Man's Suicide shown on TV - page 5

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  1. Visit  Atheos profile page
    0
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    Fear of death is instinctual. Animals, also, seem to have this fear.
    So is the desire to pee in the corner, kill any man the even TALKS to OUR women. So is the need to kill or subjugate other people because they are different. So is the need to shun disabled people.

    Instinct is no excuse. We have the power to overcome instinct. We HAVE overcome instinct.

    However, not ALL societies fear it. Not all lock it away. This is not an instictual thing. It is a cultural thing.

    I've met people from other cultures that embrace death. They don't fear it.
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  3. Visit  FireStarterRN profile page
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    Go ahead Stanley, overcome your instincts and good luck with it! Let us know how it goes.
  4. Visit  Atheos profile page
    2
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    Go ahead Stanley, overcome your instincts and good luck with it! Let us know how it goes.
    While I'll not comment on the 'sarcastic' meaning 'behind' your post, I'll comment on your outward meaning.

    Been bipolar 2 all my life, along with that comes depression. I've been depressed most of my life and suicidally depressed at least half. My daughter also died making those previous things worse.

    You REALLY think I fear death. Some mornings I wake up longing for it.

    So be flippant if you wish. People HAVE overcome their instincts.

    I guess those elderly people that come to terms with their deaths or even the subject of the this thread are exceptions?

    One day you may find that there are things in life scarier and WORSE than death. I hope that day never comes...
    robydoby and RN1982 like this.
  5. Visit  leslie :-D profile page
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    Quote from stanley-rn2b
    i guess those elderly people that come to terms with their deaths or even the subject of the this thread are exceptions?

    i truly believe most elderly people are ready to die.
    there's something about living a long life, that knocks the begeebeez out of you.
    they're tired, come their time.
    and yes, most are ready.


    one day you may find that there are things in life scarier and worse than death. i hope that day never comes...
    even at 50, i have much less fear of death than 20 yrs ago.
    whether it's age related or spiritual (or both), not sure is relevant.
    but i do know the more i 'see', the less i fear.

    however, my biggest fear in life, is having regrets on my deathbed.
    the dying process itself, i'm fine with.
    but i do not want to have regrets....none.

    and yes stan, i also agree there is much worse than death.

    leslie
  6. Visit  pielęgniarka profile page
    0
    I think this would be a good time for me to mention the book Dying Well, by Ira Byock (an advocate for end of life care). I'm in tears after watching that video.... what this man did was have respect for his quality of life. the option was there for him to humanely go out while he still had his mind to do so, and he took it. I watched my mother suffer (at a young age, both of us) while she died from cancer. She was on methadone, roxanol, lyrica, ativan, lidoderm patches and many other meds and was still in writhing agony. I stayed with her trying to soothe her and hold her down the night she died, it made me decide that I would want never want to suffer like that in the wake of a terminal illness. Unfortunately we never know what our final moments are going to be like but evidenced based research can give us an idea. We were doing all we could with hospice to manage the pain but it still wasn't enough. I just couldn't believe that her body wouldn't just shut down from the pain but she kept on going.
  7. Visit  L&DWannabe profile page
    1
    Quote from sfrek1214
    i think this would be a good time for me to mention the book dying well, by ira byock (an advocate for end of life care). i'm in tears after watching that video.... what this man did was have respect for his quality of life. the option was there for him to humanely go out while he still had his mind to do so, and he took it. i watched my mother suffer (at a young age, both of us) while she died from cancer. she was on methadone, roxanol, lyrica, ativan, lidoderm patches and many other meds and was still in writhing agony. i stayed with her trying to soothe her and hold her down the night she died, it made me decide that i would want never want to suffer like that in the wake of a terminal illness. unfortunately we never know what our final moments are going to be like but evidenced based research can give us an idea. we were doing all we could with hospice to manage the pain but it still wasn't enough. i just couldn't believe that her body wouldn't just shut down from the pain but she kept on going.
    i'm so sorry you had to lose your mom that way. :heartbeat
    pielęgniarka likes this.
  8. Visit  robydoby profile page
    0
    I agree that fear of death is a cultural thing. In some cultures people do still die at home. I worked with Hospice for a while and see that there are families in America who are embracing the peaceful death of there loved ones at home, or even in a facility. However, there are not near enough in my opinion. Death is still a taboo subject with many. I do feel that some of this comes from us, the health care professionals. I know alot of doctors who will not discuss death with their patients. I feel we need to be more honest, more open with our patients. Education always comes first, and I feel that we should start discussing these things sooner than we do. I dont mean talk about it on a routine doctors visit- but their are times when we could talk about death and we don't.
  9. Visit  Jo Dirt profile page
    0
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    If turning off a ventilator is assisted suicide, I'm guilty, both as a nurse and having made that painful decision for a close family member.
    I don't necessarily think turning off a ventilator is assisted suicide, considering if it wasn't for the ventilator they wouldn't be alive...that probably doesn't make any sense, but I don't know any other way to put it.
  10. Visit  Jo Dirt profile page
    0
    Quote from Stanley-RN2B
    While I'll not comment on the 'sarcastic' meaning 'behind' your post, I'll comment on your outward meaning.

    Been bipolar 2 all my life, along with that comes depression. I've been depressed most of my life and suicidally depressed at least half. My daughter also died making those previous things worse.

    You REALLY think I fear death. Some mornings I wake up longing for it.

    So be flippant if you wish. People HAVE overcome their instincts.

    I guess those elderly people that come to terms with their deaths or even the subject of the this thread are exceptions?

    One day you may find that there are things in life scarier and WORSE than death. I hope that day never comes...
    Stanley, I know what it's like to go to bed and dread waking up. I've suffered depression most of my life. A lot of it is due to outside influences but it runs in my family, too. It's hard for people who have not had to deal with it on the kind of scale you're talking about to understand, but I might have an idea of where you're coming from. Mental illness is more painful than dealing with a physical ailment, and sometimes you just want the pain to stop.

    I find this post touching because I feel like I can identify with so much of what you're saying.


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