Hospital turning back clock a bit on nurses' uniforms - The State - page 6

hospital turning back clock a bit on nurses’ uniforms the state, sc - 19 hours ago ... ago, when almost all nurses were easily identifiable by standardized uniforms,” said sandy summers, executive... Read More

  1. by   Brad_RN_Student_PA
    Quote from BSNtobe2009
    You would actually quit a job over a uniform issue?
    I could and WOULD. Period. And I am not attending the feminine "pinning ceromony" because we are MANDATED to wear our girlish white uniforms...the very same ones we wore to change dressings in wounds filled with MRSA and change poopy diapers. Yes...i could, and I WOULD. Nursing needs to change with the times man...

    BUT on the same note, I will say that it would be very helpful for patients and employees both, for all equal employees, be it divided by team, unit, speciality, what have you, to be wearing the same color at least. Hopefully not white on white! But seriously, would help tell apart a CNA from an RN from a Doc, from housekeeping.
  2. by   Brad_RN_Student_PA
    Quote from nurse hobbit
    at the hospital where i work it is ceil blue for nursing staff, kaki for tech/cna's, royal for ed, and burgundy for xray. of course most patients seem to think anyone that wears scrubs is a nurse.
    i usually wear all white and yes even a skirt, most of my patients compliment me on wearing white saying that they know it is the nurse who comes in.
    not too long ago while working prn at a small rual hospital, i went to work with a white skirt, white scrub top trimmed with lace at the sleeves, white hose and white nursing shoes. you would not belive all the copliments i received, i had one patient tell me" finially a professional nurse around here!"
    i understand that not everyone is always going to agree on what color we should wear, but it is not worth losing sleep over.
    no offense, but no way i'm wearing a skirt. and just because i don't, doesn't mean i'm not professional. ('course i'm a male) and really...be real...cna or rn, you are very active in your job, changing briefs, turning people, chasing down confused patients....who in his or her right mind is gonna wear nice clothing *(ie nice khakies and a button up shirt) or a skirt? no offense to you, but this is 2007. it's not comfy, and nurses and nurses aids alike do a lot of manual labor...we should be at least somewhat comfortable. and i'm probably gonna offend you by this, but if you can do your job in a skirt, you probably aren't doing it right. again, no offense, but it's just not realistic. lots of mobility needed. thanks.
  3. by   RNSC
    The title of the thread says it all "Hospital turning back the clock a bit on nurses' uniforms'"
    After all the strides nursing has made in professionalism and in education, we are still fighting this battle. I don't understand. Doctors, Lawyers heck even Teachers don't fight this battle. It feels like a throw back to the pink collar ghetto ( a 70s term) we have struggled to climb out of.
    Maybe patients and others people don't recognize us because we don't dress with pride and professionalism.
    I'm told its a security issue. But at another hospital in the area, a woman let the "nurse" dressed in purple scrubs (the uniform of the hospital for nurses) take her baby even though she had never seen her before. Fortunately the nurse was a friend of mine and made the woman look at her and her badge. And put the fear of God into her about never letting your baby go with someone you don't know.
    I'm sorry this is turning into a rant but its seems to me that some the younger nurses are missing the point. The uniform issue is more about the professonal/emotional/ soul/core of nursing. Are we a job with uniforms and timeclocks or are we a profession with pride in our careers and care for our patients? Do we let the administrators set the boundaries of our job or do we control our profession?
  4. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from nurse hobbit
    i usually wear all white and yes even a skirt, most of my patients compliment me on wearing white saying that they know it is the nurse who comes in.
    not too long ago while working prn at a small rual hospital, i went to work with a white skirt, white scrub top trimmed with lace at the sleeves, white hose and white nursing shoes. you would not belive all the copliments i received, i had one patient tell me" finially a professional nurse around here!"
    and this would have been an excellent teaching opportunity; just because someone comes to work kitted out in all white does not mean he/she is a "professional" nurse. appearances can be deceiving; how many times have we heard about babies being snatched by someone who "looked like a nurse?"

