Is Nursing Still an Attractive Career Choice? | allnurses

Is Nursing Still an Attractive Career Choice?

  1. 1 At a time of grim prospects for Americans without a college degree, nursing can look like a rare chance not just for a job but a real career.

    Or at least it did.

    http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2013/...career-choice/
  2. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page

    About DoGoodThenGo

    From 'La Pomme Grand - NY'; Joined Jul '09; Posts: 3,926; Likes: 4,920.

    69 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    11
    It's about time someone paid attention to what I have been saying for a couple of years now...there is no shortage! and there are NO guaranteed jobs!
    NMGirlRN, Ruas61, SoldierNurse22, and 8 others like this.
  4. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    13
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    At a time of grim prospects for Americans without a college degree, nursing can look like a rare chance not just for a job but a real career.

    Or at least it did.

    Is Nursing Still an Attractive Career Choice? - Real Time Economics - WSJ
    *** Well the WSJ comes very late to it's wisdom. I clearly remember reading silly, gushing, articels about the vast and looming "nursing shortage" in WSJ back in the mid to late 90's. It was low qualiety reporting and iresponsible journalism.
    Even in the linked to piece:

    " For example, vital signs measurement, once a common task for LPNs in hospitals, is increasingly being performed by RNs instead. Meanwhile less demanding tasks, such as blood-pressure measurement, are being assigned to medical and nursing assistants."

    Really?
  5. Visit  abyJR profile page
    2
    With the Obamacare deadline right around the corner, how do you think the demand will change, if at all? Will hospitals need more RNs? Will the demand increase for primary care NPs? Will health care needs, and careers, become less economy dependent? We will see the demands change in 2014 or will institutions take time to catch up with changing demands?
    NMGirlRN and NJnewRN like this.
  6. Visit  dirtyhippiegirl profile page
    3
    The NP bubble has already burst in my area. Area has something like 5 programs churning out grads -- have several coworkers who are still working as RNs a year after licensure because they can't move. Had a NP as a pt who said it took her two years to get her first job (she wanted acute care).
    MBARNBSN, applewhitern, and Esme12 like this.
  7. Visit  HouTx profile page
    4
    Thanks for posting this article. It's great to have a respected media source like WSJ validating what we here on AN have been saying for years.
  8. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    7
    Quote from abyJR
    With the Obamacare deadline right around the corner, how do you think the demand will change, if at all? Will hospitals need more RNs? Will the demand increase for primary care NPs? Will health care needs, and careers, become less economy dependent? We will see the demands change in 2014 or will institutions take time to catch up with changing demands?
    NO..... not for a long time, if at all...maybe there will begin a change around 2019/2020.....right now in some areas of the country the unemployment for new grads is 47%. Obamacare will only make the hospitals spend less money as it is cutting into profit margins.....Obamacare isn't going to help healthcare industry.
  9. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    2
    Quote from Esme12
    NO..... not for a long time, if at all...maybe there will begin a change around 2019/2020.....right now in some areas of the country the unemployment for new grads is 47%. Obamacare will only make the hospitals spend less money as it is cutting into profit margins.....Obamacare isn't going to help healthcare industry.
    **** It does seem to be a huge boon to the insurance industry though.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and KeyMaster like this.
  10. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    9
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    ***
    " For example, vital signs measurement, once a common task for LPNs in hospitals, is increasingly being performed by RNs instead. Meanwhile less demanding tasks, such as blood-pressure measurement, are being assigned to medical and nursing assistants."

    Really?
    That quote confuses my brain.
    MedChica, SoldierNurse22, reeveslpn, and 6 others like this.
  11. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    11
    Or how about this gem from the article:

    There are still jobs for LPNs, especially in the middle of the country, but the postings are mostly in nursing homes, doctor’s offices and long-term care facilities. Such jobs are less prestigious and lower paying than hospital jobs, and are less likely to offer opportunities for advancement

    Less prestigious? According to who?

    And last time I checked, I make way more than my fellow LPNs who work in the hospital. I believe the same goes for RNs, but I can't be sure.

    Did the author do any research? I agree with the "there's no nursing shortage" sentiment, obviously. But this is just lazy, hack writing.
    Bubbles, sallyrnrrt, SoldierNurse22, and 8 others like this.
  12. Visit  ebinbrooklyn profile page
    0
    What is new grad unemployment across degrees - is it 47% overall or 47% for new grad BSNs, new grad ADNs? I know it's not easy anywhere but I'm curious since they emphasize the new, higher barrier to entry.
  13. Visit  Not_A_Hat_Person profile page
    4
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Or how about this gem from the article:

    There are still jobs for LPNs, especially in the middle of the country, but the postings are mostly in nursing homes, doctor's offices and long-term care facilities. Such jobs are less prestigious and lower paying than hospital jobs, and are less likely to offer opportunities for advancement

    Less prestigious? According to who?

    And last time I checked, I make way more than my fellow LPNs who work in the hospital. I believe the same goes for RNs, but I can't be sure.
    Maybe it's regional, but the nursing homes in my area are hellholes, and LTC experience only leads to LTC jobs and home health jobs, which pay even less. Hospitals want nurses with 3-5 years of acute care experience or a small handful of new grads.
    reeveslpn, anotherone, elprup, and 1 other like this.
  14. Visit  jrwest profile page
    0
    To answer your question............ NO.


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