New York poised to require bachelor's degrees for RNs - pg.16 | allnurses

New York poised to require bachelor's degrees for RNs - page 20

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  1. Visit  talaxandra profile page
    3
    Thanks for reopening the thread

    My nursing experience, though long, is relatively narrow - with the exception of my (hospital-based) rotations to other institutions, my entire career has been at the tertiary hospital where I currently work, and most of that time I've been on a variation of the same ward. We've moved several times, and added units, but kept significant continuity of staff, so that though the average age of nurses at my hospital's 27, there are four nurses I work with who've been on my ward longer than my 18 years there.

    All of this is a prelude to saying that I've never seen anything at work, or heard about from colleagues (who've worked the legnth and breadth of Australia) that comes close to the division there seems to be in the US between differently-educated nurses.

    Given that we've relatively recently reintroduced our LPN equivalents into acute care, it's not that there is tension between different roles, levels of education and degrees of accountability.

    I have to wonder if it's because we transitioned from hospital certificate to tertiary diploma to degree with a minimum of debate and no real opposition, so long ago that the current registration requirement is all many of the workforce here have ever known.
    anniv91106, rn/writer, and lindarn like this.
  2. Visit  anniv91106 profile page
    1
    Quote from talaxandra
    Thanks for reopening the thread

    My nursing experience, though long, is relatively narrow - with the exception of my (hospital-based) rotations to other institutions, my entire career has been at the tertiary hospital where I currently work, and most of that time I've been on a variation of the same ward. We've moved several times, and added units, but kept significant continuity of staff, so that though the average age of nurses at my hospital's 27, there are four nurses I work with who've been on my ward longer than my 18 years there.

    All of this is a prelude to saying that I've never seen anything at work, or heard about from colleagues (who've worked the legnth and breadth of Australia) that comes close to the division there seems to be in the US between differently-educated nurses.

    Given that we've relatively recently reintroduced our LPN equivalents into acute care, it's not that there is tension between different roles, levels of education and degrees of accountability.

    I have to wonder if it's because we transitioned from hospital certificate to tertiary diploma to degree with a minimum of debate and no real opposition, so long ago that the current registration requirement is all many of the workforce here have ever known.
    What was the motivation to reintroduce LPN equivilents into acute care?
    lindarn likes this.
  3. Visit  talaxandra profile page
    2
    The reintroduction of EN's to acute care went hand in hand with a program extending EN's scope of practice, accountability and responsibility, and increasing the length of study by six month, from a year to eighteen months. An overwhelming majority of EN's go on to a degree and qualify as registered nurses, in part because career and pay prospects are limited.

    The main factor in this move was a shortage of RN's, nationwide. Thanks to the introduction of ratios in Victoria, we have adequate nursing numbers but, thanks to budgetary cuts, have lost 500 graduate places for next year and are currently in negotiation with the government, who want to bring patient assistants into acute care, a move that is being hotly contested by nurses, who start industiral action tomorrow morning.
    lindarn and LockportRN like this.
  4. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    [quote=talaxandra;5858231]All of this is a prelude to saying that I've never seen anything at work, or heard about from colleagues (who've worked the legnth and breadth of Australia) that comes close to the division there seems to be in the US between differently-educated nurses. e]

    *** This division only exsists here and other non-care enviroments. Im my 16 years in nurisng I have never observed or heard of any divisions or friction between nurses with different education backgrounds in the hospital.
  5. Visit  talaxandra profile page
    1
    Thanks, PMFB - that's really interesting. Given how strongly members who post about it here seem to feel, I wonder if it's hidden at work because it's not culturally appropriate to discuss in the work place, or if the anonymity of the internet allows rapid and heated polarisation of opinions.
    Fiona59 likes this.


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