New BSN Program in NYC - LIU Teams Up With Kings County Hospital

  1. 1
    Whoo-Hoo!

    For those thinking about entering the nursing profession, Long Island University has teamed with King's County Hospital (a NYC owned HHC hospital), to offer a new BSN program.


    BROOKLYN – To help ease Brooklyn’s significant nursing shortage, Long Island University’s Brooklyn Campus is partnering with New York City’s Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) to offer a bachelor of science degree in nursing at Kings County Hospital Center.

    A ribbon-cutting ceremony Friday at 2 p.m. inside Kings County Hospital Center will commemorate the new program, which is sponsored by the NYC Center for Economic Opportunity (CEO) and provides scholarships for economically disadvantaged participants. CEO was established by Mayor Bloomberg to develop innovative ways to reduce poverty in New York City.

    Long Island University President Dr. David J. Steinberg, Brooklyn Campus Provost Gale Stevens Haynes, Kings County Hospital Senior Vice President Antonio Martin and HHC President Alan D. Aviles are expected to speak at the event. Kings County Hospital Center is located at 451 Clarkson Ave in Brooklyn. The ribbon cutting will take place on the fifth floor of the “T” Building.

    The country’s nursing shortage — the result of a large number of older nurses retiring and the overwhelming health care needs of an aging population — is expected to worsen over the coming years. The federal government says nursing is among the few recession-proof careers in the current economy, with more than one million new and replacement nurses needed in the United States by 2016. Nowhere in the nation is the shortage felt more than in Brooklyn.

    “Brooklyn has the largest shortage of nurses — particularly nurses from diverse cultures,” said Dawn Kilts, dean of the Brooklyn Campus School of Nursing. “The Long Island University Brooklyn Campus/Kings County program provides an opportunity for more nurses from diverse populations to be educated. It benefits Brooklyn citizens and health care in general.”
    Full Article:
    http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categor...id=31&id=35104
    Last edit by brian on Apr 30, '10
    Faeriewand likes this.
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  3. 38 Comments so far...

  4. 4
    This is almost cruel. The New York metro area is super saturated with nurses who can't find jobs and the solution is to create yet another nursing program?

    The last thing new grads need is more competition.
  5. 0
    I agree! I just read an article on this site stating that a hospital in NYC was cutting 100 jobs.

    And I thought the climate in Maryland was bad! What are new grads to do?
  6. 3
    "To help ease Brooklyn’s significant nursing shortage"

    Wow, just wow....What nursing shortage are they talking about?

    There is no nursing shortage, I am personally a highly experienced nurse who cannot find a job to save my life. And in case anyone thinks it's just me, I assure you it is not. There are many nurses out there in the same boat. When experienced nurses and new grads cannot find jobs that should tell you something. And the last time I checked NYC HHC has a hiring freeze and is getting ready to lay off thousands of healthcare workers. This just ticks me off...
    Last edit by justami on Apr 30, '10 : Reason: typing
    PinkRNBSN, JeanettePNP, and sunrock like this.
  7. 2
    Ok girls, clam down! *LOL*

    If one reads the article carefully, and Googles around the Interent, there is more to this program than meets the eye.

    Notice how many times "diverse" and such are used in the piece? This program was annouced/started back in 2007, as part of a NYC effort to help poor and working poor, and minorities, "better" themselves via education. Hence the New York City/HHC/CUNY connection.

    To me the whole hybrid program seems odd as students do their pre-nursing at any CUNY school, then take nursing classes at a new "school" set up at Kings County Hospital, but area the upper division BSN non-nursing (core, electives, related etc), taken (LIU?), and who is awarding the BSN degree? Will it be a CUNY degree? LIU? Kings County Hospital?

    http://www.nyc.gov/html/ceo/html/programs/nurse.shtml
    PinkRNBSN and Faeriewand like this.
  8. 0
    It is LIU awarding the degree. The catch is that once you graduate you are basically contracted to work in a HHC hospital for 4 years.
  9. 0
    So one would assume that graduating from this program guarantees a job after graduation? Have there been any situations where a new grad has signed a contract but can't get hired- therefore being on the hook for thousands of dollars owed?
  10. 2
    I know people in the pre-clinical phase of the program. What happens is that you are given a choice in where ans what area of practice you want to work in. HHC will try their best to fulfill that but if thee is no opening you will be placed in another area of need at one of the HHC facilities. Basically you will be placed. The program in basically a feeder for HHC.

    I was thinking about applying due to the fact that I am poor. I can get into LIU on my own but the monetary help would be nice. However, I do not like the idea of a contract.
    dreamon and Faeriewand like this.
  11. 1
    Quote from dreamon
    So one would assume that graduating from this program guarantees a job after graduation? Have there been any situations where a new grad has signed a contract but can't get hired- therefore being on the hook for thousands of dollars owed?
    First class does not graduate from this program until 2011, IIRC.

    So basically what HHC has done is a new twist on the hospital based diploma program.

    Do know despite the many here in the group who state they have looked into working at HHC hospitals, NYC's public hospitals seem to have a problem with attracting and retaining nurses. Bellevue at one point was considering offering nurses some sort of housing, at least that is what one nurse there told me .

    By and large HHC hospitals aren't for every nurse, so maybe this is their way of at least getting some sort of stable supply. However it will be interesting to see how many graduates of this program remain in the system beyond their contractual agreements. Also am interested in seeing the board passing rates and if the program will seek accreditation.
    Faeriewand likes this.
  12. 0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    First class does not graduate from this program until 2011, IIRC.

    So basically what HHC has done is a new twist on the hospital based diploma program.

    Do know despite the many here in the group who state they have looked into working at HHC hospitals, NYC's public hospitals seem to have a problem with attracting and retaining nurses. Bellevue at one point was considering offering nurses some sort of housing, at least that is what one nurse there told me .

    By and large HHC hospitals aren't for every nurse, so maybe this is their way of at least getting some sort of stable supply. However it will be interesting to see how many graduates of this program remain in the system beyond their contractual agreements. Also am interested in seeing the board passing rates and if the program will seek accreditation.
    The student is accepted into LIU-Brooklyn. You take classes with other regular LIU students. You graduate with LIU degree and LIU had the highest first time NCLEX pass rate of all the 4yr BSN programs in NY last year( according to the NYS nursing board site). So there is no need for accreditation. All the program does is pay for your tuition costs.


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