Midwife delivers baby, takes husband. - page 2

What was this midwife thinking? Get thee back to ethics class! :down:... Read More

  1. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from Turd Ferguson
    Going off on a tangent... not trying to instigate anything, I'm just curious- I didn't think that midwives were licensed or regulated, and they are only really qualified to take care of stable low-risk cases? Correct me if I'm wrong!

    PS- They're both to blame. The midwife crossed numerous professional and ethical boundaries, and the guy just sounds like your run of the mill dirtbag.
    The thing is this is in the UK and midwives deal with everything in regards delivery unless the mother requires surgery to deliver the baby. Doctors don't really step in unless the mother is deemed at risk with delivery and go under the watch of the consultant but most births are only dealt with by the midwife.

    The NMC does have something about ethics but not sure if they can bring anything up as this happened 5 months post delivery and no telling how long this went on before he left his wife
  2. by   zenman
    Reminds me of the pregnant woman who visit a CNM in Mississipppi. She CNM asked the lady the father's name, then went home and shot her own husband. You got to be dumb to send your pregnant girlfriend to see your wife.

    Also I was told at a detention center I worked at that if any staff EVER at any point in their lives ever hooked up with an inmate or ex inmate, that it was a felony. No worries about ethics, you just get in big trouble!
  3. by   Trenia
    Quote from rn/writer
    Ethical standards are a necessary requirement of holding a license.



    Walking out the door does not instantly end the professional relationship.

    In many fields, professionals are encouraged to steer clear of connecting with clients/patients on Facebook or other social sites. This runs so much deeper. If there aren't clear-cut lines between one's professional life and one's private life, messy little things like conflict of interest and breach of trust can and do occur.

    If you can't see it, you can't see it. But I think most of us can.
    You said it was a commonly suggested standard. That's why I'm confused. What does it actually say?
  4. by   gonnago4it
    People can be horrible at times! I feel so sorry for the wife.
  5. by   rn/writer
    Here is a well-written explanation of the ethical standards for nursing. Even though it did not originate in the US, it expresses in a clear and concise manner the nature of the boundaries we should observe, the conflicts that can arise when personal and professional boundaries appear to collide or overlap, and the reasons behind the guidelines that they suggest.

    https://www.crnbc.ca/Standards/Lists...ationships.pdf

    You probably will not find a specific time limit mentioned in nurse practice acts throughout the country. In part, this may be because situations are so individual that a one-size-fits-all approach just isn't wise. Where there is no element of betrayal or other conflict of interest, perhaps circumstances would be different.

    In this situation, though, I believe this person acted selfishly and with little regard for her patient.
  6. by   Silverdragon102
    the code of conduct for the nmc states



    boundaries

    boundaries define the limits of behaviour which allow a nurse or midwife to have a professional relationship with a person in their care. the relationship between a nurse or midwife and the person in their care is a professional relationship based on trust, respect and the appropriate use of power. the focus of the relationship is based on meeting the health needs of the person in their care. a nurse or a midwife crosses a professional boundary when they behave in any way that oversteps their professional role with a person in their care, their family member or any one else involved with the person's care to create a personal relationship.

    and

    what about people formerly in the care of a nurse or midwife?

    a relationship with a person formerly in the care of a nurse or midwife, or their carer, will often be inappropriate for the same reasons that a relationship is inappropriate with a person currently in the care of a nurse or midwife. the relationship may be influenced by the previous professional relationship, which will often have involved an imbalance of power. nurses or midwives who think that such a relationship may develop, must consider the possible future harm this may cause and the impact on their professional status. they must consider the following:

    * when the professional relationship ended and how long this relationship lasted
    * whether the professional relationship consisted of a significant power imbalance
    * whether the former person in their care, was or still is particularly vulnerable
    * whether they are exploiting a power imbalance or the knowledge or influence that they gained through the professional relationship to develop or progress the relationship
    * whether they are treating, or are likely to treat any other members of the person's family

    in the event of a complaint it will be for the nurse or midwife to show that he or she has not abused or exploited any professional relationship. they will also need to show that all the issues above have been considered and that they have sought appropriate advice.

    much more is written

    http://www.nmc-uk.org/nurses-and-mid...al-boundaries/

    http://www.nmc-uk.org/nurses-and-mid...-code-in-full/
  7. by   rn/writer
    Thank you, Silverdragon, for posting information that has a direct bearing on this case.

    We may have become a casual, anything goes society in many ways, but this isn't one of them. Nor should it be.
  8. by   imintrouble
    People who do not have a grasp on morality, will simply not be able to understand why the midwife's behavior violated a code of ethics.
    The good thing is that morality can be taught and learned.

    The midwife violated the trust placed in her by the family she assisted. It was ethically and morally wrong.

    The above is not in any way meant to offend, and I apologize in advance for any hard feelings it may cause.
  9. by   Trenia
    Quote from imintrouble
    People who do not have a grasp on morality, will simply not be able to understand why the midwife's behavior violated a code of ethics.
    The good thing is that morality can be taught and learned.

    The midwife violated the trust placed in her by the family she assisted. It was ethically and morally wrong.

    The above is not in any way meant to offend, and I apologize in advance for any hard feelings it may cause.
    No reason to and try passive aggressively insult me. I don't see what is wrong with questioning morality. Thanks Silverdragon102, your post helps some. I am not trying to argue that is morally okay for the midwife to do what she did. I was just looking for a concrete violation. I'm aware that things have to be handled on an individual case, but I was looking for information like Silverdragon102 was able to provide.
  10. by   imintrouble
    To Trenia:
    I meant no insult. You are the same age as my daughter, and we simply don't think alike. We don't have the same values. We don't think the same things are important or worthwhile. We come from different times and have been molded by different events. I was taught about ethics and morals from my parents. My daughter didn't learn about those things from me, even though I tried to teach her what I felt was valuable. She learned from her friends and TV. It's the phenomenon I witness here time and time again. The younger posters simply don't view the area of ethics the same as those who are older. That observation is not absolute, but it does occur more times than not.

    Words on a screen are a less than optimal way to communicate. That's why I now place a disclaimer on my posts when I truly mean no harm. I did not mean an insult.
  11. by   chicookie
    at first i agreed with trenia but after reading rn/writer and silverdragon102 posts i have to say i changed my mind.
    your professional relationship with a patient and her family doesn't end once your job is done. plus then i read the part where the midwife looked up the husband on facebook and that to me is a huge no-no. you just don't do that.
    i especially liked this quote by silverdragon102:
    "in the event of a complaint it will be for the nurse or midwife to show that he or she has not abused or exploited any professional relationship. "
    which this midwife clearly did.

    the wife is better off i think. once a cheater, always a cheater. my two cents.
  12. by   caregiver1977
    Okay I just have to say this.

    That husband was a grown human being. Unless the midwife drugged him, locked him in her car trunk, and kept him tied up against his will then he was not "taken." I just hate when that is said. It makes it seem like it is all the midwife's fault. Unless he is pretty mentally unstable he cannot be taken. He left because he wanted.

    If my husband ever becomes "takeable" then whoever wants him can have him. And believe me, he feels the same way if I become "takeable."
  13. by   babyNP.
    This is an interesting issue. Obviously both parties are dirt bags (midwife+husband) in this situation...but:

    Would the situation change if it was 5 years from now? (the article stated 8 months or so). 20 years? Is there an acceptable time length? What about if the couple got divorced first with no infidelity?

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