New NYC anti-teen pregnancy campaign....are they being too harsh, or just enough? - page 4

by uRNmyway

5,337 Views | 41 Comments

Critics blast NYC's anti-teen pregnancy campaign Just read this article. And I have to admit I am kind of conflicted. On the one hand...Studies have been done showing so many negative repercussions on children born to teen... Read More


  1. 4
    Quote from Ashley, PICU RN
    I understand what you're saying, but the difference is that both the "don't have sex" and the "use birth control" approach address teen pregnancy before it actually happens. These ads address it after it has occurred or even after the child has been born.
    I truly wonder if we're looking at the same ads ...

    I don't find this campaign offensive at all. I watched the video a second time, and what I see the ads targeting is the subculture of teens who think that avoiding pregnancy may be ideal, but if you do happen to get pregnant ... it will be OK. No, it's not statistically likely to be OK, and that, IMO, is what the ads highlight.
    elkpark, azhiker96, Spidey's mom, and 1 other like this.
  2. 0
    Quote from Altra
    The difference in those subcultures is marriage. There, I said it.
    Valid point, but these ads conflate pregnancies to teenagers whether they're married or not. The ads are judgmental and shaming to teen parents even if they're married. With people roaming the streets from so many different cultures, the ads are offensive.
  3. 0
    Quote from priorities2
    Valid point, but these ads conflate pregnancies to teenagers whether they're married or not. The ads are judgmental and shaming to teen parents even if they're married. With people roaming the streets from so many different cultures, the ads are offensive.

    So should the ads have a disclaimer or something?

    "If you come from a culture where early pregnancy is acceptable, or if you are married to the parent of your child/child-to-be, please disregard the above message, it doesn't apply to you."

  4. 2
    I will be honest--when I was in high school, there were girls getting pregnant and having babies. I envied them because the part I saw was everyone gushing over them and the baby; they got to do home schooling; etc. But, not too long after, I started college; started watching small children (including babies) and I began to appreciate being able to be around them and then, being able give them back to the parents!! Plus, I got paid.

    I think teens who want babies should have to volunteer to rock the withdrawing babies at the hospitals when they are born (so, they can get used to the constant crying) and also, do volunteer babysitting (or just babysitting period). Having your own kid...you do not get paid for; actually, if you want to go out and don't have support...you pay out. Parenthood is a 24/7 job. There's no giving the kid back.
    elkpark and uRNmyway like this.
  5. 0
    Completely agree. Did you ever see those episodes of Maury (Shhhh...don't tell anyone I watch that stuff!!) where you have these teens frantically trying to get pregnant? He makes them responsible for a baby or toddler for like 24 hours and most of them decide they aren't ready for it after all.
    And all they've had to do is provide physical care. Imagine when they realize the financial and emotional aspect, on top of being responsible for shaping these little people?
  6. 1
    I am not generally a fan of shaming young people who are victims of their own poor judgement and probably a lack of support and poor parenting themselves, but I far from offended. I think the ads are fairly dumb and will probably not have much impact on the target audience who are impulsive and believe nothing will ever happen to them: "pregnancy, herpes and the clap only happens to other kids. Besides, it's just this once, we'll get condoms next time."

    I can't tell you how many young women I have put on some kind of birth control only to refer them for an OB provider or an abortion within the year. At least 2 dozen, and I've been in practice less than 4 years. And yeah, I teach them how to use it! Teens are by definition, dumb, irresponsible and impulsive. The do dumb, irresponsible and impulsive stuff. That stuff sometimes has major consequences. Shaming them for it doesn't do anyone a damn bit of good. I don't see the point. Waste of money/resources that would be better directed in a myriad of ways, IMO.
    priorities2 likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from Jeweles26
    So should the ads have a disclaimer or something?

    "If you come from a culture where early pregnancy is acceptable, or if you are married to the parent of your child/child-to-be, please disregard the above message, it doesn't apply to you."

    Public health campaigns should be culturally sensitive, not culturally insensitive with a disclaimer.
  8. 1
    Quote from priorities2

    Public health campaigns should be culturally sensitive, not culturally insensitive with a disclaimer.
    I know, I was being sarcastic because of previous comments regarding cultures where young pregnancy is 'normal'
    priorities2 likes this.
  9. 1
    I like the ads, and would be happy to see more of them. While I'm not a fan of shaming pregnant teens for the sake of shaming them, IMO, we've gone 'waay too far in the opposite direct, of normalizing teen pregnancy out of wedlock. I'm sure there are plenty of teen mothers who "beat the odds" and they and their children turn out fine, and I congratulate them for making the best of a bad situation, but that's not the majority and I think it's only fair to be honest about that.
    Altra likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    I like the ads, and would be happy to see more of them. While I'm not a fan of shaming pregnant teens for the sake of shaming them, IMO, we've gone 'waay too far in the opposite direct, of normalizing teen pregnancy out of wedlock. I'm sure there are plenty of teen mothers who "beat the odds" and they and their children turn out fine, and I congratulate them for making the best of a bad situation, but that's not the majority and I think it's only fair to be honest about that.
    Because, clearly, being *married* makes teen pregnancy all the better.

    /it doesn't, btw


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