New model for patient care- Hospital at home

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    This new model of patient care (explained at clinicallyhome.com) allows patients who have easily treatable diseases such as pneumonia, DVT, asthma and cellulitis to stay home under the program called "Hospital at Home". They receive daily physician and nursing visits along with all the equipment needed. The web site explains the process. Check it out and share what you think.
    leslie :-D likes this.
  2. 13 Comments so far...

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    here is the link for clinically home.
    www.clincallyhome.com

    and here is a comprehensive article about "hospital at home" programs.
    In Focus - The Commonwealth Fund

    a large component of this program depends on telemedicine.
    i am wondering how they respond to codes promptly and efficiently.

    leslie
  4. 0
    Only a good idea if it's better than what these guys got going ...keep reading past the "employer's stellar review of self, lol" I was stunned with some of these comments, they advertise heavily in my area.
    Mobile Doctors Reviews | Glassdoor
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    I think the idea is fabulous for some of our pts. seriously how many of my patients are just getting 3 to 4 rounds of iv abx a day. I think for them it would be ideal to be at home. but i think of most of our cellulitus pts, overweight and old.......i don't think its realistic for them to be at home with just cna/nursing visits i could see a lot of falls/injuries happening. this would only be ideal for fairly independent people.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
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    I hope the physician in the ER who orders hospital at home does a thorough job of assessing the patient. The real hospital floors are all going to have very high acuity if these "easier" patients are at home.
  7. 0
    Everything old is new again.

    Right through the 1950's or so it was not uncommon for those with means to avoid a hospital stay and simply have equipment and staff up to and including round the clock nursing care provided by a LPN or RN. One British monarch had rooms of Buckingham Palace turned into an OR and recovery suite so he could be operated on "at home".
  8. 0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Everything old is new again.

    Right through the 1950's or so it was not uncommon for those with means to avoid a hospital stay and simply have equipment and staff up to and including round the clock nursing care provided by a LPN or RN. One British monarch had rooms of Buckingham Palace turned into an OR and recovery suite so he could be operated on "at home".

    Interesting, I had no idea. Thanks for sharing!
  9. 0
    Quote from lovinlife11
    Interesting, I had no idea. Thanks for sharing!
    You've never seen those old films were someone became very ill and you knew things were critical when a physican was summoned and then came the whole schabang of equipment. Oxygen tents, O2 canisters, etc.. and a nurse in starched whites with cap who was "engaged" to provide care.

    Have long since chucked them away, but when I was younger older relatives who were nurses and or others gave one tons of old nursing text books from the 1940's through 1960's. In most there were sections about providing what would be called "home care" today. Then it was more commonly known as "private duty" and could involve anything from new mother and infant to end of life (COPD, cancer, etc..) care. One book had a chapter on what to do once a patient expired (sorry, appears to no longer to be breathing), up to and including preparing the body for the undertakers to take away. Got as far as plugging up various orifices and quickly moved on.

    When you think about it modern hospitals exsist mainly to provide skilled professional nursing care. If one has the funds equip one's home and hire the staff there is much that could be done in that setting.

    Saw a French program a few months back where local hospitals in France are sending out nurses to provide care for patients in their homes, rather than have them go to hospital. One patient covered in the show was a young boy with cancer who receives his chemo and other treatments at home via nurse visits. His mother stated her son was much more comfortable with the arrangement then when they had to go to hospital. IIRC the government is trying this out as a cost cutting move but also to see if it provides better patient care.
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    I would totally be interested in being an infusion nurse.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  11. 0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo

    You've never seen those old films were someone became very ill and you knew things were critical when a physican was summoned and then came the whole schabang of equipment. Oxygen tents, O2 canisters, etc.. and a nurse in starched whites with cap who was "engaged" to provide care.

    Have long since chucked them away, but when I was younger older relatives who were nurses and or others gave one tons of old nursing text books from the 1940's through 1960's. In most there were sections about providing what would be called "home care" today. Then it was more commonly known as "private duty" and could involve anything from new mother and infant to end of life (COPD, cancer, etc..) care. One book had a chapter on what to do once a patient expired (sorry, appears to no longer to be breathing), up to and including preparing the body for the undertakers to take away. Got as far as plugging up various orifices and quickly moved on.

    When you think about it modern hospitals exsist mainly to provide skilled professional nursing care. If one has the funds equip one's home and hire the staff there is much that could be done in that setting.

    Saw a French program a few months back where local hospitals in France are sending out nurses to provide care for patients in their homes, rather than have them go to hospital. One patient covered in the show was a young boy with cancer who receives his chemo and other treatments at home via nurse visits. His mother stated her son was much more comfortable with the arrangement then when they had to go to hospital. IIRC the government is trying this out as a cost cutting move but also to see if it provides better patient care.
    I actually don't watch tv or movies, even as a kid. Interesting info though!


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