Hospital turning back clock a bit on nurses' uniforms - The State

  1. hospital turning back clock a bit on nurses’ uniforms
    [color=#6f6f6f]the state, sc - 19 hours ago
    ... ago, when almost all nurses were easily identifiable by standardized uniforms,” said sandy summers, executive director of the center for nursing advocacy, a ...

    starting jan. 1, nurse april kobishop can forget about wearing her pink top with black piping and a little black bow to work.

    the 24-year-old nurse at hilton head regional medical center’s coronary care unit will have to trade in her wardrobe of bright-colored scrubs for solid sage, navy or white uniforms, as mandated by the hospital’s new dress code.

    “instead of buying a bunch of gifts, i’m going christmas shopping for new scrubs,” kobishop said last week. “but it’s not a burden. i actually think it will help everyone feel like they’re part of the same team.”

    like a growing number of hospitals across the country, hilton head regional is tightening its wardrobe policy for some employees, including the entire nursing staff, nursing assistants and unit secretaries

    more... hospital turning back clock a bit on nurses’ uniforms - the state
    Last edit by brian on Dec 6, '06
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  2. 83 Comments

  3. by   aquaphoneRN
    Hi, male RN here. No way I'm wearing white pants. Not going to happen. Period.

    Where I used to work there was a male nurse who didn't wear scrubs to work at all. Honestly though, he dressed in a very professionally, tasteful, stylish way, just not a traditional "nursing" way. The was nothing offensive or sloppy about it though.

    One day someone in management said "You're not wearing scrubs . . ." before they could finish he interupted them with "Yeah, I look good, don't I!" End of conversation.
  4. by   BSNtobe2009
    Quote from aquaphoneRN
    Hi, male RN here. No way I'm wearing white pants. Not going to happen. Period.

    Where I used to work there was a male nurse who didn't wear scrubs to work at all. Honestly though, he dressed in a very professionally, tasteful, stylish way, just not a traditional "nursing" way. The was nothing offensive or sloppy about it though.

    One day someone in management said "You're not wearing scrubs . . ." before they could finish he interupted them with "Yeah, I look good, don't I!" End of conversation.
    You would actually quit a job over a uniform issue?
  5. by   SuesquatchRN
    I wear white. Choice. My residents and their families love it. For one thing, they can identify me easily. More importantly, the elderly have an iconic imprint of the nurse in their heads, and my dressing the way they expect a nurse to look (barring a little white cap) shows them that I respect them.

    Besides, I'm really proud of what I do and don't mind at all being identifiable.
  6. by   savedbutterfly
    I don't mind the different parts of the healthcare team wearing a different color of uniform, I think that it is a good idea. But there should be a key up in the patient's room (ie. red=x-ray, blue=RN).
  7. by   wjf00
    I would wear anything my employer prescribes. So long as they buy the scrubs. Obviously, I believe in professional dress and grooming. But if my employer wants to get into specifics, they can do the laundry.
  8. by   Gromit
    Quote from BSNtobe2009
    You would actually quit a job over a uniform issue?
    Depends on the degree of the issue -but if we're talking extremes, than YES, I would. Also a Male RN here. I'm not wearing white pants either. Not a chance. Did it in nursing school -after a while, the whites get dingy gray or an off yellow (I guess that depends on water quality -which is pretty poor in my area- and the amount and type of detergent -and bleach- you use). Scrubs are very durable, not so expensive that you don't mind chucking 'em if they get nasty or worn, and easy to care for.
    I agree with the other poster -the hospital is free to provide the uniform if they want a strict standard. There are plenty of other facilities to choose from, if the current one decides to get too drastic. With all of the problems that exist in our field, this one should rate pretty low on the scale, I'd think. Retention is a major issue -and I don't see this as helping THAT. Our facility leaves most of this up to the managers of their floors, though. Mine is pretty lenient -so long as its tasteful. But some require blue, or brown, etc. I have no real problem with that, however. But white? Bad plan. I'm not wearing a skirt, either
  9. by   RGN1
    Over here it's normal for nurses to wear a uniform standardised by the hospital & paid for by the hospital (although a deposit is often required these days of around $45). Many hospitals also have colour code charts on the walls of the ward so patients know who is who. Some hospitals even launder the uniforms too. If not you can claim tax back on washing them at home.

