Midwife struck off for yanking woman by umbilical cord - page 2

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  1. by   welnet66
    Something doesn't sound right here people. Come on OB nurses, can you really pull the weight of a woman down the bed with an umbilical cord? Why was she completely alone with a delivering patient? Was anyone there to tend to the baby? Did she have another laboring patient who needed attention? There has got to be more to this story....
  2. by   RN1121
    Here's a one word answer: WHAT???????
  3. by   rnmomtobe2010
    So sad and heartless!!!!
  4. by   Pattiecake
    Quote from brefni
    Something doesn't sound right here people. Come on OB nurses, can you really pull the weight of a woman down the bed with an umbilical cord? Why was she completely alone with a delivering patient? Was anyone there to tend to the baby? Did she have another laboring patient who needed attention? There has got to be more to this story....
    I'm with you. I can't imagine the cord wouldn't just tear apart with the weight of a woman being dragged around by it. I don't think it is even possible to drag someone down the bed with it.
  5. by   Becca608
    :smackingf Good Grief! I wonder what training is required for midwifery in Britain? I just finished my first and pulling on the cord creates complications that can lead to hemorrhage. What was this woman thinking?

    :smiley_ab
  6. by   KellNY
    Quote from JediWitch
    :smackingf Good Grief! I wonder what training is required for midwifery in Britain?
    I'm not sure what that was supposed to mean. This obviously isn't the norm there, or she wouldn't have been "struck off". Some of us Americans do stupid crap too.
  7. by   RGN1
    Quote from brefni
    Something doesn't sound right here people. Come on OB nurses, can you really pull the weight of a woman down the bed with an umbilical cord? Why was she completely alone with a delivering patient? Was anyone there to tend to the baby? Did she have another laboring patient who needed attention? There has got to be more to this story....
    In the UK a woman who is labouring normally and is not a high risk patient for any reason is always only attended by a registered midwife. All 3 of my children were delivered safe, sound & well by trained midwives. They are great. I didn't want to see a doctor trying to "medicalize" my delivery at any point. The doctor is only called if things start to go wrong & the midwife feels that assisted delivery such as c-section/forceps etc is required. The midwife attends to the baby once delivered as well. Usually s/he calls for assistance as the delivery becomes imminent. The assistant can be a student midwife or even a medical student though & will take orders from the midwife in charge of that delivery.


    As for pulling too hard that the mother is yanked down the bed I think that would be possible in the fact that the pain would make her move down the bed pretty sharpish.

    As has already been said when you are "struck off" it means that you can no longer practice your profession in the UK & it should also mean that you can't practice anywhere else either but it's up to other countries to check out with the NMC the names of those who have been struck off. You can be struck off in any profession that keeps a register - doctor, lawyer, nurse etc. It literally means your name is crossed off the list of those eligible to practice.
  8. by   cheshirecat
    Having trained as a nurse and midwife in the UK, I can assure you I was never trained to pull a cord and yank a women down the bed!!

    The fact the midwife in this case has been struck off shows the severity of what occurred in the delivery room. It also shows the NMC is doing its job properly ie protecting the public.
  9. by   RGN1
    Quote from JediWitch
    :smackingf Good Grief! I wonder what training is required for midwifery in Britain? I just finished my first and pulling on the cord creates complications that can lead to hemorrhage. What was this woman thinking?

    :smiley_ab

    In the UK the training is degree or diploma -three years. There used to be an 18 month course for those who had already completed their general nurse training but that doesn't exist anymore.

    As the other person who replied to this quote said - US nurses do stupid cr** too - just because someone passes their training doesn't always mean they practice as well as they should. Unfortunately there are always going to be people who do stupid things despite all the training in the world, that's just life - it shouldn't happen but it does. At least she can't do it anymore, the system for ridding our profession of those who are unsafe has at least worked in this case.

    Out of interest have you ever looked at your own BON's list of cases of malpractice? I looked when I got my Vermont license out of curiosity - there were some not so pretty stories there too!

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