Hospitals Creating Programs for Nurses to Combat 'Compassion Fatigue' - page 2

Programs for Nurses to Combat "Compassion Fatigue "Bruises and pulled muscles, hope and heartbreak - emotional and physical fatigue have contributed to a profound nurse shortage in hospitals... Read More

  1. Visit  Peri profile page
    2
    Quote from snappy01
    Interesting...hospitals creating programs for nurses to help them combat compassion fatigue...How about lets get ENOUGH staffing so the nurses can do the kind of job they were educated to do and ENOUGH staffing so breaks and lunches can be taken routinely; and lets get enough supplies stocked so the nurses do not have to run around finding what they need to do their job; and lets get enough secretaries to do the phone answering and clerical duties;and let's not forget to give compassion classes to managers, doctors and administrators so they will treat the BEDSIDE NURSES WITH THE RESPECT AND COMPASSION THEY DESERVE TO BE TREATED WITH!
    :yeahthat: HEAR HEAR
    cjmjmom and herring_RN like this.
  2. Visit  leosasha profile page
    0
    I still have compassion but I am definitely fatigued. Does compassion fatigue lead to caregiver burnout. Susanne Gordman discusses this in her book, " Nursing Against the Odds ".
  3. Visit  nerdtonurse? profile page
    3
    We just had another lovely "survey" at work, which I refused to send in, since the "anonymous" survey askes such a specific set of questions they can figure out who's who--like, how long have you been a nurse, what special certifications do you have and when did you get them, what floor/shift do you work, what degrees do you have, and -- here's the kicker -- what was your start date. Barney Fife could figure out who was who with that much data....I'm waiting to get fussed at for not submitting my NUMBERED form, and then I'm going to ask how they could tell if I submitted an "anonymous" survey...

    I'm in a rotten mood, we've got 36 beds that are full, 6 waiting on the books for a bed, and only 1 other nurse and myself are scheduled for tonight (ICU stepdown/tele unit). Our morale is so bad, they can't get anyone to come in, and they aren't hiring travelers/temps to save money. We all got a tongue lashing over the number of falls we had this month, and I'm sure if our NM sees something bout this, we'll get B'd out about our "Compassion deficit"

    The beatings will continue until morale improves....
    Last edit by nerdtonurse? on Oct 7, '08 : Reason: spelling
    cjmjmom, StNeotser, and Valerie Salva like this.
  4. Visit  Valerie Salva profile page
    2
    I once had a nurse manger who put up a "how to combat stress and burn-out" pamphlet in the break room. One of the suggestions was "Give of yourself, and do for others."
    We just all cracked up at that- what did she think we were doing at work?

