LPNs Fight Efforts To Phase Them Out - page 8

by DoGoodThenGo | 24,296 Views | 139 Comments

Licensed Practical Nurses at one hospital are fighting efforts to have them phased out of direct patient care. The hospital intends to go with a different care model calling for expanded use of RNs and UAP staff to replace the... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from Ginger's Mom
    Many LPN programs can't get placements in hospitals for clinical, they graduate without working in a hospital. LPN are not taught the nursing assessment as extensively as RN. LPN can not learn the theory in half the time of a RN.

    LPN are not taught delegation like a RN program. Pharmcology is scaled down.

    Does this diminish the an individual experiences a LPN may have, no but the system we have in based on nursing education not experience. I know my assessment skills are superior to a new MD, but does this make me a MD since I can assess, diagnosis, and provide the proper orders for a patient, of course. Not.

    If LPN via experience can work at the RN level, smart RN should be able to practice on the MD level.
    When I went through all of our clinicals were at acute care hospitals. We never went to an LTC, but that was in 1975 and I'm sure things have changed. I've always been the sort of person who wanted to learn above and beyond the classroom, and there certainly isn't anything that would prevent a person from being committed to lifetime learning as a matter of habit no matter what their current degree is. So maybe I'm assuming too much about other people.
  2. 0
    This is so sad and it is happening in the michigan hospital I am working at right now. The LPN's that are in school have to be RN's by the end of may or they are turned into nursing assistants or fired. NICE huh?! But this particular hospital gave ALL the LPNS a chance to go back to school a couple of years ago and the hospital payed for it. Lets just say the lpns on my unit are not happy.
  3. 0
    KDBSN, I am in an LPN program right now and I lay awake part of the night trying to decide if I am going to go on to RN. I want to, but I am so darn tired and broke. I am signed up for more pre-reqs this summer and am about to cancel because I am having a hard time coming up with the extra money to fund it. Im also about ready to settle for LPN because school takes away so much from my family. I dont have enough time for my kids, and I am exhausted from the stress of the last few years of school. How do other people overcome these obstacles to a higher education?
  4. 1
    I think people are missing the whole point, it doesn't matter what education the LPN gets, is what the State Board dictates on what the LPN can do. Here in AZ, the state board changed the scope of practice for a LPN which caused al the acute care hospitals to stop hiring LPNs. LPN can no longer note physician orders. They can do them in SNF but not at acute care hospitals.

    The whole debate about having no more LPNs is finally coming true, but only in Acute Care hospitals. I know that each region is different and there might be some hospitals still using them, but are they hiring new ones? Again, here in Phoenix, none of the acute care hospitals are hiring LPNs and at the hospital I work at, the LPNs that are working the floors have until Jan 2012 to be in a RN programs or they will lose their jobs. The hospital is fazing out the LPN role. The LPNs were told in 2010 about this so they have had plenty of time to get in a program.

    Now as someone who was a LPN for 6 years in a Acute Care Hospital, I can debate both side of this topic, but I truly do not believe that hospitals use the LPN in the correct role. I have for a while at where I work to get them to us the LPN as a Discharge/transfer nurse. Don't take the RN off the floor to transfer someone or D/C the patient.


    Quote from nursel56
    When I went through all of our clinicals were at acute care hospitals. We never went to an LTC, but that was in 1975 and I'm sure things have changed. I've always been the sort of person who wanted to learn above and beyond the classroom, and there certainly isn't anything that would prevent a person from being committed to lifetime learning as a matter of habit no matter what their current degree is. So maybe I'm assuming too much about other people.
    Mrs. SnowStormRN likes this.
  5. 1
    Anne its a tough road in nursing school. In the LPN to BSN program I had a couple of classmates who were in your shoes (well all of us where tired) but the added stress of family compounds the issue. But the question remains, will your family be better off once you are done with school? If the answer is yes, then keep going. Don't stop at the LPN, move on the RN. Once you are done, you will see you made the right choice and your family will better off. Right now it look hopeless, but when you are done and you look back you will be happier. I wanted to quite my LPN to BSN program many times, I was up till 1-2am finishing papers, or doing research for a presentation. I am SO happy I finished, my income jumped from 42K/yr to 75K/yr (base not including overtime) and I can go to ANY state and get a job.

