Hospitals turn to LPN's to fill staffing shortages - page 4

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  1. by   msdobson
    Quote from Tweety
    I'm not understanding this retort. The poster says it all comes down to money.
    My mistake. :imbar Apologies. Completely misread that one!
  2. by   Grammyx6
    Quote from lindarn
    No, I do not work at bedside nursing anymore, and no one is belittiling you. I don't because I have medical issues to deal with. The main reason nurses with BSNs and advanced degrees leave bedside nursing is because we are not rewarded monetarily for our educational efforts. ...
    When I can get that at bedside nursing, I will return to bedside nursing. Maybe someday nurses will all be Independant Contractors, and then nurses with higher degrees will just set their own rates for themeselves, and not have to worry about those who chose not to earn a higher education, and have them set my wages.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington

    Have you forgotten that "there but by the grace of God goes I or my family member?" I chose to work in long-term care because if I can make someones last days, weeks, etc a little nicer, if I can soothe thier pain, If I can make even a very little difference, then I have done what I want to do and what I believe I have been called to do. More money is nice, but I became a nurse to help people.

    I am not saying that nurses in general are paid anything near what we are worth, if the "pencil pushers" were to experience what we truly do every day, or even if the DON's would get out onto the floor (some do, but I haven't seen many), then maybe we would be rewarded as we deserve. Each of us. At our own level of worth.
  3. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Grammyx6
    Have you forgotten that "there but by the grace of God goes I or my family member?" I chose to work in long-term care because if I can make someones last days, weeks, etc a little nicer, if I can soothe thier pain, If I can make even a very little difference, then I have done what I want to do and what I believe I have been called to do. More money is nice, but I became a nurse to help people.

    I am not saying that nurses in general are paid anything near what we are worth, if the "pencil pushers" were to experience what we truly do every day, or even if the DON's would get out onto the floor (some do, but I haven't seen many), then maybe we would be rewarded as we deserve. Each of us. At our own level of worth.
    :spin: :spin: Well said!:spin: :spin:

    I do believe that there is a place for everyone in nursing, from CNAs to doctorates. We need them to comfort the patients, to delegate care, to research as well as to teach new and upcoming nurses. But, to disregard the ones below you is where I have the dilemma while reading some of the flames.
  4. by   bondoson88
    I have been an LVN and I have worked in an acute care hospital for 26 years and I have worked in almost every department. I currently have a position in CCU, although I do get bumped by RN travelers who have contracts to only work in critical care areas.I already knew that would happen even though I don't like it. So I still float throughout the hospital and you wouldn't believe how little RN's out there know. (new grads and ones with only a few years experience) They are always asking me for advice on things and how to do things and I am always showing someone something. I don't mind helping them out. But I know that nursing is more than just getting a big degree. it's a lot of common sense, being aware, listening to the patients and to your own gut feeling, like you feel that something isn't right here and above all it is experience. If you have taken care of so many type X patients then you kind of know what to expect from that type of diagnosis from what has happened previously. It helps you gain knowledge with experience.And from working in critical care areas and with some fantastic critical care RN's it has helped me so much in all other areas I work. The charge nurses on the med/surg and tele floors actually look to me for support/help because they have RN's who do not know what to do .I do plan on getting my RN in the future but just because you happen to have it after your name doesn't mean that you can take better care of a patient. The type of pt's I take care of in the units, most of the RNs on the floors would not know what to do. Everyone always tells me(RNs) that I should be able to challenge the RN boards because I know so much . I would love to be able to challenge the boards and would have done it a long time ago. But I know that there is always other things that I don't know and I pay attention and asks questions and I read a lot.When I don't know something beleive me I ask somebody that does know.One of my supervisors that other day told me that he was telling another supervisor and I was better than most of the RNs working here.So guess what there are stupid LVNs and stupid RNs and smart LVNs and smart RNs. I would rather have a smart LVN take care of me than a stupid RN who hasn't got a clue. Thanks
  5. by   karenna
    Smart move. Some of the best nurses I have ever known were LPN's. If it wasn't for the help I got from a lot of seasoned LPN's I wouldn't know jackshiite.
  6. by   dolldoctor
    In the area I live in, several hospitals are hiring people in off the street, making them CNAs or hospital trained patient care partners and having them work under the RN. Granted, sometimes the ads suggest that a patient care partner be a nursing student, however, they will take anyone and train them and then turn them loose with patient care. The RN of course will have to do the meds, chart and assess and no doubt have her license on the line in the event something happens to the patient either by a doctor mistake or due to unlicensed care providers.