    Some of my smart ***** co-workers crossed out the suggestions in the article and penciled in their own, such as "Drink to the point of passing out" and "Sleep with multiple strangers." My favorite was "Homicide: The Great Stress Reliever."
    Last edit by sirI on Oct 7, '08 : Reason: typo
    ArwenEvenstar and StNeotser like this.
  5. Visit  captncourageous98 profile page
    0
    I get depressed just reading this stuff! I am an LPN dragging my rear back to school for my RN after about 7yrs. Nursing is all I know! I have been in nursing for 16 years and today is my birthday!Wahoo 35! I feel as if I am worse off than some of my patients. I have taken almost 2 year break except for a few classes now and then. It is crunch time and I am trying to decide what I should do with the rest of my life. I have a chance to study culinary arts but do I dare???? I am not sure if I am ready to wade into the murky abiss quite yet.... I do miss my patients but somewhere along the way I forgot who I was.
    David LPN
  6. Visit  loricatus profile page
    4
    IMHO, maybe what they really mean by 'compassion fatique' is that the management is sick of caring about (having any compassion for) the nursing and ancillary staff.
    weirdRN, nerdtonurse?, herring_RN, and 1 other like this.
  7. Visit  suanna profile page
    3
    I sometimes wonder if my hospital isn't happy to have the senior staff burn out and leave. They are the ones with chronic health problems driving up the sick leave cost and insurance rates, they get top pay scale and have the most vacation hours. Senior nurses also have a better chance of recalling when the health care system was in better shape and gripe about the lack of resources available now- that brings everyones expectations up. I honestly don't feel in todays market, many hospitals see QUIALITY nursing care as an asset they can't live without. Adequate or minimal to meet JCAHO standards of care is all they can strive for. More nursing care than that, including experienced staff, is something they can't afford.
    weirdRN, janhetherington, and cjmjmom like this.
  8. Visit  sandyrae profile page
    0
    Our administration does. We recently implemented a EMR which has caused havoc on our care delivery. It was probably broke before but after implementation it truly highlighted how broken it was. Our CNO has convened a group of staff nurses to look at our care delivery and redesign it. I read many posts that speak very negatively about nursing administration etc., however not all nursing admin. are as described. I am a director of nursing and I get frustrated because I want the nurses I represent to be involved and part of the solution instead of simply complaining all the time. It seems many are more comfortable complaining than helping to take the responsibility of improving our profession. It is going to take a professional team to do this.....
  9. Visit  herring_RN profile page
    2
    Quote from sandyrae
    Our administration does. We recently implemented a EMR which has caused havoc on our care delivery. It was probably broke before but after implementation it truly highlighted how broken it was. Our CNO has convened a group of staff nurses to look at our care delivery and redesign it. I read many posts that speak very negatively about nursing administration etc., however not all nursing admin. are as described. I am a director of nursing and I get frustrated because I want the nurses I represent to be involved and part of the solution instead of simply complaining all the time. It seems many are more comfortable complaining than helping to take the responsibility of improving our profession. It is going to take a professional team to do this.....
    Do you direct in an acute care hospital?

    Are you able to implement safe staffing levels? Break relief nurses?Nurses cannot be expected to go do a puzzle while patients are not being cared for.
    janhetherington and RN1982 like this.
  10. Visit  sandyrae profile page
    2
    Quote from herring_RN
    Do you direct in an acute care hospital?

    Are you able to implement safe staffing levels? Break relief nurses?Nurses cannot be expected to go do a puzzle while patients are not being cared for.
    Yes I do. I am director for critical care and emergency serives. We do have staffing grids as most places do, however my departments understand that safety trumps numbers. I trust their judgement to utilize the staff they need to provide safe care. Are we able to have perfect staffing all the time, of course not but it is not because of some higher administrative body saying we can't staff a certain way. We all know about late call outs, etc. It is a high priority for me that nurses have their time to get away from the care enviroment to take time for themselves. That is the only way they will be able to take good care of their patients. I do take offense to the many posts that make it sound like once someone enters a nursing adminstration position they are deemed the enemy. I entered because I felt we needed strong advocates for nurses, but it is like anything else, how long to you expect someone to keep fighting for us when they feel half the time they are fighting each other. I expect us all to act as professionals, especially if we expect other disciplines to treat us that as professionals.
    janhetherington and TopazLover like this.
  11. Visit  leosasha profile page
    0
    The, " us against mentallity" mode is alive and well. I spoke out against this while in nursing school. Things were such a mess that a meeting of all student body and staff was convened. I could see clearly it happening and knew it would worsen unless adressed. I am pleased that a member of management is expressing frustration with current circumstance. Perhaps the administration where you work has seen the light and is willing to attempt to staff adequately but this is not the norm. The vast majority of administration and management prefer to remain members of the, "mushroom club ", And they sit and wonder why they are so resented and why staff nurses will not respond to them.
  12. Visit  nerdtonurse? profile page
    1
    I'll give you an example of what frustrates me to no end.

