strategy that seeks merely to be the last man standing in their communities," the report said.
    The panel recommendations are advisory, and legislation to expand the powers of the health commissioner would likely face opposition.
    Kenneth Raske, president of the Greater New York Hospital Association, said in a statement that hospitals "will work to ensure that any new legislation does not give the Department of Health excessive powers that could ultimately undermine a hospital's ability to deliver care to its community."
    The health commissioner, Nirav Shah, will be reaching out to local elected officials and hospital administrators about the recommendations soon, state officials said.
    Brooklyn hospitals have been under increased pressure to remake how they do business in order to survive. Six facilities in the borough "do not have a business model and sufficient margins to remain viable," the report said. "Three of these hospitals, Interfaith, Brookdale, and Wyckoff are experiencing financial crises and require aggressive action."
    The merger plans have been discussed for weeks. While Kingsbrook and Brooklyn Hospital also have financial problems, the panel said their leadership was strong and finances in better shape than other institutions.
    The panel offered few specifics about the mergers, and it remained unclear which services at each hospital would continue and whether their names would change.
    "We look forward to sharing our experience in serving a high-need community in a fiscally responsible manner," said Linda Brady, chief executive of Kingsbrook, in a statement.
    A MediSys spokesman said it would "work toward a long term viability plan for the future of Brookdale Hospital." An Interfaith spokeswoman said the hospital saw "the logic of the consolidation." Officials with Brooklyn and Wyckoff Hospital couldn't be reached. "
    Last edit by DoGoodThenGo on Nov 30, '11 : Reason: Quotation marks added
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    Yes, I have in fact heard of Google. I just kept running into the original WSJ post behind the paywall.

    Thanks for posting the article...I heard that Wyckoff Heights was the only hospital that NYC homebirth midwives could transfer women to after the closure of St. Vincent's. Not that any of the midwives I've spoken to had great things to say about Wyckoff Heights, but I wonder if they will have to find yet another transfer hospital if it merges with Brooklyn Hospital Center.
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    Quote from LookingAhead
    Yes, I have in fact heard of Google. I just kept running into the original WSJ post behind the paywall.

    Thanks for posting the article...I heard that Wyckoff Heights was the only hospital that NYC homebirth midwives could transfer women to after the closure of St. Vincent's. Not that any of the midwives I've spoken to had great things to say about Wyckoff Heights, but I wonder if they will have to find yet another transfer hospital if it merges with Brooklyn Hospital Center.
    Home birthing and or midwives are *not* popular with much of the NYC medical establishment, which is one reason why St. Vinny's former patients and staff had such a hard time lining up a new gig for their service.

    St. Vincent's had a great lying in hospital that was separate from the main building which was very well used and loved, but it closed several years before the hospital and sold off all equipment due to cost of malpractice insurance.

    The midwives aren't alone in not having anything good to say about Wyckoff.


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