Jobs for New Grads - The Big Lie? - page 4

by chuckster

9,617 Views | 58 Comments

a recent article available in medscape is one of an increasing number of pieces that are finally painting a realistic picture of the nursing job market in the us. link here: note that registration (free) may be required... Read More


  1. 5
    I started out as a nontraditional student, 5 years ago. I did not get into nursing because I was promised or guaranteed employment. I have true passion. To answer your question, there were a lot of promises made by professors and nursing instructors/administrators that we would have no trouble finding a job.

    Last February, 4 nurses from a major Atlanta hospital came to visit one of my senior classes. They told us the truth, finally, that many hospitals were on a hiring freeze and especially with new graduates. They explained the cost of hiring a new grad and how risky it was to a hospital's purse. That was a year ago. I feel like from 2007 to 2010, until those 4 ladies entered the classroom, I was lied to, period.

    I am diligently searching, as I have been, and searching everywhere in nursing homes, home health agencies, and doctor's offices. I've even applied to a tech job and was rejected. I called that hospital, practically in tears. They said that they wanted their employees in their positions for at least two years and that I would want to leave for another position before two years! Can you believe that? Former classmates who have jobs, know someone in the hospital system or worked at that hospital during school as a tech. I pretty much found the same true as a student trying to find employment as a tech. If you didn't know someone, you weren't in.

    I feel like I'm losing the skills that I did acquire in school. I feel like I worked too hard, for five long years, to not have a position somewhere as a nurse.
    joanna73, lindarn, Esme12, and 2 others like this.
  2. 4
    Quote from netglow
    My college went along on it all, that is up until our pinning where the DON told the audience that we would have some serious problems finding work, that, nobody was hiring and the forecast was dire. We were like, whaaaaaaaa? You could see the look of shock in the audience of family members..
    Almost exactly the same thing here! Except it was our guest speaker!!! I'm sure our DON and other faculty where shocked too, secret's out, so to speak.
    joanna73, lindarn, Esme12, and 1 other like this.
  3. 3
    At least the word is finally leaking out at least a little.
    lindarn, Not_A_Hat_Person, and nursel56 like this.
  4. 7
    Quote from CrunchRN
    At least the word is finally leaking out at least a little.
    Problem is far too many are drinking the Kool-Aid about there being a "nursing shortage" and or for other reasons (employment security, personal satisfaction, etc...) and rushing into programs. While there is nothing wrong per se with any of that the thing is just what does one do after graduation and licensure if no one will hire.

    On the flip side the general public at large continue to think that if a nurse isn't working there is something "wrong" with her or him. People seem to think nurses rake in big money and can always pick up hours to make more, thus always have job security but are good for a touch if required.

    Unlike other degrees/diplomas where one can cool one's jets doing something else until the job market opens up it seems new grads have a shelf life. Once it expires and they become stale it becomes that much harder to find a gig if anyone will take them on at all. It doesn't help that every six to twelve months hundreds of new grads are produced and the cycle continues.

    Someone really needs to get the ear of a national news reporter (ABC, NBC, etc..) and get this story out there. Otherwise there is going to be a *huge* backlash as word spreads there are huge numbers of un or under employed new grads many of whom may never work as nurses at all.

    I've given over to advising anyone seriously considering going into nursing for "personal satisfaction" goals to consider becoming a tech first. Work seems a bit more easily had and steady, plus one obtains tons of direct patient care interaction. Finally it does seem those with hospital experience and or know someone *inside* stand a better shot of landing a gig after NS than those without.
    dishes, lindarn, Esme12, and 4 others like this.
  5. 0
    I would say that the nurse shortage is indeed true. But in the end it all depends what area of the country you go decided to work at where they are hiring. But you are always going to see the same pattern the older nurses are not retiring because of the financial situation of many. That in turn hurt the chances for the New Grads. That is why it is always a good idea to get some kind of extern because those are the ones they usually hire because the New Grad knows the system of the hospital.
  6. 1
    I am in the same boat as you and I feel like the nuRsing career is failing me. I graduated as a RN a year ago and I have applied to a zillion jobs only to be told I have no experience. So I ask myself how will I get experience if no one will give me a chance. But some of my classmates have gotten jobs in a hospital because they know somebody . I am a good worker and I have the skills to care for patients but am frustrated and am about to give up on nursing
    lmhendersonrn likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from chuckster
    a recent article available in medscape is one of an increasing number of pieces that are finally painting a realistic picture of the nursing job market in the us.

    link here: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/755051?src=top10

    note that registration (free) may be required to view the complete article.

    i read this article when it was published, i instantly felt depressed and a bit lost. then i went online and looked around for jobs in my area. there were several being offered. it was a bit reassuring even seeing in the ads that they were hiring new grads. this doesn't guarantee a job placement for me but it's more encouraging than the article depicts.
    lindarn likes this.
  8. 5
    Quote from vampymegs

    i read this article when it was published, i instantly felt depressed and a bit lost. then i went online and looked around for jobs in my area. there were several being offered. it was a bit reassuring even seeing in the ads that they were hiring new grads. this doesn't guarantee a job placement for me but it's more encouraging than the article depicts.
    this is the problem. they are posting jobs, but they aren't filling them. speaking from experience the article speaks the truth whether anyone wants to admit or not add this will continue an issue until the "cranking" out of nursing grads at such alarming numbers stops. do good then go is right. other degrees are much more forgiving when the degree isn't "used". with a nursing degree the longer away you go rom graduation your chances of being hired decreases greatly to a point where refresher courses are required before being considered for any positions. there will be a huge "generation" of nurses that have enormous debt and are not employed.......this debt will follow you to your grave and cannot be dispursed through bankrupcy.

    i find it slightly amusing, however, that the single most thing lacking from the new grad is "clinical experience".......the one thing a diploma program supplied in abundance

    see how far we've come?
  9. 2
    Quote from Esme12
    I find it slightly amusing, however, that the single most thing lacking from the new grad is "clinical experience".......the one thing a diploma program supplied in abundance

    See how far we've come?
    I agree with most of what you're saying however, it's not clinical experience as in nursing school clinical experience, I have over 300 hours of "student nurse" clinical experience in my program. It's one year of clinical experience as a licensed registered nurse.
    DizzyLizzyNurse and lindarn like this.
  10. 4
    Quote from Esme12
    . . .I find it slightly amusing, however, that the single most thing lacking from the new grad is "clinical experience".......the one thing a diploma program supplied in abundance

    See how far we've come?
    Ha! Last night I was thinking - what we really need is a program that integrates the classroom experience with gradual introduction to increasing patient load so these expensive extended orientations could be shortened - busy nurses who don't want to be preceptors would save the new nurses from a negative experience and how about we split the difference and make it a 3 yr program and---- oh. Yeah. That sounds vaguely familiar.
    Purple_Scrubs, lindarn, joanna73, and 1 other like this.


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