    Scenario: Night shift, tele/ICU stepdown unit, 36 beds
    A safe n/p ratio: 4 patients per nurse (we get a LOT of pts because "ICU doesn't have another nurse," not because they actually NEED to be on our floor, so we usually have really high acuity)
    Average n/p ratio: 7 patients per nurse
    a safe CNA/P ratio: 1 per 10 pt
    average: 1 for all 36

    How does this actually play out? I've been a nurse about a year. Last time I worked, there were 4 nurses for 36 beds, and no CNA at all. My charge had been a nurse about 6 months, the other RN only had 18 months as a nurse, and the 4th nurse was 2 months off of orientation. My charge and the newbie have never worked a code. I've worked a bunch (mainly because I don't run in the other direction when the code goes off, but I digress).

    I went thru the whole shift with a knot in my stomach, and going over the ACLS protocols in my head, because if we'd had a code, I was the only ACLS certified person on shift.

    During our shift, we had one person have an MI, and a second had a CVA -- but we had to hold them on our floor until another ICU nurse could drive in... We had one DNR pass. A third of the pts on shift were total cares, q2h turns, we had 10 (10!) PEGs. We had 5 colostomies, including one dementia pt who's family flatly refused to allow her to be in restraints, and she was pulling her colostomy off and fingerpainting herself with the contents 3 times on the shift. We had one person with a BMI of 56 who took everyone on the floor to turn. We had 4 people going thru the DT's. Everyone's meds were late, everyone's turns were late, and we were supposed to give all the totals baths (they got a bath if they were dirty, that's all we had time for).

    Dayshift came in, and we were exhausted, trying to fly around and do the 7 am med pass before dayshift takes over at 0730. Did we get an "atta girl" -- of course not. Our NM B'd us out because the station "didn't look tidy" ...

    Bite me.
    ArwenEvenstar likes this.
  13. Visit  RN1982 profile page
    1
    Quote from nerdtonurse?
    I'll give you an example of what frustrates me to no end.

    Scenario: Night shift, tele/ICU stepdown unit, 36 beds
    A safe n/p ratio: 4 patients per nurse (we get a LOT of pts because "ICU doesn't have another nurse," not because they actually NEED to be on our floor, so we usually have really high acuity)
    Average n/p ratio: 7 patients per nurse
    a safe CNA/P ratio: 1 per 10 pt
    average: 1 for all 36

    How does this actually play out? I've been a nurse about a year. Last time I worked, there were 4 nurses for 36 beds, and no CNA at all. My charge had been a nurse about 6 months, the other RN only had 18 months as a nurse, and the 4th nurse was 2 months off of orientation. My charge and the newbie have never worked a code. I've worked a bunch (mainly because I don't run in the other direction when the code goes off, but I digress).

    I went thru the whole shift with a knot in my stomach, and going over the ACLS protocols in my head, because if we'd had a code, I was the only ACLS certified person on shift.

    During our shift, we had one person have an MI, and a second had a CVA -- but we had to hold them on our floor until another ICU nurse could drive in... We had one DNR pass. A third of the pts on shift were total cares, q2h turns, we had 10 (10!) PEGs. We had 5 colostomies, including one dementia pt who's family flatly refused to allow her to be in restraints, and she was pulling her colostomy off and fingerpainting herself with the contents 3 times on the shift. We had one person with a BMI of 56 who took everyone on the floor to turn. We had 4 people going thru the DT's. Everyone's meds were late, everyone's turns were late, and we were supposed to give all the totals baths (they got a bath if they were dirty, that's all we had time for).

    Dayshift came in, and we were exhausted, trying to fly around and do the 7 am med pass before dayshift takes over at 0730. Did we get an "atta girl" -- of course not. Our NM B'd us out because the station "didn't look tidy" ...

    Bite me.

    I would have told her to bite me. At my former job, which was my contingent job, which is now permanantly my former job, I worked on a critical care stepdown, n/p 4:1 when the acuity of the patients were ICU-like. One night we had 5 nurses for 24 patients, no clerk, one CNA. Our sister unit had the same staffing. So we were suppose to rely on the one ICU clerk that night. Where was the assistant nurse manager? In the office and she said and I quote "I have my own work to do". Kiss my fat a$$ is what I wanted to say to her
    nerdtonurse? likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top
close
close