Lowering Nursing Salaries - page 9

Have any of you got news of them lowering salaries due to the shortage? There had been talk of the new hires salaries being lowered.... Read More

  1. by   koan
    Quote from hipab4hands
    If you live in the major metro areas, in California-San Francisco, LA, San Diego- you are getting top wages, especially if you are unionized.
    I live in the Sacramento area, and wages for non union nurses are horrible. It is cheaper to live in the Sac area than in the Bay Area, but not by much.
    The non unionized hospitals and employers are not giving out raises. I have had 2 job interviews, which wanted to start me out at salary of $25 an hour. ( I was making this amount over 8 years ago,when I lived in the Bay Area and I have almost 15 years experience as an RN)
    Unfortunately, It looks like I'll be moving out of state, because I can no longer afford housing around here.
    Interesting because I live in Sacramento and I am tryign to get into nursing school here and the recent grads from Sac City Community College are *starting* at 30$'s an hour, so how is it you can only get offered 25 with your experience?
  2. by   simbawicz
    Quote from MTBanRN
    Have any of you got news of them lowering salaries due to the shortage? There had been talk of the new hires salaries being lowered.
    Actually, yes. The case managers on our floor were treated to a $2.00 per hour pay cut since they do not provide direct patient care. Like this was a newly discovered fact. Also, in our hospital, we get cost of living increases each year based on "current market-driven wages" and there is no such thing as a merit increase. Talk about inviting mediocrity!
  3. by   mm4785
    Quote from DeeSki
    You make quite a point, unfortunately around here it just doesn't work out like that. Two years ago I decided to finally fulfill my dream to become a nurse and start college (at 39 yrs old with no credits). When I realized how long it was going to take me to finish my prereqs and get into the ADN program at my community college way out on Long Island (NY), I decided to complete a Liberal Arts degree so that all my credits would transfer and I'd apply to Stonybrook University so that I could get a BSN instead. I even took an extra Honors Science lab class so that I would have all the BSN prereqs done. I completed the seventy something credits in the two years, with a 3.889 average, graduating summa cum laude. Guess what? I applied to the BSN program and didn't even get an interview! I have just completed my first semester in teh ADN program. I will end up with two Associate degrees including all my BS core classes for NY state. It still doesn't add up to a BSN! There are only very few BSN programs out here and I can't afford the time or expense to travel further than Stonybrook so I will finish this degree and hopefully complete my BSN at some future point. It will now be more difficult because I believe I will need to complete a certain amount of credits at the University in order for them to give me a degree. Having so many credits upon admission will not work out in my favor and will cost me more time and money in the long run. SO, since I have taken several English courses, two western civ courses, one american history course, art history, group dynamics, communications and Spanish along with my nursing courses...should I comman more respect than other ADNs? I WISH I were currently working for my BSN but its not to be.

    Dee
    You are right about the situation in downstate New York. But did you know that Stonybrook had an accelerated ASN program - I'm not sure if they still do but it might be of interest to you. When I was in the ASN program, after the 1st semester one of our classmates left and entered that program, and I worked with one of the graduates and she was an excellent nurse. Stonybrook also has an online BSN. And there are CUNY colleges that have RN to BSN programs. I'm not sure how far you live from the city but it might be worth your while to check out the colleges in the five boroughs.
    I'm in my forties also, and I'm working on my BSN, and yes I was only allowed to transfer a certain number of credits, and not all of my credits were accepted even though I had many prerequisites from my college work before I became a nurse.
    It's not easy to go this route to get the BSN, but it is just what some of us have to do. Good luck with your nursing career.
  4. by   nursemelani
    Quote from koan
    Interesting because I live in Sacramento and I am tryign to get into nursing school here and the recent grads from Sac City Community College are *starting* at 30$'s an hour, so how is it you can only get offered 25 with your experience?
    Yes- she scared me with that 25 dollars per hour figure. I have also heard that new grads start at $30/hr. A friend of mine who also lives here in the Sac area works for a temp agency and makes almost $50 per hour.
    I am making 17 per hour as a home health LVN, so I need to make at least $10 more an hour to make it worth my while to get my RN.
  5. by   hipab4hands
    Quote from koan
    Interesting because I live in Sacramento and I am tryign to get into nursing school here and the recent grads from Sac City Community College are *starting* at 30$'s an hour, so how is it you can only get offered 25 with your experience?
    If you can work in the hospital, then you can get these type of wages. These are still low compared to the San Francisco area. The only one that pays more is Kaiser and they are unionized.

