Medicare cuts spread pain at Nursing Homes

  1. 0
    http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/pr...preads-at.html

    Nursing home closures, staff layoffs, price increases and cost-cutting on everything from food to contracted care will likely result from an 11 percent Medicare cut that took effect for skilled nursing Oct. 1. The cuts were first announced July 29, leaving little preparation time for skilled-nursing facilities to figure out how to absorb the revenue cuts with minimal impact on their operations.

    Nursing homes statewide provide about 99,000 jobs, and the skilled-nursing sector is Texasí second-largest health sector after hospitals, according to the Washington, D.C.-based Alliance for Quality Nursing Home Care . There are more than 24,000 skilled-nursing facility beds in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, according to the Texas Health Care Association.

    The Medicare cuts will reduce funding for Texas skilled-nursing facilities by $349 million in 2012, according to the alliance. The cuts will prove ďtraumaticĒ for the industry, said Mike Gavin, president of Plano-based Preferred Care Partners Management Group, which owns seven skilled-nursing facilities in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and 64 others in 10 states.

    Preferred Care Partners isnít laying people off immediately, but itís leaving vacant positions unfilled, and Gavin didnít rule out layoffs in the future. Labor and employment benefits make up about 60 percent of the companyís expenses, he said. ďWhen you have this level of reduction, itís almost impossible to survive without making changes in either your hiring practices or reducing your workforce or benefits just to be able to come out whole,Ē Gavin said.

    The goal for any staffing level changes will be to make them without affecting patient care, but thatís proving difficult, Gavin said.
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    Those places already lay such a heavy load on seasoned and NG nurses. I just don't know what will be left as far as patient care and employee treatment.
    TheCommuter and Not_A_Hat_Person like this.
  5. 3
    Anytime there are cuts to Medicare and Medicaid, nursing practice and patient care are adversely affected. The main reason healthcare facilities are not hiring nurses, laying off nurses, or increasing patient-nurse ratios are these disastrous cuts. Unfortunately, the PPACA just spreads these cuts and the misery further.
    Lovely_RN, TheCommuter, and leslie :-D like this.
  6. 5
    Maybe families will stop keeping their loved ones alive trached and pegged visiting once a year when the cost is then having to be supplied by them.
    Perhaps the average person will start to look at quality of life and see that many of these poor people who were suffering anyone starting at a wall day after day will be let go. It's ok to let your 89 year old Grampa go with dignity.
    nursejoed, leslie :-D, montecarlo64, and 2 others like this.
  7. 1
    Quote from NickiLaughs
    Maybe families will stop keeping their loved ones alive trached and pegged visiting once a year when the cost is then having to be supplied by them.
    Perhaps the average person will start to look at quality of life and see that many of these poor people who were suffering anyone starting at a wall day after day will be let go. It's ok to let your 89 year old Grampa go with dignity.
    I work in LTC, and the vast majority of our residents have families that are very involved. Most would like nothing better than to keep their family member at home but for whatever reason cannot. Some of these residents are private pay, at a very high cost. Cost of care aside, who are you, or I, or anybody else to decide what that person's quality of life is? No resident is left "staring at a wall day after day" and I am insulted that you would think that. I hope for your sake you are never in the position of needing to make the decision to place a loved one in a facility for extended care, but if God forbid it does happen do you really think you would have that attitude if it was your own "89 year old Grampa" needing care???
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  8. 5
    I don't know.. I've seen long term trach peg patients wit dementia and its usualy pretty sad. Seems that we forgot somehow that dying is a natural process. You sound like u work at a great facility.. but from an icu nurse perspective a lot of times I ask myself.. why.
  9. 4
    Quote from kbrn2002
    I work in LTC, and the vast majority of our residents have families that are very involved. Most would like nothing better than to keep their family member at home but for whatever reason cannot. Some of these residents are private pay, at a very high cost. Cost of care aside, who are you, or I, or anybody else to decide what that person's quality of life is? No resident is left "staring at a wall day after day" and I am insulted that you would think that. I hope for your sake you are never in the position of needing to make the decision to place a loved one in a facility for extended care, but if God forbid it does happen do you really think you would have that attitude if it was your own "89 year old Grampa" needing care???
    as already stated, it sounds like you work in a great facility AND the residents are very lucky to have involved family members.
    i can assure you however, that is not always the case...it's not even the norm.
    i've seen many tragic cases, where the residents aren't "living", but merely existing...and alone.

    i wish all facilities were like the one you work in.
    finally, our elderly would get the love and attention they truly deserve.

    leslie
    VickyRN, maelstrom143, TheCommuter, and 1 other like this.


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