    It does seem that some hospitals are getting away with business practise on the cheap by using this method.
  7. by   arual56
    Quote from LadySugarBug
    Good to see this, as I'll be one in another or two (God willing I pass the boards!) Did a clinical at a doc in a box and one of my fellow students asked a doc why they were hiring only MA's and RN's and no LPN's? He said, and I quote (and PLEASE nobody flame me...I DIDN'T SAY THIS: he said "MA's know very little which makes them useful,,,they follow directions, RN'S know everything and we can count on them, BUT LPN'S know just enough to make them dangerous..." needless to say after we informed our instructor...we're not going there anymore!

    Good for you! Perhaps the doctor would be a little less arrogent if he heard that the only difference between God and a doctor is that God doesn't think he is a doctor. I'm very proud of you for making your stand.:wink2:
  8. by   fakebee
    Bondoson88-Your statement that we wouldn't believe how little new grad or inexperienced RNs know is ridiculous-we all know this because at one time we were all new grads or relatively inexperienced. Lucky for us the nurses with 26 years experience didn't expect us to know what they had learned in the course of a lifetime in a diverse number of clinical settings. They felt (at least in my case) that I could benefit from that experience by teaching and mentoring me in the areas I needed help with. Of course you know more than they do you've been doing it forever, you should know more. Your ranting that floor RNs can't take are of the ICU patients you do is also a bunch of bull- I'm sure that if they were oriented and educated by a good preceptor they could develop the necessary skills just like you did when someone taught you all those years ago. Or did you just magically know everything the first day you went to work? You seem to have forgotten that your skills are the result of years of experience and mentoring from nurses of all levels of education, BSN,ADN, Diploma, or LPN. You have a huge chip on your shoulder and an attitude to match. Your statement that that you'd rather have a smart LPN rather than a stupid RN take care of you is just ignorant-there aren't any stupid nurses-just some who are unmotivated, lazy,burnt out, or uncaring. In my 11 years as a nurse I have never worked with a nurse who didn't have the brainpower to do the job-just a lot who either didn't have the training, experience or more often the desire to do a good job. Formal education whether college, hospital based or vocational barely scrapes the surface of what a nurse has to know and much of it can only be learned through experience and like medicine much of nursing is now so specialized that unless you have been doing it forever in a wide variety of settings you can't be expected to know everything about every form of nursing. Luckily for you you have been doing it for a long time and have a vast array of knowledge. The profession of nursing would be better off if you would share that with everyone regardless of experience or educational background. I firmly believe anyone can teach me something but I really appreciate the ones who can teach me without making me feel stupid in the process. This job has a way of doing that enough by itself. Rant off.
  9. by   msdobson
    Quote from dolldoctor
    In the area I live in, several hospitals are hiring people in off the street, making them CNAs or hospital trained patient care partners and having them work under the RN. Granted, sometimes the ads suggest that a patient care partner be a nursing student, however, they will take anyone and train them and then turn them loose with patient care. The RN of course will have to do the meds, chart and assess and no doubt have her license on the line in the event something happens to the patient either by a doctor mistake or due to unlicensed care providers.

    It does seem that some hospitals are getting away with business practise on the cheap by using this method.
    Can't get away with that in California. CNA's must be licensed by the state before they are allowed to work in ANY health care setting. We used to hire NA's off the street (that's how I began...) but, we had some real issues that were well publicized, causing the state to mandate certification.

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