New Generation of Nurses 'Too Posh to Wash' - page 2

A new generation of nurses who are "too posh to wash" are threatening traditional nursing practices by refusing to perform basic tasks, the leader of Britain's nurses' union, Beverly Malone, said... Read More

  1. by   fergus51
    Quote from Susy K
    BWAH!
    At least someone got it
  2. by   Gldngrl
    Quote from KMSRN
    I agree with mrdoc2005. If your nurses are routinely bathing all patients, it is a waste of resources. I enjoy bathing patients and cleaning sh** doesn't bother me at all, however that is a task that can easily be delegated. The value of the registered nurse is in assessment and coordination of care. There are times when it is perfectly appropriate and/or necessary for nurses to perform these tasks but in this area nurses make considerably more than $18/hr - very high priced aides! If nurses are refusing to clean and care for patients who need help just because they are nurses and not aides, that is a different situation that needs to be addressed.
    Love to have the help, but in the hosp 12 hr nights where I'm employed, it's primary nursing, no techs on shift. We (nursing) do everything.
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Wow if I had to quit wiping butts, I guess I would be out of a job in OB. I don't mind; it's part of what I do. I am certainly neither "posh" or "too good" for this. It's part of what I do as primary nurse in OB. I am a fairly new nurse compared to the gals with 25, 30 years preceding me in OB. I know of no one I work with "too posh" to clean up, "old" or "young".

    And I appreciate the new generation coming into nursing; I am reassured and excited to see how intelligent, assertive and gifted many of these younger people are. I have hope, in other words!!!!

    ROFLMAO at fergus!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on May 12, '04
  4. by   leslie :-D
    no, i don't do pericare routinely but to say/think/act like it's beneath me????? :imbar :angryfire ...i say get out of nursing 'cause you just don't have a clue on what it's about. hmmmph.
  5. by   nursemike
    A little lesson I learned the hard way during my second clinical: some patients are able to do their own pericare! Yet another example of the importance of good assessment.
  6. by   angelique777
    I wondered if the issue is one more of time management and making sure as a nurse you delegate appropriately your duties. I am new and from what I can see other duties such as meds, foley's suctioning, wound care and other duties take up most of the day. If nurse assistants are available it makes sense that to do the other duties is not what the RN is there for. However, even though I said that in the time I have been in the hospital I make extra sheets and have them ready at bedside, and I do best i can to make sure not only that my patient is clean and comfortable and room is clean and safe all that is a nurses duty but delegating duties is also an important duty.If I see my patient in need of change I tend to do the change and wound care at the same time. However, one day while doing my preceptorship I had 8 very demanding patients each had a lot of meds and changing a patient who did pooh was not a priority I had to delegate it to the aide. I had two patients who sugar levels had dropped very low and I had to watch them and give out other meds all before 10am or at least near that time along with other duties. So maybe the patient will think that I am ignoring them or think I am to posh to wash but that was not the case. I also have done a rotation on a vent unit , the hospital was set up to facilitate having supplies easily available often the aide and RN changed client together particularly since patient is often in a coma or not able to move so the combination of how the rooms where set up so sheets where at the door of each room plus supplies that made time management easier. So I think it has to be a balanced criticism since as a new person I most certainly do not want to leave a person without comfort but I would hate not to do something that would endanger someone because I stopped to wash pooh and meanwhile other patient went into diabetic shock or other problem. I am new so I could be wrong so as time goes on I will learn how to balance all the duties as best I can and that is always my prayer to God that I serve as best I can the people in my care and that no harm will come to them and that I learn daily to be efficient and careful
  7. by   JBudd
    Can get a lot of assessments done during a bath &/or bed cleaning, often the longest amount of time I can get my hands on the patient. It goes so much faster with 2, and much easier on the patient, and builds good working relationships with your aides. You know who is gentle and competent, and who you don't want anywhere near you :chuckle
  8. by   NRSKarenRN
    beverly malone was a former ana president, active in icn who is now is general secretary (executive director) of royal college of nursing, england

