New York & New Jersey Considering Mandatory BSN For Entry - page 2

by DoGoodThenGo

16,453 Views | 72 Comments

It has been over 40 years since the ANA issued it's position paper regarding making the BSN mandatory for entry into the profession. Now pending bills in the states of New Jersey and New York, if passed and signed into law would... Read More


  1. 2
    I agree that getting your ASN first is much cheaper - that is why I did that as I stated, but I still think that for those who can afford to, just getting a BSN from the start is the best path if it is available to you by location and funds, especially if they pass this law down the road. My former teachers always stated that nursing will never be taken seriously as a profession until we are required to have BSN minimum, and actually a MSN minimum like most of the other health care careers. Some docs are never going to take nurses seriously as long as they have a PhD, and we "only" have an ASN.

    BTW I drove an hour each way to class, plus an hours drive was my closest clinical site - I even had some hospitals that were almost 2 hours away and we had to be there by 6:30am. And that was for an ASN.
    OC_An Khe and
  2. 2
    North Dakota's mandatory BSN law suffered on several fronts, and IIRC was passed in 1985 and began in 1986, repealed in 2003, not exactly "short order". Maine was the only other state to pass laws regarding entry into practice (BSN for professional nursing, ADN for associate nursing), but due to various problems it was never enacted.

    ND's effort failed because of mainly two reasons: lack of support from those in the state's nursing community, and the fact no other state, especially those bordering on ND did not have same requirement.

    Two and three year programs were phased out in North Dakota, however those wishing to become nurses and not attend a BSN program simply went over to border states such as Minnesota to attend ADN programs. Part of the original proposal would have allowed ADN nurses to sit for the board, and obtain a license, however they would have to get a BSN within 8 years, but this was not included in the final law.

    What NYS proposes is rather a sane approach as it realises not everyone is in the position to go for the BSN at once.

    Anyway, regardless of what state BONs are doing, the market place is slowly moving towards BSN anyway. The military and the VA already require a BSN, and many hospitals/other clinicial settings are slowly moving that way as well.

    Yes, one knows we have been dancing around the barn on this issue for over forty years, but the fact still remains nursing is unique amoung the professions in that it has several paths to entry.
    NRSKarenRN and Moogie like this.
  3. 0
    Quote from tuttle13
    T
    I think if these laws go through, you will eventually see the end of the ADN/ASN program. I don't think many people will do the ADN first if they know they will have to get a BSN in 10 years anyway. It takes almost 4 years to get your ADN if you do your pre-req's part time, so why not just do the BSN program if you are going to be required to anyway? I wish I did my BSN from the start, although the cost would have been much higher.
    As you say the reason is MONEY HONEY, BSN programs have two prices, expensive to ghastly expensive. While many ADN programs are quite reasonable, especially if they are government sponsered, if you spread two years out over four years it spreads the cost also. In addition, ADN programs are usually quite flexable and can fit into the lives of adult returning students very well. In the past BSN programs were not flexable, but I think that may be changing. They could just do what the Diploma school around here did, there credits go right into a University program that they are associated with.
  4. 2
    My BSN program wasn't too expensive, with credits costing a lil over $100/each. My most expensive semester was under $1800. I definitely thing I was fortunate to go to school in Nevada. Now that I live in Washington and look at UW or WSU for future education, I'm amazed that the cost is 4-6 times what I paid per credit
  5. 0
    This will take some major pull in Albany and Trenton to pass. I doubt this will take into effect though. Do not under estimate the lobbying efforts of community colleges and small hospitals. Also, in some parts of NY the only schools within reasonable distance and economically viable is a community college. The University that offered a BSN degree in the area shut down their Nursing program last year.
    I plan to get my Masters in the field but it's my choice since I want options in the future. I know nurses with over 20+ years of experience who only have Associates and they are happy with they are doing now.
  6. 0
    It's been a requirement here in Newfoundland Canada for a few years. The nurses association made this choice because they stated that all nurses have to have extensive clinical and academic mental health and community health nursing in order to be licensed here. All the diploma program nurses have been "grandfathered" in to the system.
  7. 0
    Quote from geekgolightly
    Money. Money is the reason a person would choose an ADN. I had no money for a university so I chose a community college. I paid approx $500 a semester for tuition and then books were an extra couple hundred each semester. No way in heck could I have ever afforded a university with my (very small) wages.

