More Hospitals Banning Elective C-Sections

  1. 1
    http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/mor...184500620.html

    Saw this article today and I think it is a great idea, wanted to see what everybody else thought.


    But hospitals across the country are intent on reversing that birth-on-demand trend. The top hospitals in Massachusetts are now refusing to offer elective C-sections and inductions before 39 weeks gestation, and many medical centers in New York, Arizona, Oregon, New York, California, Texas, and Illinois have banned them as well.

    "We became good at delivering babies before 39 weeks. Doctors were thinking if you can deliver at 39 weeks, why not 38 weeks or 36 weeks," said Dr. Ken Welch of the Banner Estrella Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona, which stopped scheduling elective C-sections and inductions in July. "We just had to draw that line in the sand and say, because of the data, that we've become convinced we know it's healthier for the baby and we know the mother wants what's best for the baby."
    lindarn likes this.
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  3. 62 Comments so far...

  4. 33
    They're not banning them altogether, which would be nice too, just the ones before 39 weeks. I'm almost certain it's to do with the March of Dimes initiative, which is not brand new. When I was pregnant with DD (now almost 6mo old) my OB handed me a MoD pamphlet that basically said - unless there is a true medical need, we are not going to deliver you by any fashion before 39 weeks, so don't bother asking. I am glad to see this, because your average lay person doesn't realize the tremendous amount of fetal brain growth/development that occurs between 35 and 39 weeks.

    I had a patient a few months ago who was set to be induced at 34 weeks (PPROM on long term bedrest) who was genuinely shocked that her baby would end up in NICU for more than a couple days.

    This quote at the end was what galled me the most:
    "You're already out of control of your body, so at least to know if you go to your doctor's office and say, 'Look, we're at 37 weeks, and I feel like I'm ready,' " Lisa Coulouris, who had twins via emergency C-section earlier this year, told NPR. "To know that I would have that choice would just make me feel better. But to take it away from me just adds to the pressure of being pregnant.
    "I feel like I'm ready?" You might feel like you're ready, but your babies likely aren't, or they'd be letting you know. Taking the choice of induction/section away from you would add to the pressure of being pregnant? Come on. I know those last few weeks are uncomfortable, but that's part of the bargain. You don't get to have your baby delivered just because you feel like you are ready. Or, you shouldn't anyway.

    Sorry for the soapbox rant. I am just of the opinion, having seen it too many times, that if you push Mother Nature enough, she will eventually push back, and hard.
    VICEDRN, Alikatz, pseudomonas, and 30 others like this.
  5. 20
    You want to stop c sections just claim that children born through c section are more likely to become autistic and people will avoid them just like vaccines.