    I think it's great, we look smart & everyone knows who we are & what we do. My uniform is a palish blue with white piping. the trousers to the tunic (there is a dress or tunic option - I have a both) are navy blue. the sisters wear navy with white piping (sisters are ward managers/charge nurses). The male nurses wear a white top with the pale blue lapels & navy trousers - we have no male charge but I guess if we did he'd wear either a navy top or navy lapels. The Healthcare assistants (CNA's roughly) wear a blue & white stripe with navy trousers (if with a tunic), cleaners wear lilac, radiographers black pinstripe (that's new & I think it looks dreadful!) Theatre staff all wear green scrubs.

    It's going to take me a while to get used to having to buy my own stuff in the USA & to work out who is who! Just one of the multitude of culture shocks I know I'm in for!!
  10. by   Katnip
    The biggest problem is there's no professinal standard.

    Hospital A could have their nurses in navy while hospital B uses burgundy. Plus few hospitals enforce the regulations and people often just start wearing what they want. I've seen that happen and housekeeping will decide they want to wear what the nurses are wearing. Or radiology will say they also prefer navy or whatever color the nurse is wearing.

    I'm not a proponent of going back to white.

    I don't think this is a problem that's going to be solved. Too many nurses like to do their own thing as far as what they wear to work to set a national standard.
  11. by   Lorie P.
    at the hospital where i work it is ceil blue for nursing staff, kaki for tech/cna's, royal for ed, and burgundy for xray. of course most patients seem to think anyone that wears scrubs is a nurse.
    i usually wear all white and yes even a skirt, most of my patients compliment me on wearing white saying that they know it is the nurse who comes in.
    not too long ago while working prn at a small rual hospital, i went to work with a white skirt, white scrub top trimmed with lace at the sleeves, white hose and white nursing shoes. you would not belive all the copliments i received, i had one patient tell me" finially a professional nurse around here!"
    i understand that not everyone is always going to agree on what color we should wear, but it is not worth losing sleep over.
  12. by   Gromit
    I've never seen a facility that allowed its cleaning staff to wear scrubs.
    I'd have to believe that they would be rare, certainly not the 'norm'.
    I will say that I truly enjoy the allowance for individuality (of course, so long as its not overboard) -we work a long hard job, its kind of nice to at least be comfortable. But I wouldn't put up much of a fight so long as they don't get it in their heads to make us wear white. White is just too easily stained -and they begin to look 'old' very quickly.
  13. by   aquaphoneRN
    Quote from BSNtobe2009
    You would actually quit a job over a uniform issue?
    No, I wouldn't. I might refuse to comply though. Here in NYC no one seems to care what you wear, even if it's bordering on unprofessional.

    I always wear nice scrub tops, EMT/Paramedic pants with all the pockets to hold my gear, a pair of crocs, and my ID badge.

    No one has ever said anything to me about my standard of dress. I take pride in my appearance.
  14. by   slooje
    If there are going to be dress codes, shouldnt it apply to all staff, doctors, management included? Only applying dress codes to nurses, x-ray, cna's, etc. is grouping highly educated nurses with nursing support staff while contributing to the stereotypes that doctors are the only professional, educated hospital workers. I am definitely not saying that the support staff is beneath nurses, they arent, but they are "support staff" and generally dont have the education or professional attitudes that most nurses have. If we want to be treated as professionals and get the respect and pay we deserve, we need to start acting like professionals. We shouldnt have to have someone tell us what to wear, we should take the bull by the horns and do it ourselves.

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