    For those of us, who no longer are able to physically work in the hospital, and need to work in out patient clinics or similiar settings, $25 an hour is pretty much the going rate at places like Sutter, UC Davis, etc.,

    I've applied to several area private medical companies and stated what my salary needs were. ( I asked for at least what new grads are making) They all had the same answer-they don't pay those "high" wages. I also noticed that those companies had almost all older nurses in their 60's working there. I didn't see anyone my own age.
    Last edit by hipab4hands on Jan 6, '06
  6. by   nursemelani
    Quote from hipab4hands
    If you can work in the hospital, then you can get these type of wages. These are still low compared to the San Francisco area. The only one that pays more is Kaiser and they are unionized.

    For those of us, who no longer are able to physically work in the hospital, and need to work in out patient clinics or similiar settings, $25 an hour is pretty much the going rate at places like Sutter, UC Davis, etc.,

    I've applied to several area private medical companies and stated what my salary needs were. ( I asked for at least what new grads are making) They all had the same answer-they don't pay those "high" wages. I also noticed that those companies had almost all older nurses in their 60's working there. I didn't see anyone my own age.
    Wow. That is not good. Have you thought about home health visits? I think they pay about $35 dollars per visit, plus mileage.
  7. by   grace90
    Quote from mtbanrn
    have any of you got news of them lowering salaries due to the shortage? there had been talk of the new hires salaries being lowered.
    sounds like the human resources and accounting departments of these hospitals are run by monkeys. if my salary got lowered and my work load got raised, i'd give nursing the salute and say "adios". seriously, i love nursing, but i couldn't see doing it anymore under those kind of conditions. seems like a strategical error to lower salaries due to a shortage. would these people who make salary and staffing decisions for their hospitals want their loved one laying in a hospital bed sick, on a nurse's team of 7-10 or more patients on an understaffed unit? does anyone else besides nurses think of those things? sorry... just venting.
  8. by   grace90
    Quote from Mel23
    However, I can't understand why anyone would want to work as a floor nurse.
    Alright, now you got my attention. 2 minutes ago I was disgruntled with nursing. However, when I read this statement and that whole reply accompanying it, it made by sit up straight and put my shoulders back and put on my white cap (well, okay, I don't have a white cap).

    Ever considered a different profession?

    Why do I work as a floor nurse?
    1st off, someone has to.
    Someone has to get their hands dirty and be elbow deep in the puke. Someone has to hold the confused and frightened old lady's hand when she's laying in the hospital attached to buck's traction in pain and not knowing where she is or where her mother is.
    Someone has to be there when the 21 year old is threatening to miscarry her first baby.
    Someone has to be there in the middle of the night when sleep won't come and fear of the unknown has overwhelmed the 33 year old mother of 5 diagnosed with colon cancer.
    Someone has to be there for the 48 year old diabetic who's heart and kidneys are failing, when he can barely breathe because his lungs are full of fluid, and the Dr. just took off the top of his foot, and he only speaks a handful of English.
    Someone has to be there for the 50 year old special ed teacher with 3 teenage children who was hit by a drunk driver and broke both arms.

    Why am I a floor nurse?
    Because I've seen the comforting power of a warm blanket, and gentle touch and a warm cup of tea to a dying elderly woman.
    Because I've held a terminally ill woman's hand as she died, and comforted her daughter.
    Because I've done a dance at a patient's bedside when they passed gas for the first time in 2 weeks, and done an even bigger dance when I came in the next night and saw his name on the list of discharged patients.
    Because we nurses see our fellow man when they are down, when they're sick, when they're life isn't going as planned. We see the ugly side of life. We know we can't fix it, but we can do our durndest to make it better.
    That's why some of us want to do floor nursing.
  9. by   land64shark
    Quote from grace90
    Why do I work as a floor nurse?
    1st off, someone has to.
    Someone has to get their hands dirty and be elbow deep in the puke. Someone has to hold the confused and frightened old lady's hand when she's laying in the hospital attached to buck's traction in pain and not knowing where she is or where her mother is.
    Someone has to be there when the 21 year old is threatening to miscarry her first baby.
    Someone has to be there in the middle of the night when sleep won't come and fear of the unknown has overwhelmed the 33 year old mother of 5 diagnosed with colon cancer.
    Someone has to be there for the 48 year old diabetic who's heart and kidneys are failing, when he can barely breathe because his lungs are full of fluid, and the Dr. just took off the top of his foot, and he only speaks a handful of English.
    Someone has to be there for the 50 year old special ed teacher with 3 teenage children who was hit by a drunk driver and broke both arms.