    if wearing all white makes you happy, that's great. but many of us get plenty of compliments from tasteful colored/print scrubs as well, and i doubt that any of us feel we are less professional
    Last edit by PANurseRN1 on Mar 15, '07
  5. by   Gromit
    No way would I buy the "security issue" bs -its just a bogus justification. BADGES are for security issues. A uniform can be purchased online, or at pretty much any uniform-type store (we have several in the Tampa area that I can think of off the top of my head). Any idiot can dress like someone they aren't. BADGES are a little harder to come by -especially the ones like we have (has imbedded images and watermarks, and imbeded circuitry for access into restricted areas etc) -they are distinctive.
  6. by   TDub
    I wish we went back to caps. I loved wearing my cap!
  7. by   jjjoy
    Quote from Gromit
    No way would I buy the "security issue" bs -its just a bogus justification. BADGES are for security issues. A uniform can be purchased online, or at pretty much any uniform-type store (we have several in the Tampa area that I can think of off the top of my head). Any idiot can dress like someone they aren't. BADGES are a little harder to come by -especially the ones like we have (has imbedded images and watermarks, and imbeded circuitry for access into restricted areas etc) -they are distinctive.
    Using the same argement then, if badges are all that's important then, why not let housekeeping and other non-nursing staff wear scrubs?

    I don't think it's strictly security. But distinctive uniforms makes it easier to identify who is who (or what role anyway) at a glance. Even if patients never figure it out, within the facility, the staff can better identify who is in what role. Security uniforms and police uniforms aren't that hard to come by or to mimic, but that doesn't mean that security guards and police officers should insist on wearing whatever they deam most comfortable.
    Last edit by jjjoy on Mar 16, '07
  8. by   Gromit
    I have no care at all about what others wear. But the 'its for security' reasons are totally bogus precisely for the very reasons I listed. You can get any color scrub just about anywhere -including online. BADGES are for security, and that works nicely.
    As for your other points, they are entirely a matter of the perspective people have. People EXPECT their law-enforcement or security types to dress in a uniform that looks a certain way -and in THEIR cases, its far more than just 'convenience'. When the poop hits the fan, you want to be able to (in a disaster, or dangerous situation) identify "your people" (friend from foe) in a hurry -their uniforms greatly aid in that (when I worked in fire/rescue, there was absolutely NO danger of my accidentally asking 'joe on the street' for something when I needed another EMS person). Security want to be able to identify friend from foe in a hurry as well -no danger of them dressing like 'us' or anyone else. At a glance, they know who they are.
    I'm not going to argue the pros and cons of nurses wearing some esoteric uniform -thats really more a matter of personal taste. But I won't buy the "security" reason because unless you have a uniform that is not easily duplicated (or purchased pretty much anywhere by the general public) then it just won't fly.
  9. by   janetjanetbobanet
    Quote from bubby8
    I do notice something. The days I do decide to wear all white. The patients love it. I always receive many compliments on how professional I look. I also have been told on numerous occassions, by elderly pts, that it was this way years ago in the nursing community. I don't have a problem with wearing white, but not all the time. The biggest problem I have is it seems as though a lot of nurses do not iron thier scrubs. Some nurses look like they wore thier scrubs to bed. Whatever happened to looking professional. We are professionals! We should look the part as well as act the part!
    Iron scrubs?
  10. by   TDub
    Oh, yeah! I iron my scrubs on the "hotter 'n' hell" setting right before dressing and drive to work in a long duster (that I've also ironed) to keep germs off. I wear the duster to the cafeteria, too. I look like a nut, but I know I'm as clean as I can get.
  11. by   sanctuary
    Remember when only RNs had a cap c a black stripe, LVNs had a grey stripe and students had no stripe or (seniors) had a half stripe? Now that's organization for ya. Never had to worry about asking the maid for a glass of water, or the RN to open the drapes. And we always ironed our unies, never wore them more than once, and had to wear white nylons. As a Psychiatric Technition in Calif in the 60s, we wore whites, had a cap (green stripe) and white nylons. Once, following a clinical day as a student nurse, I forgot to bring white nylons, and wore the tan that I'd had on as a student. My nursing supervisor mentioned something about having a waitress in the office. Old eagle eyes, never let us get away c nuttin'.
  12. by   Nurse Beth
    Can you tell me more about the title badge? Is it affixed to the smaller time/name badge? If so, how- can't picture it.
    Is it cumbersome?
  13. by   mshellfinch
    Quote from hawkesbe
    Can you tell me more about the title badge? Is it affixed to the smaller time/name badge? If so, how- can't picture it.
    Is it cumbersome?
    The title badge is just a circular piece of plastic with a colored sticker on it, navy blue with white letter for RN, light blue with white for LPNs turqoise with white letters for the PCTs (patient care tech -cna's with training to remove foleys and ivs, and take blood sugars) and maroon with white lettering for the CNAs. The circle fits over the clip that clips the actual name badge onto our uniforms. It makes the nursing staff very identifiable to the rest of the hospital. I have found it quite helpful myself on many occasions. I hope that helps you get a visual of the badge.

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