this is an interesting story, nurse turned detective loses job

  1. 1
    http://www.unionleader.com/article/2...WS02/130219408

    "Suspecting that an anesthesiologist might be using narcotics intended for patients, a nurse did her own quick investigation, alerted Elliot Hospital officials about her suspicions and eventually lost her job, according to a recent lawsuit.

    The nurse, Bedford resident Katherine K. Lacoste, switched syringes to test her suspicions that the anesthesiologist had mislabeled a syringe in order to divert a narcotic pain killer, according to a lawsuit on file at Hillsborough County Superior Court North.

    Her fears proved correct, according to the lawsuit. The syringe, although labeled as such, did not contain the pain killer fentanyl. But months after Lacoste took those steps, she found herself peppered with questions from a panel of Elliot Hospital physicians and lawyers.

    She was eventually told to resign or be fired; the employee of 12 years filed suit against her former employer in August 2012.
    "
    TheCommuter likes this.
  2. 19 Comments so far...

  3. 9
    Unfortunately, this story shows that some nurses who do the right thing are too frequently the first ones who are targeted, treated like criminals, and lose their jobs. This is especially true if they are reporting someone vertically higher on the food chain such as a physician or an administrator.

    Anybody remember the nurses who anonymously reported the physician in Winkler County, Texas? They lost their jobs and reputations.
  4. 8
    And what she did was stupid and illega, as well as dangerous. She is lucky she its not facing drug tampering charges a well a a few other charges. She deserved to get fired
    sharpeimom, KelRN215, anotherone, and 5 others like this.
  5. 2
    She should have went at this at a different way. So I had to read the whole article and re-edit this post. At first I thought she should not have gotten fired, but now I'm thinking that she should have gotten fired. She replaced the fentanyl labeled syringe with decadron and labled it fentanly. Suppose it was administered, it would have been the wrong medication.I believe that the doc was diverting, but she was wrong to switch out the syringe.

    One time my supervisor was did something that I felt was illegal and wrong. Long story short was that I have gotten proof, but they way I received proof was on the borderline of illegal, in fact it was. I decided not to go along with my plan to bust that son of a gun, however I did document my suspicions and gave them to the higher ups. Yes, that person still has a job but atleast I felt I did something rather to jeapordize my job and well being.
    Last edit by prnqday on Feb 16, '13
    sharpeimom and Meriwhen like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Unfortunately, this story shows that some nurses who do the right thing are too frequently the first ones who are targeted, treated like criminals, and lose their jobs. This is especially true if they are reporting someone vertically higher on the food chain such as a physician or an administrator.

    Anybody remember the nurses who anonymously reported the physician in Winkler County, Texas? They lost their jobs and reputations.
    But they won in court, the doc and his buddy the sheriff were found guilty of all sorts of charges related to abuse and perjury, and the nurses were completely vindicated.
    natnat122 likes this.
  7. 2
    Yes. But that was YEARS later : /
    natnat122 and anotherone like this.
  8. 8
    Tampering with syringes of drugs could have backfired if it affected a patient. The nurse should have reported her suspicions to the proper people, and allowed them to handle the investigation as directed by hospital policy. Sorry, I don't see this as doing the right thing.
    RNFiona, sharpeimom, KelRN215, and 5 others like this.
  9. 1
    I wonder if they meant ONDANSETRON instead of decadron?

    I think she was ballsy, quick thinking and got the guy. Unfortunately, he makes more money for the hospital 😔😷

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    tokmom likes this.
  10. 6
    "Before the procedure started, the patient was given the local anesthetic lidocaine, the sedative propofol and 1 milligram of fentanyl."

    A milligram of fentanyl??? I sure hope not. That's 1000 micrograms, which would be a pretty impressive dose.
    prnqday, sharpeimom, KelRN215, and 3 others like this.
  11. 3
    Im sure there is way more to the story.....the Dr Quesada "who is not named in the lawsuit" and his wife were brutally attacked in their home in Nov and them in Jan the wife "commits suicide".....

    http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/news/...ord-death.html

    She (the nurse) screwed up. .....She should NEVER have made a switch and played Nancy Drew (as one reader commented in the Manchester Union Leader)

    She had the right intention to protect the patient from diversion but she took the wrong road.
    RNFiona, sharpeimom, and Altra like this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top