Lowering Nursing Salaries - page 7

Have any of you got news of them lowering salaries due to the shortage? There had been talk of the new hires salaries being lowered.... Read More

  1. by   ohiorn_78
    I haven't seen in decrease in pay around my area, but there is a standstill in hiring new grads for some odd reason.
  2. by   Sheri257
    Quote from iowanurse199
    One of them is that most Iowa hospitals are already at the California levels, what they fail to say is that most hospital in Iowa count all direct care givers in their ratios, not just RNs, some even count unit clerks.
    That is so lame.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 30, '05
  3. by   kgkarma
    Quote from male lpn
    this is my first visit to this site and i must say i am very dissatisfied at what i have been reading. it is very offensive to me to be referred to as just an lpn. i mean we are all in the profession as one;however, the posts from the individuals who carry the title of bsn have forgotten from where it was they came and is very sad. i have the responsibility as a charge nurse/med. nurse with an lpn license and very proud to say it. i work in ltc with 36 residents who depend on me daily and have never at one point in time ask my title. i pray we can look outside our egos and unite with one voice as to achieve more for our profession. may god richly bless you all.
    This is also my first time to the board and couldn't believe the arrogance of the said poster. I was laid off of my job after many years and decided to do what I've always wanted to do, and that was to become a nurse. I'm single, have a mortage, and am no "spring chicken", etc. etc. Like someone else posted, it will take me 4 or more years to get my ADN because I had to take all of the prereqs. plus get on the waiting list. Hopefully, I'll be able to get into the LPN program next fall and then bridge into the RN after I wait the mandatory year. If not, it'll take me another year. Oh, btw, I'm also working 25 hours a week.

    The community college I'm attending has 100% NCLEX pass rate which should tell you it's no joke here. To get in the program you have to have just about all A's unless you've worked in the Allied Health field which gives you extra points.

    I was one of those high school dropouts that had done extremely well in corporate America until the bomb hit and I got laid off. I had to first get my GED before I could even get into school. My first semester, I was inducted into the Phi Theta Kappa honor society with a 3.8 GPA. With only 4 prereq's left to take, I am carrying a 3.73 GPA. How dare anyone imply that I'm taking the easy way out.

    In closing, it is my understanding that we all take the same test to become a nurses so "why the hate". When I was hospitalized, I didn't care whether my nurse was an LPN, ADN, or BSN as long as they were there for me and performed their duties.

    I was so excited to find this website, how discouraging this first experience has been.
  4. by   DusktilDawn
    Quote from kgkarma
    This is also my first time to the board and couldn't believe the arrogance of the said poster. I was laid off of my job after many years and decided to do what I've always wanted to do, and that was to become a nurse. I'm single, have a mortage, and am no "spring chicken", etc. etc. Like someone else posted, it will take me 4 or more years to get my ADN because I had to take all of the prereqs. plus get on the waiting list. Hopefully, I'll be able to get into the LPN program next fall and then bridge into the RN after I wait the mandatory year. If not, it'll take me another year. Oh, btw, I'm also working 25 hours a week.

    The community college I'm attending has 100% NCLEX pass rate which should tell you it's no joke here. To get in the program you have to have just about all A's unless you've worked in the Allied Health field which gives you extra points.

    I was one of those high school dropouts that had done extremely well in corporate America until the bomb hit and I got laid off. I had to first get my GED before I could even get into school. My first semester, I was inducted into the Phi Theta Kappa honor society with a 3.8 GPA. With only 4 prereq's left to take, I am carrying a 3.73 GPA. How dare anyone imply that I'm taking the easy way out.

    In closing, it is my understanding that we all take the same test to become a nurses so "why the hate". When I was hospitalized, I didn't care whether my nurse was an LPN, ADN, or BSN as long as they were there for me and performed their duties.

    I was so excited to find this website, how discouraging this first experience has been.
    Kgkarma and Male lpn,
    You will see a variety of different opinions on a certain subject, please don't base your opinions on just one thread. With over 100,000 members there is certainly bound to be subjects we will disagree about with others and there is also bound to be opinions expressed by some that strike a bad chord with others. Personally I think the "Battle of the Alphabet" accomplishes nothing and in fact diminishes what nurses stand for.

    Best wishes to you both and I hope you continue here.
  5. by   kgkarma
    Quote from DusktilDawn
    Kgkarma and Male lpn,
    You will see a variety of different opinions on a certain subject, please don't base your opinions on just one thread. With over 100,000 members there is certainly bound to be subjects we will disagree about with others and there is also bound to be opinions expressed by some that strike a bad chord with others. Personally I think the "Battle of the Alphabet" accomplishes nothing and in fact diminishes what nurses stand for.

