Letter: Hospital's nurses deserve better

  1. It is outrageous that the Rutland Regional Medical Center intends to change the pension plans of their nurses.

    While in the waiting room for our ration of care at the hospital, much conversation ensues among patients regarding the wonderful work the nurses at the hospital do, and how important it is to us to keep the continuity of care going. If answering honestly, any provider at the hospital would have to state that their own delivery of care to patients would be impossible without the nurses. This continuity could be compromised while the hospital takes from these professionals what they say would be significant savings to the institution. RRMC should not jump on the current bandwagon of raiding pensions of its nurses.

    The hospital continues to waste money on television advertising. No one goes to RRMC because they saw an advertisement on TV, nor will advertising keep them coming.

    While the Bush administration continues to allow unsafe releases of mercury and other carcinogens into the atmosphere, and continues to allow the production of genetically modified seeds, the hospital is not going to run out of patients any time soon, with the opposite being true. Our air will be contaminated, as well as our vegetation and the livestock that feeds from it. RRMC's cancer patient influx will grow to proportions that it may not be ready for. One way to prepare is to make every effort to retain the nurses it has and to hire even more of these dedicated people with fringe benefits they deserve.

    Full Story: http://www.rutlandherald.com/apps/pb...512010315/1037
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   Judee Smudee
    The person writing this letter is expressing a valid concern. The sad thing is that the pension changes will go through anyway. At least that is what happened to everyone else.
  4. by   tlcprn2u
    Are the nurses at Rutland unionized? Through a strong membership participation and contractual language, nurses that are members of the SEIU National Nurse Alliance throughout the country, have been able to prevent hospital administrators from implementing ideas that damage recruitment and retention of qualified staff as well as patient care.
  5. by   grentea
    Definitely some valid concerns, and I'm sure they deserve much better....but what does George Bush have to do with it? Honestly, I'm not a big fan of the prez but I'm not seeing the link between a higher census in Rutland Hospital's oncology floor, higher levels of mercury in the environment, genetically modified seeds, and George Bush. Mercury could be linked to autism and various neurological probems...as far as genetically modified seeds, that's just an idea that nobody likes but we've been eating genetically modified crops for years before it was all over news. Unless there's a crop that triggers a protein in our bodies that causes our cells to start mutating out of control (and that has never happened), they don't cause cancer, and they haven't been proven to be harmful in any way. Just as a side note, genetically modified crops could help developing countries to have more nutriotionally valuable foods. It's not just so our apples can look prettier in the grocery store. Well, anyways, I didn't intend to start any sort of political debate, especially since I don't like Bush, but it makes no sense to blame him for everything from rising cancer rates to dry meatloaf. Anyways, I wish all the best to the nurses up there in Rutland. They certainly should be treated better.
  6. by   Katnip
    Unfortunately, pensions in all industries have been falling by the wayside for quite some time as business worked on cutting expenses. Sad, but not uncommon.

    In the '80s people who were about to retire and those who had retired lost the pensions they'd worked their behinds off for all their lives. They wound up with nothing. So this incident isn't really unique.

    As for Bush's policies and cross-bred crops, I have a lot to say about those, but it's irrelevant to this post.

    ~Kat

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