Judge reluctantly acquits midwife. - page 5

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Judge reluctantly acquits midwife Calls her behavior 'abhorrent' in Bloomfield baby's death... Read More


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    Quote from Honnête et Sérieux
    I have first-hand observed the unfolding tragedy of home-birth misadventures, and when they go wrong, we take them to a high-risk obstetrical facility with neonatal capabilities...never the other way around.
    I can't remember the name of the family in Scranton, PA, who made the news for doing just as you say. The obstetrician got a judge to declare that the baby would die unless certain interventions were taken. The couple snuck out of the hospital to get to another hospital where the baby was born perfectly fine, without the interventions "required" by the obstetrician and judge.
    There are plenty of times when obstetricians cause problems, but because they are equipped to handle lots of problems, they can cover over the mistakes. Even the infamous Dr. Amy who hates midwives recently posted a pretty horrific story of huge blunders when she was working in a hospital, but she still doesn't seem to understand that people would try to avoid additional interventions. Take Allegheny General Hospital - if I remember correctly, they are (or were a couple years ago) on the top 5 or 10 list in the country for mistakes in cleanliness and disease transmission between patients. Is that really the best shot at survival?
    Last edit by sirI on May 23, '09
    cmonkey and fromtheseaRN like this.
  2. 1
    Quote from jondaley
    I can't remember the name of the family in Scranton, PA, who made the news for doing just as you say. The obstetrician got a judge to declare that the baby would die unless certain interventions were taken. The couple snuck out of the hospital to get to another hospital where the baby was born perfectly fine, without the interventions "required" by the obstetrician and judge.
    There are plenty of times when obstetricians cause problems, but because they are equipped to handle lots of problems, they can cover over the mistakes. Even the infamous Dr. Amy who hates midwives recently posted a pretty horrific story of huge blunders when she was working in a hospital, but she still doesn't seem to understand that people would try to avoid additional interventions. Take Allegheny General Hospital - if I remember correctly, they are (or were a couple years ago) on the top 5 or 10 list in the country for mistakes in cleanliness and disease transmission between patients. Is that really the best shot at survival?

    That said, there are problems with the issues you introduced; why would comparing one hospital to another have anything to do with this? Unless you are comparing the cleanliness and capability of a hospital with that of midwives, then you might as well be comparing fast-food restaurants.

    I'd like to know what "problems" are cause by obstetricians. Are they "problems" that are NOT cause by midwives?

    And I'd like to see some references; I don't base discussions on heresay.
    Last edit by sirI on May 23, '09
    lindarn likes this.
  3. 0
    It's not that hard to find people who are suing their doctor for one reason or another.

    Try searching on google for "problems caused by obstetricians" or "why are malpractice insurance rates so high for obstetricians", etc.

    And no, problems caused by obstetricians is a completely different set than could be caused by midwives (at least midwives in a non-hospital setting). I've never heard of a mom dying from a c-section at the hands of a midwife. Nor pitocin problems. Or forced inductions when the baby isn't ready, etc. etc. etc. All of these issues don't come up with (most) midwives, since those options aren't available to them.

    The Scranton story where the doctors were clearly wrong in their diagnosis, and got a judge to try to coerce their patient into doing their will is here: http://www.lifenews.com/state325.html

    I find the quote in your signature about giving money and power to the government interesting: I totally agree with that, and would say the same thing about doctors. But, I guess you would disagree about that extension of your quote?
    Last edit by sirI on May 23, '09
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    My view on childbirth and medicine in general is "where would the person be most comfortable?" I have no kids, but I did recently have a hysto, and had myself discharged early because I figured that I could care for myself at home better than they could in the hospital. I think the same would go for childbirth. I prefer less intrusion and more control. With a home birth, you control where, how and why. I want to eat, I eat. I want to sleep, I go to bed. I want to try sqatting to give birth, then I can try it. Yes, giving birth is hard work, by let my body do it's job. I hated my maternity rotations because I saw that women were being induced to suit the doctor's schedule, not the woman's. Not inducing fast enough? C-section Stat. Vacuum extraction? You are not serious? Stirups so that you are trying to push the baby uphill just doesn't make sense for me. The hospital will strap you in so that you can't get up to walk off a contraction. You are bullied into doing it they way they want it done. Birth plan-out the window. I really wanted kids, but was unable to. I had a home birth plan just in case. My own suroundings, with the people I wanted there. No one poking at me, no medical students just watching without introducing themselves. There is a lot to be said for home births and a family being created in one's home. Yes, there are risks, but the aggravation factor alone would make me seriously consider another alternative to the hospital version. In school, I wanted to work maternity. I love babies, but the military like condition I found in all 3 of my city's hospitals have put me off. There is a role for a well trained midwife.


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