    I do think its a good thing what these hospitals are doing there is a reason why it takes time for a baby to be born and doing it early because it fits better into your schedule or whatever other selfish reason you have wont do the baby and good.
    pseudomonas, IowaKaren, crazysin, and 17 others like this.
  6. 15
    Anyone who has listened to the lungs of a baby born via c-section versus a baby born vaginally would know that VAGINAL is the best way - for baby and for mom. There are reasons for women to have c-sections, but convenience should not be one of them. (FYI: I went into preterm labor at 35 weeks gestation and I CRIED when they told me they were going to stop the labor - I was THAT uncomfortable! That was before I was a nurse, but when my midwife explained that my baby's lungs might not be fully developed and she could have problems, I quickly wiped my tears away and "sucked it up".)
    Alikatz, SilentfadesRPA, IowaKaren, and 12 others like this.
  7. 7
    I think the thing I like most about this initiative is that it's all from the perspective of safety. Think about how much $$ they could make from the NICU who takes these late pre-term kids in for a few days to a few weeks.
    ShifraPuah, RNLaborNurse4U, lindarn, and 4 others like this.
  8. 10
    I have had 3 C-sections. The first was an emergency at 39 weeks(after being on bedrest for preterm labor @ 24 weeks) the next was at 37 weeks and my son was born at 36 weeks on the day. None of these were scheduled, I had to have a clear labor pattern for the last 2. I even tried a VBAC with the second child and that didn't work out. I had to present in labor before we could do the C-section. And this was 17 years ago, I guess I just don't understand the reasoning, I mean there shouldn't be a surgery unless there is a true reason for it. Since when are babies a convienence?
    Alikatz, ShifraPuah, RNLaborNurse4U, and 7 others like this.
  9. 9
    Quote from Elvish
    They're not banning them altogether, which would be nice too
    I don't think anyone should be induced/c-section before the 39 to 40 week point but the whole 'c-sections are evil' movement annoys me a bit too. When I was 38 weeks with my oldest my doc sent me for a level 2 ultrasound because I was measuring large and my pelvis is very narrow and was not widening at all to prepare for the birth. When he got the results he was concerned about how large his head was and the problems I might face laboring. He diagnosed me with cephalopelvic disproportion. He told me my delivery had some risks (like my son getting stuck in the birth canal and various other possibilities) we needed to be aware of. I asked him straight out what my chances of needing an emergency c-section with a condition like this and he notified me that it was a very good possibility. I asked him if I could bypass the possible trauma to my son and have a c-section and he said, 'other than vbac, this is one of those conditions I'll do elective c-sections for).. We scheduled for a day (after my due date) and that was that. I don't regret it. I wasn't looking for convenience, I was thinking 100% about the safety of my son. I had my second son c-section too, at 40 weeks.. no vbac..

    My mom almost died giving birth to my older brother- before the days of C-sections, the nurse was literally sitting on top of her chest pushing down to help get him out-- he was too big for her.. it tore her up, literally.

    Those who think c-sections need to be stopped altogether apparently have never almost died or worried about the well being of their child having a so-called 'natural' birth.
    DebblesRN, Quark09, ShifraPuah, and 6 others like this.
  10. 2
    I had 2 c-sections, the first was after many hours of labor with a breech presentation. He just wasn't coming down!! I was quite tired, and we were concerned because I had bad asthma at the time. The second was planned - only one week earlier than my due date. The doc said my cervix wasn't ripe yet and maybe I should wait a few days. I asked him to go ahead with it, and he did. My kid was 8 lbs - and was completely okay.

    But more than a week, or for someone's convenience is probably not a good thing.
    lindarn and moonchild86 like this.
  11. 9
    Quote from mjmoon
    I don't think anyone should be induced/c-section before the 39 to 40 week point but the whole 'c-sections are evil' movement annoys me a bit too. When I was 38 weeks with my oldest my doc sent me for a level 2 ultrasound because I was measuring large and my pelvis is very narrow and was not widening at all to prepare for the birth. When he got the results he was concerned about how large his head was and the problems I might face laboring. He diagnosed me with cephalopelvic disproportion. He told me my delivery had some risks (like my son getting stuck in the birth canal and various other possibilities) we needed to be aware of. I asked him straight out what my chances of needing an emergency c-section with a condition like this and he notified me that it was a very good possibility. I asked him if I could bypass the possible trauma to my son and have a c-section and he said, 'other than vbac, this is one of those conditions I'll do elective c-sections for).. We scheduled for a day (after my due date) and that was that. I don't regret it. I wasn't looking for convenience, I was thinking 100% about the safety of my son. I had my second son c-section too, at 40 weeks.. no vbac..

    My mom almost died giving birth to my older brother- before the days of C-sections, the nurse was literally sitting on top of her chest pushing down to help get him out-- he was too big for her.. it tore her up, literally.

    Those who think c-sections need to be stopped altogether apparently have never almost died or worried about the well being of their child having a so-called 'natural' birth.
    No one said they should be stopped altogether, just that ELECTIVE C-sections should be banned.
    Alikatz, ShifraPuah, VivaLasViejas, and 6 others like this.
  12. 0
    Quote from CrazierThanYou
    No one said they should be stopped altogether, just that ELECTIVE C-sections should be banned.
    How would you define elective? My doctor said that my case was one of the time he agreed to do 'elective' c-sections.


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