    Quote from Anne36
    KDBSN, I am in an LPN program right now and I lay awake part of the night trying to decide if I am going to go on to RN. I want to, but I am so darn tired and broke. I am signed up for more pre-reqs this summer and am about to cancel because I am having a hard time coming up with the extra money to fund it. Im also about ready to settle for LPN because school takes away so much from my family. I dont have enough time for my kids, and I am exhausted from the stress of the last few years of school. How do other people overcome these obstacles to a higher education?
    NurseLoveJoy88 likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from tferdaise
    I think people are missing the whole point, it doesn't matter what education the LPN gets, is what the State Board dictates on what the LPN can do. Here in AZ, the state board changed the scope of practice for a LPN which caused al the acute care hospitals to stop hiring LPNs. LPN can no longer note physician orders. They can do them in SNF but not at acute care hospitals.

    The whole debate about having no more LPNs is finally coming true, but only in Acute Care hospitals. I know that each region is different and there might be some hospitals still using them, but are they hiring new ones? Again, here in Phoenix, none of the acute care hospitals are hiring LPNs and at the hospital I work at, the LPNs that are working the floors have until Jan 2012 to be in a RN programs or they will lose their jobs. The hospital is fazing out the LPN role. The LPNs were told in 2010 about this so they have had plenty of time to get in a program.

    Now as someone who was a LPN for 6 years in a Acute Care Hospital, I can debate both side of this topic, but I truly do not believe that hospitals use the LPN in the correct role. I have for a while at where I work to get them to us the LPN as a Discharge/transfer nurse. Don't take the RN off the floor to transfer someone or D/C the patient.
    I don't disagree with this, but I think it's only part of the point. From what I've seen, LPN programs tend to teach to the level of the LPN scope of practice. That's where the training part comes in.
  7. 1
    This makes no sense, of course they teach the LPN scope of practice, why would they teach the RN scope of practice? It would like saying, the RN schools should teach to the NP level...

    My suggestion would be for people to sit in to their states nursing board meetings, they are open to the public since they are a state agency. Its really an eye opener to see how they come about first hand. Had to do this for my BSN program and was amazed at what I learned..

    Quote from GM2RN
    I don't disagree with this, but I think it's only part of the point. From what I've seen, LPN programs tend to teach to the level of the LPN scope of practice. That's where the training part comes in.
    Mrs. SnowStormRN likes this.
  8. 0
    I have worked at many hospitals over the years and NONE of them hire LPNS. Nowadays, even being an RN is not enough.In my area most hospitals will only hire BSN. But LPN's are still utilized a lot in the LTC and home care settings.
  9. 0
    Quote from tferdaise
    This makes no sense, of course they teach the LPN scope of practice, why would they teach the RN scope of practice? It would like saying, the RN schools should teach to the NP level...

    My suggestion would be for people to sit in to their states nursing board meetings, they are open to the public since they are a state agency. Its really an eye opener to see how they come about first hand. Had to do this for my BSN program and was amazed at what I learned..
    It makes absolute sense based on what you said yourself, in this post, that LPNs are not taught the same as RNs. This was in response to your previous comment that "it doesn't matter what education the LPN gets."
  10. 0
    My comment about "it doesn't matter what education the LPN gets" was in reference to their clinical rotation, whether they are done in the Acute Care setting or SNF.


    Quote from GM2RN
    It makes absolute sense based on what you said yourself, in this post, that LPNs are not taught the same as RNs. This was in response to your previous comment that "it doesn't matter what education the LPN gets."


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