Jobs hard to find for new nurses.  Duh! Jobs hard to find for new nurses. Duh! | allnurses

Jobs hard to find for new nurses. Duh!

  1. 5 when john jerzak started nursing school in mid-2006, hospitals were offering $5,000 signing bonuses to nurses who promised to stay in their jobs for a year. predictions that the country faced years of nursing shortages were a "mantra," jerzak said.
    the promise of that level of job security was appealing to a guy who had spent decades in a blue-collar airline job and was enduring post-9/11 pay and pension cuts.

    "i really felt that it would be like picking low-hanging fruit from a tree, and the choices would be abundant," said jerzak, who is 55 and lives in springfield, delaware county.

    what a difference a recession makes.

    http://www.philly.com/philly/business/83184657.html
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  2. 33 Comments

  3. Visit  want2banurse35 profile page
    #1 2
    Wow hiring BSN's only. I hope this doesnt become a trend.
  4. Visit  llg profile page
    #2 2
    Wow. Drexel went from 16 students to 1,000 students in 10 years.
  5. Visit  oramar profile page
    #3 11
    This is a improvement over those endless "nursing is a recession proof profession" articles. At least people will be graduating with realistic expectations.
  6. Visit  Cindy-san profile page
    #4 4
    Wait are those 1,000 students all nursing?! How the flying fig trees do they get clinical time/slots/instructors for all those students?!!
  7. Visit  Ginger's Mom profile page
    #5 3
    In Boston new grad jobs are usually BSN only.

    I agree it is a cycle. But we need to learn from our past shortages, don't burn out your current nurses.
    '
  8. Visit  redbeans profile page
    #6 1
    I'm in an ADN program and on the first day one of our instructors told is to get our BSN within in a few years. I planned to take a few years off and then get it anyway.....but for those that don't or if I don't follow my plan, I hope it doesn't.

    I just want to get finish this program first. This is the best route for me at this point.
  9. Visit  hiddencatRN profile page
    #7 3
    Quote from Cindy-san
    Wait are those 1,000 students all nursing?! How the flying fig trees do they get clinical time/slots/instructors for all those students?!!
    We're placed throughout the tri-state region. Hahnemann is *definitely* not large enough to accommodate us. The clinical groups are 6-8 students, and I think each clinical instructor has maybe 3 or 4 clinical classes?
  10. Visit  JenniferSews profile page
    #8 2
    Thanks Captain Obvious!!! Preach it sista! My city had 2 BSN options and 3 ADN CCs when I started my prereqs and the 3 year wait list. They added 3 new for profit schools offering BSNs with no wait list in roughly 2 years, churning out hundreds of new grads twice a year. It's insane!
  11. Visit  Meriwhen profile page
    #9 3
    At least he stayed in the other job long enough to snag the pension...the year off between graduation and looking for work may not have helped land a nursing job, but he's got some income to live off of while he looks.
  12. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    #10 5
    Not for nothing, but 40k to 50k may be "good income" for Phila, but that is barely middle class in NYC.

    The article does make some excellent points, especially about nursing shortages running in cycles, and regarding the trend of nursing jobs outside of hospitals.

    There really needs to be some national involvement to address the problems new grads are having. Medicare pays for physican training, and it would be good if something along those lines could be done for nursing. Maybe some sort of tax credit to assist hospitals in covering the cost of hiring and training new grads.

    In tight financial times, hospitals are very reluctant to spend the funds and time on training "unproven" (if that is the proper word), graduate nurses, and or nurses with little or no experience. It can cost upwards of 30k to train a new grad, money that is down the drain if she does not pass the NCLEX, and or does not last long enough for the hospital to recoup it's investment. This is has been long been true for all businesses, and now that hospitals are operating more along those lines it has caught up with them as well.

    The real fly in the ointment is going to be what the health care landscape looks like once this current "crisis" ends. Hospitals by and large were the largest employers of nurses, and that scene is changing. Changes in populations, demographics and economics probably means more acute care hospitals will either close, merge or scale down. Population shifts into the South, SouthEast and West means there could be new or expanded hospitals in those areas, but not every nurse can pack up and move house.

    Finally there is the increasing use of unlicensed or "techs", that hospitals have found as a boon to increase productivity in nursing, without actually hiring more RNs. Seems like each month brings a new sort of "tech" on the scene that is peeling away yet another nursing function.
  13. Visit  AtomicWoman profile page
    #11 0
    Quote from want2banurse35
    Wow hiring BSN's only. I hope this doesnt become a trend.
    Main Line Health is mentioned in the article. I noticed in their description of their nurse residency program that they are now only hiring BSNs. UPenn also only hires BSNs. In this buyer's market, the hospitals can be more choosy. Whether that will remain the trend into the future is uncertain.
  14. Visit  Simba&NalasMom profile page
    #12 3
    Quote from Cindy-san
    Wait are those 1,000 students all nursing?! How the flying fig trees do they get clinical time/slots/instructors for all those students?!!
    Flying fig trees??? LOL!!!!!!

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