Midlevel Health Jobs Shrink

  1. 0
    The health-care sector, one of the last redoubts of stable and well-paying jobs for less-educated workers, is beginning to look less secure.

    A variety of factors, from technological advances to increased attention on both costs and patient outcomes, are driving hospitals and other health-care providers to demand more from both the most- and least-skilled workers, while gradually eroding opportunities for those in the middle.
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...856966992.html
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 2,238 Views
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 5 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Unfortunately, subscription to WSJ is required to read the article. I initially assumed the headline referred to "midlevel" providers -- NPs and PAs -- but after seeing the subhead I suspect that it is referring more generically to various administrative & technical employees.
  6. 0
    Quote from Altra
    Unfortunately, subscription to WSJ is required to read the article. I initially assumed the headline referred to "midlevel" providers -- NPs and PAs -- but after seeing the subhead I suspect that it is referring more generically to various administrative & technical employees.
    Works for me: Some Hospital Jobs Shrivel - WSJ.com
  7. 0
    Quote from Altra
    Unfortunately, subscription to WSJ is required to read the article. I initially assumed the headline referred to "midlevel" providers -- NPs and PAs -- but after seeing the subhead I suspect that it is referring more generically to various administrative & technical employees.
    Actually a bulk of the article was given over to the dire situation for LPNs and LVNs who are finding it hard to find work in hospitals and elsewhere. One person interviewed for the article finishes her LPN school and got her license only to find it very hard to find work. The work she is getting doesn't pay very well.

    As for the rest of the article this quote pretty much sums things up:

    The erosion of midlevel jobs goes beyond nursing. Experts say several forces are at work.

    Automation has eliminated many transcription and clerical jobs. Cost pressures have led hospitals and other health-care providers to push many routine tasks onto medical assistants and other lower-paid workers.

    Pharmacies, for example, increasingly employ a mix of licensed pharmacists—who now often need a doctorate—and technicians who fill prescriptions with only limited training.

    The shift to electronic medical records, meanwhile, has eliminated many traditional jobs maintaining patient records but has created a wealth of new opportunities for those with coding skills.

    At the same time, the increasing complexity of medicine, along with an increased focus on measuring and improving patient care, has raised the bar on educational requirements for some jobs. An Institute of Medicine committee in 2010, for example, recommended that 80% of registered nurses have bachelor's degrees by 2020, meaning nurses with associate's degrees may soon find themselves in the position LPNs face today.

  8. 0
    I clicked on the updated link, and still get a page telling me that subscription/log in is required.

    I agree that the employment shift is a result of evolving technology and workplace norms - and not limited to health care.
  9. 0
    Ok, now the above link is dead for me as well. Sorry about that.

    Mentioned awhile ago in another post that both the WSJ and NYT keep their articles mostly behind paywalls now. The odd few (and that now is nil for the NYT) articles that do appear for "free" are only up for about 24 to 48 hours before they require a subscription to view.

    Wait a minute! Just tried to find the article online and up it came.

    Simply Google "Midlevel Health Jobs Shrink" or the author "Ben Casselman) and you should be able to see find it, just remember what one said above, the thing may not be up for free forever.

    WSJ must turn off link backs after a certain period.


Top