    Best wishes to you both and I hope you continue here.
    Thank you for the encouragement.
  6. by   SFCardiacRN
    Kgkarma & Male lpn, you will see a lot of venting on this site. Don't be discouraged. Some posters ARE elitist and some post controversy just to watch the sparks fly! This forum is interesting, funny, informative and sometimes maddening. Enjoy!
  7. by   Rnurse4963
    EEEEEK!! pay me less to do more are they nuts?I'm dissapointed that the new graduates are making way more than they should and that the older nurses are just making a few bucks more, but on a lighter note usually when one hospital in this area gives the nurses a raise the rest have to follow so they don't loose more nurses than they can live with out. Geesh .
  8. by   nubins397
    Quote from male lpn
    this is my first visit to this site and i must say i am very dissatisfied at what i have been reading. it is very offensive to me to be referred to as just an lpn. i mean we are all in the profession as one;however, the posts from the individuals who carry the title of bsn have forgotten from where it was they came and is very sad. i have the responsibility as a charge nurse/med. nurse with an lpn license and very proud to say it. i work in ltc with 36 residents who depend on me daily and have never at one point in time ask my title. i pray we can look outside our egos and unite with one voice as to achieve more for our profession. may god richly bless you all.
    well said! Iam a LPN and very proud!Iworked very hard to get where Iam. Hey,and Ihave made good $$ too,.
    Last edit by nubins397 on Jan 2, '06
  9. by   kgkarma
    I'm dissapointed that the new graduates are making way more than they should and that the older nurses are just making a few bucks more,
    Not sure if the new grads are making more than they should but I understand your frustration. The same situation happens in corporate
    America. New employees always come in making a little less than people that have been on the jobs for years. I guess one of the reasons the newbee salaries grow at a faster rate than regular raises do is because of the cost of living and competion. I was always told that you get your money coming in the door. The advantage of nursing is, if you're experienced, you can always leave and go to another job where they'll appreciate your experience and give you the money up front. A friend of mind whose a very good nurse has changed hospitals twice and received substantial bonuses in doing so. At some point, we newbees will become experienced nurses and be complaining about the same thing. :wink2:
  10. by   Sheri257
    Quote from kgkarma
    Not sure if the new grads are making more than they should but I understand your frustration. The same situation happens in corporate America. New employees always come in making a little less than people that have been on the jobs for years. I guess one of the reasons the newbee salaries grow at a faster rate than regular raises do is because of the cost of living and competion. I was always told that you get your money coming in the door. The advantage of nursing is, if you're experienced, you can always leave and go to another job where they'll appreciate your experience and give you the money up front. A friend of mind whose a very good nurse has changed hospitals twice and received substantial bonuses in doing so. At some point, we newbees will become experienced nurses and be complaining about the same thing. :wink2:
    Sorry to keep harping on the union situation here but ... it is another way to remedy the situation besides changing jobs. Union pay is typically based on the amount of work experience you have, so more experienced nurses do make a lot more than new grads. Even if you haven't worked at the facility your entire career, you usually can qualify for the higher pay as long as you provide documentation of your previous work experience.

    In one union contract I'm familiar with 20 year nurses can make nearly $20 more per hour than new grads, and that's the way it should be.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jan 2, '06
  11. by   kgkarma
    Quote from lizz
    Sorry to keep harping on the union situation here but ... it is another way to remedy the situation besides changing jobs. Union pay is typically based on the amount of work experience you have, so more experienced nurses do make more than new grads. Even if you haven't worked at the facility your entire career, you usually can qualify for the higher pay as long as you provide documentation of your previous work experience.

    In one union contract I'm familiar with 20 year nurses make nearly $20 more per hour than new grads, and that's the way it should be.

    :typing
    I agree 100% but I don't ever see conservative N.C. voting for the union. Of course, never is a very long time.
  12. by   DidiRN
    The union hospitals I worked at, although had better pay, always seemed to stick it to the nurses in some other way. For example, one union hospital was the only one in town not only unionized, but also the only hospital that required mandatory overtime (now how that got past the union is beyond me).
    The vast majority of jobs that I had that treated me the best were in non-union hospitals. Perhaps in your area they do a better job, but not in my neck of the woods. I'm not against unions...just have not seen them stand up for their nurses like they should have.

    Quote from lizz
    Sorry to keep harping on the union situation here but ... it is another way to remedy the situation besides changing jobs. Union pay is typically based on the amount of work experience you have, so more experienced nurses do make a lot more than new grads. Even if you haven't worked at the facility your entire career, you usually can qualify for the higher pay as long as you provide documentation of your previous work experience.

    In one union contract I'm familiar with 20 year nurses can make nearly $20 more per hour than new grads, and that's the way it should be.

    :typing
  13. by   Sheri257
    Quote from DidiRN
    The union hospitals I worked at, although had better pay, always seemed to stick it to the nurses in some other way. For example, one union hospital was the only one in town not only unionized, but also the only hospital that required mandatory overtime (now how that got past the union is beyond me).
    The vast majority of jobs that I had that treated me the best were in non-union hospitals. Perhaps in your area they do a better job, but not in my neck of the woods. I'm not against unions...just have not seen them stand up for their nurses like they should have.
    Yeah ... from what I've been reading, it seems like the only good nurses unions are in California (which is my neck of the woods). Other unions don't seem to be very effective.

    Although ... as was pointed out earlier ... a union is only as effective as its membership. If the union doesn't get a lot of support from its members and, vice versa, it probably isn't worth it.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jan 2, '06

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