    That's the main reason I'm taking that route. I go to a community college and am working on my ADN. Based on my GPA so far, my NET scores, etc. my advisors have all told me I should transfer to one of the local universities here that have good BSN programs and just go for that outright. But I just dont have the money to do it. Plus I already have a B.S. (in another field) that I can use to get my MSN after I become an RN. If I'd had the funds, and no debt, I probably would have just gone for the BSN to begin with......
    Last edit by AZ_LPN_8_26_13 on Sep 8, '09 : Reason: typo
  8. 12
    Quote from geekgolightly
    Money. Money is the reason a person would choose an ADN. I had no money for a university so I chose a community college. I paid approx $500 a semester for tuition and then books were an extra couple hundred each semester. No way in heck could I have ever afforded a university with my (very small) wages.
    Don't individuals who go into PT, OT, Pharmacy, SLP, all have to consider $$$ when they decide on their career path? Yet, in spite of post gradate degrees needed for entry into practice from the get go, they have record numbers of applicants to their programs. Why is that? Because they know that they WILL get a high paying job, far more than nursing, and not have to put up with the same BS that nurses do.

    Why don't they have to put up with all of the BS? Because they ALL HAVE THE SAME LEVEL OF EDUCATION BEFORE THEY ENTER THE PROFESSION! The don't have the division that different levels of education have done to nursing. And he powers that be have made sure that it continues. They are unified, and are in control of their profession, as nursing never will if we allow ourselves to continue in the same path.

    While I am at it, LPNs and LVNs need an educational makeover. PT ASSISTANTS, have a two year Associates Degree as entry into practice. All to walk patients around, and do ROM. Nothing that they do or don't do, are considered life threatenting. Yet they out educate us in many ways. It is time for nurses to think about what is best for NURSING, not the individual!

    No one in nursing seems to get it. Think out side the box. Fewer nurses coming out of school, mean less competition for the jobs that are out there. And a single level of education will unify us as it has other health care professionals. JMHO and my NY $0.02.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington.
  9. 2
    Quote from tuttle13
    i agree that getting your asn first is much cheaper - that is why i did that as i stated, but i still think that for those who can afford to, just getting a bsn from the start is the best path if it is available to you by location and funds, especially if they pass this law down the road. my former teachers always stated that nursing will never be taken seriously as a profession until we are required to have bsn minimum, and actually a msn minimum like most of the other health care careers. some docs are never going to take nurses seriously as long as they have a phd, and we "only" have an asn.

    btw i drove an hour each way to class, plus an hours drive was my closest clinical site - i even had some hospitals that were almost 2 hours away and we had to be there by 6:30am. and that was for an asn.
    until nurses stand up for themselfs they will never be taken as a professional. don's need to stand up and refused to keep adding non-nursing duties to them. until that time us nurses will be looked at as non-professionals. being an er nurse working closely with physicians they also state until nurses act professional, speak in professional terms etc. it will be hard for physicians to see us a professionals.

    you where lucky that you where able to drive they way you did. not everyone can, most people who are entering the nursing profession are older, are working & have families. you can say all you want about family support, but you still have to spend time with your kids.
    lindarn and
  10. 0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    North Dakota's mandatory BSN law suffered on several fronts, and IIRC was passed in 1985 and began in 1986, repealed in 2003, not exactly "short order". Maine was the only other state to pass laws regarding entry into practice (BSN for professional nursing, ADN for associate nursing), but due to various problems it was never enacted.

    ND's effort failed because of mainly two reasons: lack of support from those in the state's nursing community, and the fact no other state, especially those bordering on ND did not have same requirement.

    Two and three year programs were phased out in North Dakota, however those wishing to become nurses and not attend a BSN program simply went over to border states such as Minnesota to attend ADN programs. Part of the original proposal would have allowed ADN nurses to sit for the board, and obtain a license, however they would have to get a BSN within 8 years, but this was not included in the final law.

    What NYS proposes is rather a sane approach as it realises not everyone is in the position to go for the BSN at once.

    Anyway, regardless of what state BONs are doing, the market place is slowly moving towards BSN anyway. The military and the VA already require a BSN, and many hospitals/other clinicial settings are slowly moving that way as well.

    Yes, one knows we have been dancing around the barn on this issue for over forty years, but the fact still remains nursing is unique amoung the professions in that it has several paths to entry.
    The VA does not require you to have a BSN to be a floor nurse. To get into anytime of management position you need a BSN. The military requires a BSN (execpt the Army Reserve) because you are an officer first which requires a 4 year degree.


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