Hospitals claim natural births following C-sections too ri$ky - page 2

Hospitals claim natural births following C-sections too ri$ky By Kay Lazar Friday, May 14, 2004 Citing the rising costs of malpractice lawsuits, a major hospital chain serving Southeastern... Read More

  1. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    A few years ago, I read an article on a study about the reasons for C.S. The study concluded that the number one reason why C/S is performed is "physician convenience."
  2. by   julieftRN
    I had a VBAC 17 months after my first child. That was the most horrific experience of my life. The baby was bigger than the first (which didnt even budge with the vacum ext) and got stuck. I labored way longer than I should have, BP dropped drastically where they turned me upside down, and baby had aa hard time getting started when he finally came out after a Doc came and practically jumped on my stomach. I will never forget that birthing experience. I believe the Doc should have called for another c/s, especially after it got that bad!:angryfire
  3. by   nekhismom
    There are bad stories both ways. I just think it should be an option. I TOTALLY understand if there is no staffing, but routine???? I THINK NOT!!! :angryfire:

    Pts. here don't get a chance. Docs are quick to cut, and it all boils down to $$$, and convenience. Plain and simple.
  4. by   BabyRN2Be
    Methinks the head OB doc has the ear of the administration in this case. If a mom wants to try for a VBAC, it should be an option for her. She should not have someone make that choice for her, it should be her own. If she wants to have a c/s for her own convenience, that's one thing, but taken the choice away from everyone is another.

    BTW, Brigham-Women's Hospital in Boston is wonderful. I was with my cousin when she had her baby there, and they were absolutely awesome! They could have decided that she needed a c/s because her baby had a birth defect, but no! They insisted that she have a vag delivery... they were absolutely awesome and she was very grateful that they wanted her to have a vag delivery.
  5. by   BeachNurse
    Quote from nekhismom
    There are bad stories both ways. I just think it should be an option. I TOTALLY understand if there is no staffing, but routine???? I THINK NOT!!! :angryfire:

    Pts. here don't get a chance. Docs are quick to cut, and it all boils down to $$$, and convenience. Plain and simple.

    The above is what I believe happened to me..this is a large, very popular hospital for delivering babies-in a large city. I think it was for for convenience and $$$ purposes since I can't imagine that they wouldn't have the staff.
  6. by   NurseKratchet
    My dr was excellent I had two previous C/S and was a high risk pregnancy all 3 times but the last time I had a VBAC and the difference in recovery was remarkable so I say if you have had a previous C/S or two then during pre-natal care this should be addressed so you know whether that is an option for you or not if you don't like the answer then it is your right to find another dr IMHO...............
  7. by   jwk
    I think it's great that all the nurses on this thread are advocating for their patients. That's what all of us are supposed to do.

    That being said, I'm amazed that many of you don't see the liability problems accompanying VBAC's. Thank the attorneys for this - it's not the OB's fault. The statute of limitations for delivery-related problems is 21 years, not the usual 2 or 3 years. We have attorneys advertising that if your child has any kind of learning disability, it could have been due to a problem at delivery and that you can sue and recover damages.

    My hospital does 17,000 deliveries a year. Our VBAC rate is a fraction of what it used to be.

    The incidence of uterine rupture during VBAC is very low - but it is still many times higher than a non-surgically scarred uterus. That simple fact will virtually guarantee a lawsuit will be filed if a woman ruptures her uterus during a VBAC and something happens to the child. The attorneys will be lining up outside her door with business cards in hand.

    As with so many things in medicine, much of what we do is "CYA-oriented". It shouldn't have to be that way, but without tort reform and some limits on the ridiculous number of frivolous nuisance lawsuits being filed, this problem is not going to go away.
  8. by   julieftRN
    Just remember that some of these lawsuits are not unjust. I have not filed any lawsuits but I could. Im not the "lawsuit" type but I know in my situation it was very difficult for me and my child, and yes, he now has a learning disability. You should take into consideration the suffering of the patient and the effects that it will present for the child and its family in the long run, and sometimes not dwell on the whole lawsuit thing. If it is just, then it shouldnt be batted down. I know I would never do VBAC again. HORRIBLE, HORRIBLE experience.:angryfire I'd rather suffer for a few days than to have my child suffer a lifetime.
  9. by   hock1
    [QUOTE=fiestynurse]This isn't about liability, this is about reimbursement for the delivery. They get reimbursed the same amount for a high risk vaginal delivery, as they do for a low risk vaginal delivery. It's more cost effective just to cut her open!

    Maybe it's about liability and reimbursement. From personal experience: every doc I spoke down the yellow pages expressed concerns about liability, every doc wanted a $25,000 to $35,000 cash deposit before they'd accept my case (I was unisured and didn't quality for assistance). Good point, Fiestynurse

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