Lack of nurses? Real problem could be a lack of professors - page 2

A shortage of nursing professors, not poor grades, has kept some interested students from enrolling in nursing programs. More... Lack of nurses? Real problem could be a lack of professors (The... Read More

  1. by   oramar
    Quote from scooterRN52
    The system pushes education, but when you get there you can't use it and they won't pay you what your worth.
    You hit on something there that is not much discussed in nursing though I have seen a few post about it. Perhaps because it is seen as greedy and not nurse worthy to discuss money. Education is touted and promoted by nursing leadership. If you are LPN you should get your RN they say. If you are RN you should have your BSN. If you have your BSN you need a master and then a PhD. They also want you have all kinds of credentials. In very few cases are these advancements in educational status accompanied by increases in pay that would justify all the work required to get them. One exception would be nurse anesthetist. Advanced education SOMETIMES allows you to get into a saner desk job with reasonable hours and schedule. However, from what I have heard about those sort of jobs they do not include much in the way of pay increases. Most administrative postions and teaching positions are salaried which procludes the possiblity of overtime. I have had managers that remarked that their senior staff nurses were making way more than them because they got compensated for over 40 hrs a week where managers got nothing.(perhaps that is why some of them are so hot to come in under budget and get that bonus, you don't even want to hear me go off on that subject) Tell me if I am wrong. If their are a lot of high paying jobs out there that people with advanced education in nursing can just have for the asking let me know. I got a few friends that are over qualified with education and experience to do big things with big pay but they say the jobs are not there.
  2. by   scooterRN52
    Quote from oramar
    You hit on something there that is not much discussed in nursing though I have seen a few post about it. Perhaps because it is seen as greedy and not nurse worthy to discuss money. Education is touted and promoted by nursing leadership. If you are LPN you should get your RN they say. If you are RN you should have your BSN. If you have your BSN you need a master and then a PhD. They also want you have all kinds of credentials. In very few cases are these advancements in educational status accompanied by increases in pay that would justify all the work required to get them. One exception would be nurse anesthetist. Advanced education SOMETIMES allows you to get into a saner desk job with reasonable hours and schedule. However, from what I have heard about those sort of jobs they do not include much in the way of pay increases. Most administrative postions and teaching positions are salaried which procludes the possiblity of overtime. I have had managers that remarked that their senior staff nurses were making way more than them because they got compensated for over 40 hrs a week where managers got nothing.(perhaps that is why some of them are so hot to come in under budget and get that bonus, you don't even want to hear me go off on that subject) Tell me if I am wrong. If their are a lot of high paying jobs out there that people with advanced education in nursing can just have for the asking let me know. I got a few friends that are over qualified with education and experience to do big things with big pay but they say the jobs are not there.
    I am an RN,OCN I also am ACLS certified, I have much experience as a
    clinical nurse, but I was an LPN for 2years before becomming an RN.I am an ADN. so according to nrsg. standards I cannot teach my sister has been a CRNA for 23 years and a critical care nurse prior to that for some time. I think it is sad to get all that education and have a tough time getting on a faculty to teach these much needed nurses.CRNA's are making above 150,000.00 per year. P.A.'s don't even start at that rate.
  3. by   McGraw7
    This is my first posting and I was very glad to see the discussion about the lack of professors. I knew in nursing school that I would want to teach one day. I have spent the last 29 years gaining experience in my field as well as teaching in the community, guest lecturing and mentoring every nursing student who wanted to learn about my speciality. Finally, my opportunity to begin teaching presented itself. I lost 1/2 of my total gross salery, worked harder than I had ever worked, and was treated poorly....I feel as if I know where the term "Nurses Eat Their Young" was born. If it had not been for my amazing students it would have been the biggest disappointment of my career. I want to teach, but I found the academic world removed from reality to a point that even when I tried to stay below the "radar", I drew attention to myself and it was not wanted! I no longer feel sorry for the academics who cry shortage. They do not in my State try to recruit potential teachers, never mind mentoring one. We talk about what we want the future of nursing to be and it is not going to happen with out some fundamental education reform.
    I would take the cut in pay, I will get my Phd anyway, but whether or not I ever teach at a nursing school remains questionable. We as a profession really need to call attention to this issue and bring it out of the closet. Everybody else has been encouraged to change and grow - it is time we ask that of the educators.
  4. by   tferdaise
    I'm a LPN, who wanted to go back to school to get his RN, but the community colleges here would have had me take some of my nursing class over again because I was out of school too long. I would had to have taken the HESI test again to continue with my RN, which makes no sense to me. So I went with Univeristy of PHX for thier LPN to BSN program. WHen I spoke with the program director regarding why it took UoP so long to bring the problem to PHX (they offered it in Tucson) I was told it was tough to get hospitals to give them slots for clinicals...
  5. by   Christine1969
    Hi Everyone:

    I am a VERY new registered nurse (just passed NCLEX yesterday in fact!) and I just wanted to post a students point of view.

    During my first semester of school my class was taught by the instructor that normally teaches the LPNs (at least that's what she kept saying throughout the semester). She had never taught the fundamentals for the RN program before, but there was such a shortage of teachers, her boss practically begged her to take this class (which brought her to a total of six classes for the semester). She only found out about 1 week before the start of the class that she was teaching it, so needless to say, she did a lot of "winging it." For example, it took about 2 tests before we all realized she was using the questions out of the study guide to test us on. Unfortunately, some of the students just started studying the questions alone and not the actual information needed.

    During my second semester, our med/surg instructor (whom they hired 2 days before the start of the class) quit in the middle. We almost didn't get our grades from her and when she did finally turn them over, the majority of them were incorrect.

    During my third semester, approx 3/4 of the instructors found other employment (which was a crying shame since we all felt like we finally had gotten instructors that could teach us something).

    During my last semester (OB/Peds) the instructor for that class informed us that she would be concentrating mostly on OB as that was her "area" and that we would handle Peds as needed. Huh?? I had absolutely no Peds whatsoever, clinical or classroom.

    And finally, through all of this, we went through 3 Program Chairs.

    This is the education that my class (30 students) received.

    Something needs to be done!

    Christine

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