It's here: BSN only hiring in hospitals

  1. 4
    despite bsn in 10 legislation being stalled and north dakota removing bsn requirement~2003, employers are now in the drivers seat seeking bsn only grads. this is possible due to:

    1. early 2000's push to increase nursing education programs due to shortage and creation of accelerated bsn programs --swelling ranks of grads by 2009.
    2. economic downturn: nurses working increased hours, 2 jobs supporting families as spouses/s.o. laid off.
    3. nursing studies proving higher % bsn staff; adequate staffing meeting guidelines = less patients deaths.
    4. quality groups + reports like iom recommending bsn.
    5. acceptance of ana magnet status.
    6. desire for highest educated workforce to care for increased intensity of care required by hospitalized patients.

    northeast area urban hospitals from philadelphia to boston along with so. california on this bandwagon.

    nursing spectrum articles expand above:
    it's academic: studies spur push to bsn-in-10 | national nursing news

    hospitals begin to require bsns, aren’t waiting on bsn in 10 legislation

    those considering nursing schools really need to do their homework re what employers are requiring in job ads, online posted positions prior to choosing program.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Mar 18, '11
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  4. 320 Comments so far...

  5. 24
    As often as one is likely to see the phrases "BSN required" or "BSN preferred", it is stark handwriting on the wall that people starting out in nursing should heed.
  6. 23
    Even though I have no intention of trying to pursue a BSN at this late stage of my career I don't think this is a bad thing. It is only right for nursing to reach to be the best. The time has definitely come.
    joanna73, tahoe77, LadyEJ BSN, RN, and 20 others like this.
  7. 18
    I looked at EMS and wondered when employers will start preferring 2 year degrees for medics instead of just a certification. Then I realized that the trend is toward the Fire Based-Technicians, not the Medical Based-Providers. Thus, the field will remain a vocation or stepping stone, not a career.

    When I looked at nursing and saw a move towards the educated nursing provider and high valuation of education, I saw a professional caring career and chose nursing over EMS.

    It's a unusual thing when employers start demanding higher degrees when there is an excess of labor supply instead of just trying to depress wages. That is the mark of a professional field.
    tahoe77, LadyEJ BSN, RN, not.done.yet, and 15 others like this.
  8. 101
    Quote from SummitAP
    That is the mark of a professional field.
    True professions are able to adequately control the numbers of people who enter that particular field. Medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, pharmacy, and other healthcare professions have succeeded at limiting the number of people who join their ranks. This has resulted in higher salaries, decent availability of jobs, and ideal working conditions for these professionals.

    However, the nursing profession has failed to control the number of people entering the field, and nurses are now a dime a dozen. Masses of nurses have been churned out into local job markets over the past few years. Wages are stagnant, and have even decreased in some metro areas. Many nurses, new and experienced, cannot find employment. In addition, nursing programs continue to admit record numbers of people when the demand is drying up.

    I feel that the nursing profession is shooting itself in the foot.
  9. 40
    Quote from TheCommuter
    True professions are able to adequately control the numbers of people who enter that particular field. Medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, pharmacy, and other healthcare professions have succeeded at limiting the number of people who join their ranks. This has resulted in higher salaries, decent availability of jobs, and ideal working conditions for these professionals.

    However, the nursing profession has failed to control the number of people entering the field, and nurses are now a dime a dozen. Masses of nurses have been churned out into local job markets over the past few years. Wages are stagnant, and have even decreased in some metro areas. Many nurses, new and experienced, cannot find employment. In addition, nursing programs continue to admit record numbers of people when the demand is drying up.

    I feel that the nursing profession is shooting itself in the foot.
    What do you mean exactly? Hurting itself by now requiring higher education for the best-paying jobs? Or hurting itself by not restricting entry into practice?

    If you mean the first, I disagree. If you mean the second, I heartily agree.

    The quality of nursing education has seriously declined over the past 10 years -- not at all schools, but at many. Too many schools have opened up, expanded, or accelerated. They are pushing too many people through too fast without maintaining a high standard. That's a big cause for the dissatisfaction, high turnover rates, etc. Too many nurses are graduating unprepared to handle the real world of nursing. It's wasting lots of resources that could be used on real solutions to our problems.

    And as those poorly-prepared nurses become senior staff members, charge nurses, preceptors, managers, teachers, etc., the quality of our leadership declines, too. That makes the work environment even worse.

    I am happy to see just about ANY effort to raise standards and applaud it as a step in the right direction -- even though I recognize that there are some terrific ADN schools and nurses out there as well as some terrible BSN schools and nurses. As painful as the process may be, we can't let individual cases determine general policy. We need general policies that will raise the standards within our profession and this is one way to encourage that.

    Sadly, some very good people (and programs) will be hurt by that process -- but the hospitals trying to raise their standards are not the cause of the problem.
    hikernurse, RNbeacon, LadyEJ BSN, RN, and 37 others like this.
  10. 8
    I agree with TheCommuter. I am currently in my BSN program due to a goal of persuing my CRNA. However, I do feel like every college should only offer the BSN programs due to the amount of required courses and length of time to obtain the ASN degree. I feel if we limit the amount of applications accepted into the programs we will be able to stop the decline in wages, increase in unsafe practices, and redefine nursing. Evey years you hear and see how jobs are requiring more and more degrees and qualifications for positions whether it be management, critical care, NICU, educational, etc none of them are willing to accept the responsibility to compensate that nurse for all their hard work. Most of all for their accomplishments in their education. Doctors are compensated for their educations and certifications, why aren't nurses? We are usually the one that work harder, give up more, and then put a smile on our face and assist those in need for hours on in. Some of those hours are the patient's last hours of life. Why should we not also be acknowledged for our dication and education.
  11. 24
    Quote from llg
    What do you mean exactly? Hurting itself by now requiring higher education for the best-paying jobs? Or hurting itself by not restricting entry into practice?
    Perhaps I should have clarified my previous post. I feel that the nursing profession has shot itself in the foot by not restricting entry into practice. When compared to other professions, there are very few (if any) barriers in entering the nursing profession. Since virtually anyone can enter nursing nowadays, nurses have become a dime a dozen in local employment markets.
  12. 7
    Hey everyone

    To manipulate the supply of nurses into the field by regulating class size, is a number-cruncher's answer to a non mathematical problem. But for businesses to desire more from their new grads will ultimately thin the field, because not as many people will be as motivated or capable to acquire a BSN. Consequently producing more educated and capable staff, and reducing the influx of personnel.
    elprup, DayOhioRn, HopefulCaryn, and 4 others like this.
  13. 6
    127,609 Graduates passed the NCLEX last year, in 2001 there were only 58,319. In the last 10 years the amount of nursing graduates has more than doubled. There are now nearly as many BSN prepped nurses entering the work force every year as there were total nurses entering the field 10 years ago. The hospitals can't be blamed, all things being equal they are going to go for the new grad with more education, that simple business, and is re-enforeced by the evidence that a high ratio of BSN preped nurses increases quality and effectiveness of care.

    The flood gates are open on nursing education, California CC's are running over capacity and still have multi-year waiting lists. There is no stopping the rush for nursing, and as long as students continue to go for it there will still be schools that train them. This will just put more stress on applicants to strive for the best grades possiable and to get into the most saught after schools.

    There should be no moderation of entry into practice, if a student wants to go for nursing they should be allowed (I don't think any of us would want to be turned away), but should also be informed of the market, and that nursing is not a easy job to get or do and that massive amounts of debt are ill advised.


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