Kansas City nurses, clergy back St. John's strikers on 6th day - page 5

unionized nurses from kansas city and a handful of area clergy members came out in support of striking nurses at st. john's mercy medical center on monday, the sixth day of the strike. two... Read More

  1. by   live4today
    If nurses are going to strike for better conditions where they work, they will need to form their own union of nurses only...run by nurses, for nurses, with the strength of nurses behind it 100%.

    I was very disappointed in how the strike played out in the end all because the "grocery store union's reputation" spoiled what could have been a victory for those nurses. This is a sad occasion for them, but if they really want to make changes where they work, they need to come back fighting with their own All Nurses Union.......leave the nonnursing unions and nonnursing politics out of it!

    I bow with respect to the nurses at St. John's Hospital who dared to make a difference where they work. They did something many nurses around the USA are afraid to attempt because of the potential consequences that face them for standing up for what they believe is right to do on behalf of the patients and themselves. Kudos!!!
  2. by   oncbsnrn
    [quote=cheerfuldoer]
    i was very disappointed in how the strike played out in the end all because the "grocery store union's reputation" spoiled what could have been a victory for those nurses. [quote]
    it wasn't necessarily the reputation of the ufcw as a grocery store union that spoiled the work action. i do think the fact that the ufcw is not experience in st. louis representing rn's did not give them much credence with the members who were being forced to join them.
    [quote]this is a sad occasion for them, but if they really want to make changes where they work, they need to come back fighting with their own all nurses union.......leave the nonnursing unions and nonnursing politics out of it! [quote]

    again i ask, why does there have to be a union involved for nurses to stand up for what they believe in? why not come back and work with all involved in patient care to make your institution the best? it's obvious at sjmmc that the union has done nothing to improve patient care, in my opinion, so why add another layer. i do agree that a rn run union would get more respect from nurses worried about promoting a professional image than that of a trade union

    [quote] i bow with respect to the nurses at st. john's hospital who dared to make a difference where they work. [quote]

    although i don't agree with the method these nurses used, i too must give them credit for at least taking a stand.
  3. by   Sheri257
    Quote from oncbsnrn
    When the shortage reaches the point where nurses are in that great of demand, the percieved need to unionize will even be less-supply and demand will drive the wages, benefits ect up. Supply and demand is what drives the market, not union membership in my opinon
    I think you need both: a strong union and a labor shortage. Sure, wages probably do increase somewhat in a shortage, but not as much as when you have a shortage and a strong union.

    Even though the shortage in California is acute, wages didn't increase in my particular area until one of the hospitals was unionized. The hospital refused to pay until the nurses organized and threatened to walk out. If you look at the highest paying jobs in California, most of them can be found in union facilities.

    All previous attempts to get a pay raise failed without the union, that is: nurses organizing and threatening to walk out in large numbers. But the threat, and the union, wouldn't have had much clout if there hadn't been a shortage. The two factors go hand in hand, IMHO.

    A strong union can also improve working conditions, not just pay checks. Look at California's ratio law: I believe the California Nurses Association was able to get the first nurse patient ratio law passed in this country because:

    1) It's a union that's actually run by RN's with a lot of support from RN's

    2) The shortage is acute in this state and, consequently, the union has a lot more political clout, especially since nurses organize and pool their resources together through the union.

    There's no way the ratio law would have been passed in California without a strong union. The fact that similar ratio law proposals have failed in other states is proof of that.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jan 23, '05

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