Jobs for New Grads - The Big Lie? - page 3

a recent article available in medscape is one of an increasing number of pieces that are finally painting a realistic picture of the nursing job market in the us. link here: note that... Read More

  1. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    2
    Am going to roll many responses into one post.

    While one has long advocated creating nursing residencies along the lines of what is offered for post grad physicans, the more one thinks about it closely the scheme would be difficult to implement and cost dear.

    There are far to many nursing grads every six or twelve months to be absorbed by most local hospitals. Then there would be the question of wages/benefits for "probie" nurses and whom should cover them in all or part. Who is going to set the level? What is to keep a hospital from hiring a bunch of "newbie" nurses at below current scale then chucking them out after a year to start all over again. Will hospitals be happy with a portion of their nursing service always rotating in and out every year? While post grads are paid wages they also perform billable services; nurses (bedside) do not thus are strictly a cost so hospitals may not welcome other "mouths to feed" without clear benefits to them upto and including their cost being borne for the most part by someone else (see above).

    As for shutting down schools of nursing, been there and done that from about the 1970's through 1980' when enrollments plummented. So what happened? When the "nursing shortage" bells began ringing (yes I know but we're not on that right now, *LOL*) there weren't enough seats to train new nurses. Shutting down a program is the easy part, starting one up is difficult and expensive. Being as all that may, personally think there will be a gradual culling of the herd but will come as with most things from hospitals. If the "BSN preferred/only" trend becomes the norm in some areas, along with facilites being very picky about whom they hire there are bound to be enough unemployed or employable nurses from certain programs to cause their demise.

    Finally one must say while everyone seems keen to land a hospital gig (understandable) the push from federal government and other sources is towards less in hospital care and more home/community based service. From prevention to delivery more and more healthcare is going to be taking place in future away from hospitals. This could be LTC,ACS,home and or any other setting . Once you go down that road it equates to less need for hospital beds aside from various levels of acute care and a few other services. For anyone considering entering the profession and or those already in this means future employment choices may be limited.
    jtmarcy12 and Esme12 like this.
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  3. Visit  fiveofpeep profile page
    0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    What is to keep a hospital from hiring a bunch of "newbie" nurses at below current scale then chucking them out after a year to start all over again.
    It's extremely expensive.
  4. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    2
    Quote from fiveofpeep
    It's extremely expensive.
    True dat!

    But one was thinking more if some sort of scheme were put into place where funding for such nurses did not come out of the hospital's purse.
    Esme12 and fiveofpeep like this.
  5. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Am going to roll many responses into one post.

    While one has long advocated creating nursing residencies along the lines of what is offered for post grad physicans, the more one thinks about it closely the scheme would be difficult to implement and cost dear.

    There are far to many nursing grads every six or twelve months to be absorbed by most local hospitals. Then there would be the question of wages/benefits for "probie" nurses and whom should cover them in all or part. Who is going to set the level? What is to keep a hospital from hiring a bunch of "newbie" nurses at below current scale then chucking them out after a year to start all over again.
    It would be necessary to have more hospital/school interface than we have currently and would most definitely mean that (like medical residencies) there would need to be "teaching hospitals" for nurses and hiring a new grad wouldn't necessarily mean a guaranteed job at that place - nor would it mean the full RN wage for that period of time. The idea would be that they would then have a year of recent hospital experience - greatly increasing their desirability to hospitals closer to home.

    Lord knows the government (both federal and state) wastes money on enough things already. I'm anything but a "tax and spend" person but giving students a leg up has been one of the better things our taxpayer dollars have gone to imo. We generally help out people who are casualties of unforeseen economic factors as well.

    If - as you say they "cull the herd" and hospitals hire based on BSN vs not we'll need to drastically overhaul the system anyway unless we're willing to leave current ASN students in the lurch and have every community college based program wither up and die. If that were to happen we'd be back to fewer seats and shut a whole lot of potentially great nurses out due to the increased cost of living away from home and part-time options for parents or second-career students. Are there currently enough bridges between 2 year and 4 year colleges that a current student can seamlessly move to a BSN program?

    All of these ideas are nothing but brainstorming on my part but that plus increasing public awareness of the truth (otherwise no "New Nurse Bill" would have a snowball's chance in hell of being passed). We have to start somewhere!
    Last edit by nursel56 on Jan 17, '12
  6. Visit  lmhendersonrn profile page
    5
    I started out as a nontraditional student, 5 years ago. I did not get into nursing because I was promised or guaranteed employment. I have true passion. To answer your question, there were a lot of promises made by professors and nursing instructors/administrators that we would have no trouble finding a job.

    Last February, 4 nurses from a major Atlanta hospital came to visit one of my senior classes. They told us the truth, finally, that many hospitals were on a hiring freeze and especially with new graduates. They explained the cost of hiring a new grad and how risky it was to a hospital's purse. That was a year ago. I feel like from 2007 to 2010, until those 4 ladies entered the classroom, I was lied to, period.

    I am diligently searching, as I have been, and searching everywhere in nursing homes, home health agencies, and doctor's offices. I've even applied to a tech job and was rejected. I called that hospital, practically in tears. They said that they wanted their employees in their positions for at least two years and that I would want to leave for another position before two years! Can you believe that? Former classmates who have jobs, know someone in the hospital system or worked at that hospital during school as a tech. I pretty much found the same true as a student trying to find employment as a tech. If you didn't know someone, you weren't in.