    beverly malone came into post as rcn general secretary at the end of june. before this she was deputy assistant secretary for health in the us department of health and human services, the highest position a nurse has ever held in the us government. her role involved advising on health policy and development issues and in setting legislative priorities. from 1996 to 2000 she was president of the american nurses association. (from rcn website: www.rcn.org)
    -----------

    excerpts from the article:

    the changing status of women in society has made some nurses think they are above core activities like washing people's feet or backsides, malone told a news conference at the royal college of nursing's (rcn) annual conference in harrogate....

    the conference will discuss whether nurses should focus on treatment and technical nursing, leaving their caring role to less qualified health care assistants - a suggestion expected to be roundly defeated.
    jeremy bore, a general nurse from exeter in southern england, said he called for the debate because a significant minority of new nurses don't want to provide basic holistic care.

    ----------
    "changing status of women in society has made some nurses think they are above core activities like washing people's feet or backsides"

    gee, i remember hearing that from some bsn students in 1979 " i can delegate that task". heard it recently on the bb too in form of "why pay me to cleanup someone, when you can have an aide to that for less money, and let me perform other critical skills" so the attitude is nothing new to me.

    yes somtimes prioritizing patient care needs means that the act of bathing/cleaning gets delegated as life maintaining skills: suctioning, stabilizing blood sugars, iv drip titration and medication administration, wound care is performed.

    but those persons who routinely shy away from hands on patient care are missing a golden opportunity for assessment, patient interaction and teaching opportunities that can unearth important clues in how to help a person why meds were not taken as prescribed, unknown fears, incorrect preconceived disease concerns that once unearthed can lead to frank discussion and
    improved client/patient health status.

    sounds like the rcn wants to reinforce that the caring role is an essential part of nursing and should not be abandoned .
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on May 13, '04
  9. by   scoobie
    being a nursing student, i get categorized as an up-and-comer who's "too posh" to wash. i was warned about the rep of being too good and handing the job over to the CNAs but to tell you the truth i think it's the easiest way to assess and built rapport. sometimes things come up (labs, xray) or the pt just simply doesn't want a bath and as a student i get a rep of being too good to wash when in fact i'm respecting the pt wishes. in one of my clinical experiences, i had a pt who hadn't had a bath or oral care in 4 days! the pt almost died of glee at the idea of being able to feel "clean". i think RNs and all healthcare workers in general should agree that as the healthcare profession evolves we are going to see more delegation of duties, especially washing, because inturn we are gaining more responsibilities. yes washing is an important part of gaining a complete PE but if something "more important" comes up you better believe that the washing isn't going to get done, especially with all the legality of nursing nowdays. duties that cannot be delegated are going to be prioritized first and washing last, if at all.
  10. by   redheadindixie
    I don't know any nurses like those in the article. Young or older.
  11. by   mattsmom81
    I've worked around quite a few new BSN grads who were shocked they actually were expected to clean poop on occasion. Shocked because their school deluded them as to what their TRUE role would be: many graduate believing they will immediately be in a supervisory position only. They wanted to be 'the boss' but found out quickly that real life nursing was not all about being a boss. Many in this group did not stay nurses long. I suspect it is still happening, particularly at the schools that have limited clinicals..
  12. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from mattsmom81
    I've worked around quite a few new BSN grads who were shocked they actually were expected to clean poop on occasion. Shocked because their school deluded them as to what their TRUE role would be: many graduate believing they will immediately be in a supervisory position only. They wanted to be 'the boss' but found out quickly that real life nursing was not all about being a boss. Many in this group did not stay nurses long. I suspect it is still happening, particularly at the schools that have limited clinicals..
    that's why in my previous post i wrote that those who wouldn't do it, don't have a clue as to what being a nurse means and should get out. some things in nursing just can't be taught.

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