    Why am I a floor nurse?
    Because I've seen the comforting power of a warm blanket, and gentle touch and a warm cup of tea to a dying elderly woman.
    Because I've held a terminally ill woman's hand as she died, and comforted her daughter.
    Because I've done a dance at a patient's bedside when they passed gas for the first time in 2 weeks, and done an even bigger dance when I came in the next night and saw his name on the list of discharged patients.
    Because we nurses see our fellow man when they are down, when they're sick, when they're life isn't going as planned. We see the ugly side of life. We know we can't fix it, but we can do our durndest to make it better.
    That's why some of us want to do floor nursing.

    Very Nice!
  10. by   SunshineBaby
    Quote from grace90
    Alright, now you got my attention. 2 minutes ago I was disgruntled with nursing. However, when I read this statement and that whole reply accompanying it, it made by sit up straight and put my shoulders back and put on my white cap (well, okay, I don't have a white cap).

    Ever considered a different profession?

    Why do I work as a floor nurse?
    1st off, someone has to.
    Someone has to get their hands dirty and be elbow deep in the puke. Someone has to hold the confused and frightened old lady's hand when she's laying in the hospital attached to buck's traction in pain and not knowing where she is or where her mother is.
    Someone has to be there when the 21 year old is threatening to miscarry her first baby.
    Someone has to be there in the middle of the night when sleep won't come and fear of the unknown has overwhelmed the 33 year old mother of 5 diagnosed with colon cancer.
    Someone has to be there for the 48 year old diabetic who's heart and kidneys are failing, when he can barely breathe because his lungs are full of fluid, and the Dr. just took off the top of his foot, and he only speaks a handful of English.
    Someone has to be there for the 50 year old special ed teacher with 3 teenage children who was hit by a drunk driver and broke both arms.

    Why am I a floor nurse?
    Because I've seen the comforting power of a warm blanket, and gentle touch and a warm cup of tea to a dying elderly woman.
    Because I've held a terminally ill woman's hand as she died, and comforted her daughter.
    Because I've done a dance at a patient's bedside when they passed gas for the first time in 2 weeks, and done an even bigger dance when I came in the next night and saw his name on the list of discharged patients.
    Because we nurses see our fellow man when they are down, when they're sick, when they're life isn't going as planned. We see the ugly side of life. We know we can't fix it, but we can do our durndest to make it better.
    That's why some of us want to do floor nursing.
    I meant you no offense by my statement. Everyone is suited to different things. Floor nursing is not for me. I have certain goals that I want to meet in life and working in a hospital forever will not allow me to pursue them. While your statement was nice, I do not feel like less of a person for doing what makes me happy.
  11. by   Jack39
    Linda, Thanks for your honest comments. I am a 40 year old attending an ABC community college in Florida and heed your comments. I worked in construction for 20 years and the same issues apply to that profession. I plan to aquire a BSN after I start working again. I know people like me are part of your angst, but any advice would be appreciated.
  12. by   DeeSki
    Quote from Mel23
    On a side note though, the nicest nurse I ever had at clinicals was an LPN. She was so eager to show me everything. I'll never forget that
    Its funny you should mention that. I just finished my first semester of clinical and I have to say that the only hospital/staff members who were even remotely helpful or interested in helping/training me or even in patient care were the CNAs! I hope that I can find an RN on my next rotation or two that might be slightly happy to see a student

    Dee
  13. by   DeeSki
    Quote from mm4785
    You are right about the situation in downstate New York. But did you know that Stonybrook had an accelerated ASN program - I'm not sure if they still do but it might be of interest to you. When I was in the ASN program, after the 1st semester one of our classmates left and entered that program, and I worked with one of the graduates and she was an excellent nurse. Stonybrook also has an online BSN. And there are CUNY colleges that have RN to BSN programs. I'm not sure how far you live from the city but it might be worth your while to check out the colleges in the five boroughs.
    I'm in my forties also, and I'm working on my BSN, and yes I was only allowed to transfer a certain number of credits, and not all of my credits were accepted even though I had many prerequisites from my college work before I became a nurse.
    It's not easy to go this route to get the BSN, but it is just what some of us have to do. Good luck with your nursing career.
    Hey thanks for your input. I know that Stonybrook has a program that I can possibly get into after I achieve the ASN from SCCC. Most of the 4 yr schools here have the ASN to BSN program but no program for someone who isn't already a nurse. Once I graduate from SCCC I'll be able to apply to several different schools that are fairly local to get my BSN or take it online. I definitely plan to continue on. The CUNY schools are way to far. We live out in the boonies (or at least that's what we called this place when I lived in the city! lol).

    Dee

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