    I feel like I'm losing the skills that I did acquire in school. I feel like I worked too hard, for five long years, to not have a position somewhere as a nurse.
    joanna73, lindarn, Esme12, and 2 others like this.
  7. Visit  lmhendersonrn profile page
    4
    Quote from netglow
    My college went along on it all, that is up until our pinning where the DON told the audience that we would have some serious problems finding work, that, nobody was hiring and the forecast was dire. We were like, whaaaaaaaa? You could see the look of shock in the audience of family members..
    Almost exactly the same thing here! Except it was our guest speaker!!! I'm sure our DON and other faculty where shocked too, secret's out, so to speak.
    joanna73, lindarn, Esme12, and 1 other like this.
  8. Visit  CrunchRN profile page
    3
    At least the word is finally leaking out at least a little.
    lindarn, Not_A_Hat_Person, and nursel56 like this.
  9. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    7
    Quote from CrunchRN
    At least the word is finally leaking out at least a little.
    Problem is far too many are drinking the Kool-Aid about there being a "nursing shortage" and or for other reasons (employment security, personal satisfaction, etc...) and rushing into programs. While there is nothing wrong per se with any of that the thing is just what does one do after graduation and licensure if no one will hire.

    On the flip side the general public at large continue to think that if a nurse isn't working there is something "wrong" with her or him. People seem to think nurses rake in big money and can always pick up hours to make more, thus always have job security but are good for a touch if required.

    Unlike other degrees/diplomas where one can cool one's jets doing something else until the job market opens up it seems new grads have a shelf life. Once it expires and they become stale it becomes that much harder to find a gig if anyone will take them on at all. It doesn't help that every six to twelve months hundreds of new grads are produced and the cycle continues.

    Someone really needs to get the ear of a national news reporter (ABC, NBC, etc..) and get this story out there. Otherwise there is going to be a *huge* backlash as word spreads there are huge numbers of un or under employed new grads many of whom may never work as nurses at all.

    I've given over to advising anyone seriously considering going into nursing for "personal satisfaction" goals to consider becoming a tech first. Work seems a bit more easily had and steady, plus one obtains tons of direct patient care interaction. Finally it does seem those with hospital experience and or know someone *inside* stand a better shot of landing a gig after NS than those without.
    dishes, lindarn, Esme12, and 4 others like this.
  10. Visit  young_gun_np profile page
    0
    I would say that the nurse shortage is indeed true. But in the end it all depends what area of the country you go decided to work at where they are hiring. But you are always going to see the same pattern the older nurses are not retiring because of the financial situation of many. That in turn hurt the chances for the New Grads. That is why it is always a good idea to get some kind of extern because those are the ones they usually hire because the New Grad knows the system of the hospital.
  11. Visit  Georgiapeach73 profile page
    1
    I am in the same boat as you and I feel like the nuRsing career is failing me. I graduated as a RN a year ago and I have applied to a zillion jobs only to be told I have no experience. So I ask myself how will I get experience if no one will give me a chance. But some of my classmates have gotten jobs in a hospital because they know somebody . I am a good worker and I have the skills to care for patients but am frustrated and am about to give up on nursing
    lmhendersonrn likes this.
  12. Visit  vampymegs profile page
    1
    Quote from chuckster
    a recent article available in medscape is one of an increasing number of pieces that are finally painting a realistic picture of the nursing job market in the us.

    link here: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/755051?src=top10

    note that registration (free) may be required to view the complete article.
    i read this article when it was published, i instantly felt depressed and a bit lost. then i went online and looked around for jobs in my area. there were several being offered. it was a bit reassuring even seeing in the ads that they were hiring new grads. this doesn't guarantee a job placement for me but it's more encouraging than the article depicts.
    lindarn likes this.
  13. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    5
    Quote from vampymegs
    i read this article when it was published, i instantly felt depressed and a bit lost. then i went online and looked around for jobs in my area. there were several being offered. it was a bit reassuring even seeing in the ads that they were hiring new grads. this doesn't guarantee a job placement for me but it's more encouraging than the article depicts.
    this is the problem. they are posting jobs, but they aren't filling them. speaking from experience the article speaks the truth whether anyone wants to admit or not add this will continue an issue until the "cranking" out of nursing grads at such alarming numbers stops. do good then go is right. other degrees are much more forgiving when the degree isn't "used". with a nursing degree the longer away you go rom graduation your chances of being hired decreases greatly to a point where refresher courses are required before being considered for any positions. there will be a huge "generation" of nurses that have enormous debt and are not employed.......this debt will follow you to your grave and cannot be dispursed through bankrupcy.

    i find it slightly amusing, however, that the single most thing lacking from the new grad is "clinical experience".......the one thing a diploma program supplied in abundance

    see how far we've come?
  14. Visit  lmhendersonrn profile page
    2
    Quote from Esme12
    I find it slightly amusing, however, that the single most thing lacking from the new grad is "clinical experience".......the one thing a diploma program supplied in abundance

    See how far we've come?
    I agree with most of what you're saying however, it's not clinical experience as in nursing school clinical experience, I have over 300 hours of "student nurse" clinical experience in my program. It's one year of clinical experience as a licensed registered nurse.
    DizzyLizzyNurse and lindarn like this.


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