Inmates with mental illness neglected

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    http://www.wral.com/news/story/10374729/

    They are out begging for nurses. I always wondered why none of the nurses I know would work for them. Also wondered why they needed nurses so bad with the state benefits and all.

    This is absolutely horrible. Dogs live better than this! And nobody got fired?!?!?! I understand the understaffing and the position it puts us nurses in. But we are also taught not to accept unsafe assignments. I blame whoever is managing this. Its unacceptable!
    I'm sure once the comments open up on the news site that the nurses will be to blame
    Jarnaes and lindarn like this.
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  3. 24 Comments so far...

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    It is sad how we essentially "throw" people away because their behavior doesn't fit within the realm of our acceptability. I think we easily become comfortably numb.
    sweetgeorgia and SDALPN like this.
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    Just as my patients who are told they will never walk and talk, learn to walk and talk, the inmates who people claim will never function in society could possibly be rehabilitated if they were worked with. Instead we "throw" them away. I don't think they have a chance because they are never given one. Somewhere either because of mental illness or parenting they were never given the tools to succeed. Some are doomed to failure. They still have to want to do better and want to work at it. Either way, none of them deserve to be treated in the way the article describes.
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    Just before I landed on this thread I was reading a blog with a post by a Forensic Psychiatrist and this was quoted.

    "Defendants who graduate from mental health courts demonstrate improved life circumstances with regard to housing, quality of life, symptoms and compliance. Some studies have shown mental health courts to result in improvement for as many as 78% of defendants."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mental_health_court

    "Mental health courts link offenders who would ordinarily be prison-bound to long-term community-based treatment. They rely on mental health assessments, individualized treatment plans, and ongoing judicial monitoring to address both the mental health needs of offenders and public safety concerns of communities. Like other problem-solving courts, such as drug courts, domestic violence courts, and community courts, mental health courts seek to address the underlying problems that contribute to criminal behavior"

    Doesn't THAT sound like a much better solution?
    Not_A_Hat_Person and *LadyJane* like this.
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    The list of people in our society who are underserved and uncared for is long and varied; institutionalized criminals, mentally ill or not, are a fairly low priority for me given the insufficient resources available to governments at all levels.
    Flo., imintrouble, and canoehead like this.
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    I'd love to hear points of view from some of the correctional nurses. Its always different working in an environment compared to being on the outside.
    Multicollinearity likes this.
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    I had a 13 week contract at a prison a couple of years ago. I was shocked and amazed at how many inmates not only were on psych meds, but were on the NAME BRAND meds. That means taxpayers are paying for these meds.

    Most would try to cheek their meds and trade or sell them, and some reportedly would say that they were only on them so that they could sleep all day and night, and not have to think about anything.

    I believe that there are many with true mental illness. However, inmates, in my opinion, have better healthcare in general than those of us not in prison or jail, and I find that sad.
    imintrouble likes this.
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    Quote from SDALPN
    Just as my patients who are told they will never walk and talk, learn to walk and talk, the inmates who people claim will never function in society could possibly be rehabilitated if they were worked with. Instead we "throw" them away. I don't think they have a chance because they are never given one. Somewhere either because of mental illness or parenting they were never given the tools to succeed. Some are doomed to failure. They still have to want to do better and want to work at it. Either way, none of them deserve to be treated in the way the article describes.

    I disagree. I feel that many patients use or hide behind mental illness so that they don't have to take responsibility for their actions. In fact, I have seen it first hand.

    And a lot of people who are mentally ill, don't even have a clue that they are. That's "normal" to them!
    subee likes this.
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    This is sad on so many levels.
    How do you fix a system where there is more taking than giving? State Run Mental Health Facilities would be the answer to the more serious end of this dilemma. The seriously mentally ill belong in mental facilities not prisons.
    Too often it seems the policy makers or people at the top who were trusted to do the right things, such as ensuring proper staffing ratios, are only interested in skimming money for themselves. They line their pockets with bonuses for cutting the budgets while leaving everyone at risk -the care givers and patients. Shame on whom ever is/was in charge of that facility.
    When the Madoffs of this world are truly held responsible for their ruthlessness the world will get better.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and LockportRN like this.
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    Someone's head needs to roll. This is just plain laziness and cruelty. It's hard to believe people can be this ignorant, although custody personnel are not always cued in to mental illness, their focus being corrections. Still, anyone with a heart should know it's wrong to allow/force people to live in stool and urine, naked, and in solitary confinement. I'm glad officials are getting involved and demanding answers. That Jenny person in charge should be locked up and see how it feels.


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