How A Nurse Helped Catch A Serial Killer - Her Co-Worker Charles Cullen How A Nurse Helped Catch A Serial Killer - Her Co-Worker Charles Cullen - pg.2 | allnurses

How A Nurse Helped Catch A Serial Killer - Her Co-Worker Charles Cullen - page 2

He was supposed to be an angel of mercy-but he was an angel of death, and likely the most prolific serial killer America has ever seen. Charles Cullen had most recently been a nurse at Somerset... Read More

  1. Visit  NRSKarenRN profile page
    #13 0
    60 Minutes Steve Croft Interview:

    April 28, 2013
    Angel of Death

    Nearly all of the hospitals ex-nurse Charles Cullen worked at were suspicious of the serial killer. So why did his career last 16 years?

  2. Visit  emilio2004 profile page
    #14 1
    I'm not a nurse, but recently I watched Suspicion on the Discovery Channel. On Dec. 10th 1989, my father walked into St. Barnabas Med Center in Livingston NJ with chest pains. 4 days later he was dead at the age of 57. A doctor told us that he went into convulsions, his lungs filled with fluid and he basically drowned to death. When Cullen was arrested, my older brother recognized him as being one of my fathers nurses in the CCU unit of St. Barnabas. When he was imprisoned, I mailed a photo of my father and a letter stating that I know that he killed him. I'm writing this just to thank the nurse who caught him. If you are reading this, thank you from the bottom of my heart.
  3. Visit  WKShadowRN profile page
    #15 2
    Quote from emilio2004
    I'm not a nurse, but recently I watched Suspicion on the Discovery Channel. On Dec. 10th 1989, my father walked into St. Barnabas Med Center in Livingston NJ with chest pains. 4 days later he was dead at the age of 57. A doctor told us that he went into convulsions, his lungs filled with fluid and he basically drowned to death. When Cullen was arrested, my older brother recognized him as being one of my fathers nurses in the CCU unit of St. Barnabas. When he was imprisoned, I mailed a photo of my father and a letter stating that I know that he killed him. I'm writing this just to thank the nurse who caught him. If you are reading this, thank you from the bottom of my heart.
    My condolences. I am extremely sorry for your loss. Bless you and your family.
  4. Visit  Jensmom7 profile page
    #16 1
    Quote from RNewbie
    Does anyone know what made the police even suspect him? Don't most hospitals have software that show if you are accessing too many charts of pt's that are not yours? Did the other nurses who worked with him not notice or mention that he barely charted on his own pts? How does someone do this for years without being suspected...
    The murders started in the 80s. There was no software to track access to charts, because there were no computerized charts then. Just physical charts, in chart racks, or, more likely, strewn about the nurses' station.
  5. Visit  WoosahRN profile page
    #17 1
    The book was really well done. Very detailed but read like the author was there. I read it quickly. My condolences to anyone that encountered him or lost someone at his hands. It's amazing how warped someone can become. From the accounts he was actually a very good nurse. It's so sad that he used his skills for evil. The scary part to me is sometimes we never know what someone is capable of or what goes on inside their head.
  6. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    #18 0
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    60 Minutes Steve Croft Interview:

    April 28, 2013
    Angel of Death

    Nearly all of the hospitals ex-nurse Charles Cullen worked at were suspicious of the serial killer. So why did his career last 16 years?

    Read: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Cullen

    Basically for the same reasons other nurses, doctors and other healthcare professionals/workers with issues and or a wake of suspect behavior had or have no problems finding work; a shortage of personnel and a reluctance (for various reasons noted in the above linked article) of current employers to go on the record with "suspicions".

    From a hospital or other facility's point of view then and pretty much now they have little incentive to own up to and or report suspicious behavior. If they are incorrect in their assumptions the nurse, doctor or whoever can sue the pants off them for liable, and likely win. If they are correct then the patient and or his family/estate can (and likely will) bring legal action for malpractice. Worse their reputation takes a hit from employing the person for a start.

    From a more practical standpoint to those here; you know when a family or estate decides to sue they are going after everything that breathes in the place who has a license who was involved in said patient's care. So if you are on the floor/unit where say Mr. Cullen worked you could be drawn into any malpractice suit. If you actually took care of said patient then you'll likely catch a case. Even if you prevail on court your nerves will be a wreck and a notice is on your record that you were sued.

    So you can see why many nurses and or places would pull a Sargent Shultz "I know nothing... nothing"
  7. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    #19 0
    Quote from Jensmom7
    The murders started in the 80s. There was no software to track access to charts, because there were no computerized charts then. Just physical charts, in chart racks, or, more likely, strewn about the nurses' station.
    Again see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Cullen

    By the 1990's and 2000's Mr. Cullen's final two employers *had* electronic charting/records and worse had begun to notice the strange pattern of death that followed said nurse. One place was even notified by an outside official agency about Mr. Cullen.

    Nothing makes the boys and girls *upstairs* (or wherever those lush wood paneled or whatever offices are located for the Big Shots) pee in their pants than the possibility of a massive malpractice action involving numerous patients. You've got one, two, three or more patients possibly murdered by one of your employees? By the time a group of high priced attorneys are finished with the place the patients and or their family/estate will own that place.
    Last edit by DoGoodThenGo on Oct 16, '15

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