Man brings 3 guns into ER - page 3

by nerdtonurse? | 8,286 Views | 36 Comments

Cops found the first 2....then found the 3rd 2 hours later. Now, what I want to know is...how many of us who work in hospitals IMMEDIATELY thought of specific people when they watched this video? I found my self thinking,... Read More


  1. 0
    What a suprise, a person carrying a weapon into the ED. I have worked in rural ED's where people pack pistols & knifes all the time and are not found until they are undressed. To them it is like just putting on their socks & underware in the morning.

    Have to agree, ED's need to be locked down so people can not get in as they please. This does 2 things- 1st keeps people out who we do not want back in the ED. 2nd keeps family members from going back and forth from the patients room & waiting room.
  2. 0
    Only god will help us.
    Ejilink
  3. 0
    Maybe a stupid question but why doesn't some of the staff carry concealed??
  4. 0
    I started working at Ben Taub Hospital in Houston in '81 or '82 and worked there off and on for years in the ED. We had a number of shootings in the ED while I was there. We finally got metal detectors at all the entrances and it was a big help to keep down the violence in the ED. We got a new CEO and he felt that it was bad for our image to have them so they got rid of them. Well, do you think it would be bad for our image if a patient got shot? or a staff member? ED's are open, dangerous places and you never know what is walking through the doors and what mood they are going to be in when they arrive. I think back on some of the stuff we pulled off people when we were undressing them and I can only say that I am glad that I never met that person on a dark street or in an alley somewhere. I had one guy standing at the end of the triage desk one night threatening to shoot me. He stick his hand inside his jacket to pull out his pistol but fortunately he had left it in his car. The cops took him away. I was not scared, I was mad. Man, that place really made me over cautious. I don't trust anyone.
  5. 0
    Quote from ghillbert
    Where's the surprise? Would be smarter to quit letting Tom, Dick and Harry carry guns instead of locking down the ERs...
    Well its obviouse that he had bad intentions. But not letting "Tom, Dick and Harry" carry guns has nothing to do with this situation. EVERYONE has the right to carry a gun according to the 2nd amendment. Just because some people do bad things with them does not mean that everyone should give them up. Cops shoot people wrongfully, military shoot people wrongfully should we take guns away form them, No, of course not. Yes, it is very scary when guns end up in the wrong hands. However, they are also a source of protection.
  6. 1
    I listened to the video clip. The patient didn't hurt anyone. There were others on the floor with guns (the police). Still bullets flew and this one patient died. Is the answer really to add more guns to the mix?

    Should it become a nurse's job to also act as security? And if you're one of those who is bringing a gun in, are you liable if a patient grabs it while you're working on him? What if he shoots someone with your gun? Or what if you're forced to shoot at him if he threatens you?

    Metal detectors aren't the answer. You'd need to put them at every entrance and man them. This is especially true in city hospitals where budgets are so tight there aren't enough nurses or doctors -- so can we afford to mandate security guards at every entrance? Wouldn't we save more lives overall by relieving the shortage of medical staff?

    And if you mandate metal detectors & security checks, what of urgent cases? Or do you let someone who appears to be having a heart attack wait outside until a busy security guard can get around to running the wand over him and carefully removes every key, bottlecap, cellphone, and coin from his body?

    What about the first responders? Shouldn't the ambulance be allowed to wait with doors locked until police first show up and run a wand over everyone present? If not, when the patient comes in via ambulance, at what point do you force him to get off the board so you can run the wand over his whole body? Is the medic's job to also search him en route to hospital?

    The bigger picture is that a nurse's job is not 100% risk free. And if you look at the stats, I think you'll find you're far more likely on the job to be assaulted, sexually harassed, suffer a workplace injury, be exposed to an infectious disease or harmful chemical, or have your career damaged by false accusations by the occasional crazy. I try to focus on what is likely to happen.
    Brikkz likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from tewdles
    I was always thankful that we had a contract with the local federal prison and ALWAYS had armed guards in the ER, halls, cafeteria, smoking areas, etc. I saw that as a deterant for the local crazy who might think about acting some crap out in the absence of scary people with guns. I was always curious as to why hospital security had no guns, I mean we are talking about high stress environments where people die and their strung out "significant other" blows his cork. I have been threatened, spit at, bitten, hit, and otherwise abused, and I worked in the peds ICU and L & D, glad I didn't work in the ER!
    Just wondering if you could share some of the reasons for all those negative actions and threats you have had. It sounds perfectly awful!
  8. 0
    Quote from diane227
    I started working at Ben Taub Hospital in Houston in '81 or '82 and worked there off and on for years in the ED. We had a number of shootings in the ED while I was there. We finally got metal detectors at all the entrances and it was a big help to keep down the violence in the ED. We got a new CEO and he felt that it was bad for our image to have them so they got rid of them. Well, do you think it would be bad for our image if a patient got shot? or a staff member? ED's are open, dangerous places and you never know what is walking through the doors and what mood they are going to be in when they arrive. I think back on some of the stuff we pulled off people when we were undressing them and I can only say that I am glad that I never met that person on a dark street or in an alley somewhere. I had one guy standing at the end of the triage desk one night threatening to shoot me. He stick his hand inside his jacket to pull out his pistol but fortunately he had left it in his car. The cops took him away. I was not scared, I was mad. Man, that place really made me over cautious. I don't trust anyone.
    Maybe they should walk in cold to the CEO's office instead of into the ER.

    Glad you were ok, Diane.
  9. 0
    This video sounds like very sloppy police work. We will never know what really happened, just as we will never know what transpired between Prof. Gates and Sgt. Crowley to cause Crowley to decide to arrest Gates. The most important information is always missing.
  10. 0
    Quote from Vito Andolini
    This video sounds like very sloppy police work. We will never know what really happened, just as we will never know what transpired between Prof. Gates and Sgt. Crowley to cause Crowley to decide to arrest Gates. The most important information is always missing.

    Ehat does Prof. Gates and Sgt. Crowley have to do with anything in this post?


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