Hospital turning back clock a bit on nurses' uniforms - The State - page 5

hospital turning back clock a bit on nurses’ uniforms the state, sc - 19 hours ago ... ago, when almost all nurses were easily identifiable by standardized uniforms,” said sandy summers, executive... Read More

  1. by   CRNI-ICU20
    As I said to one clip board carrier: "I am sure you mean well....but my patient isn't concerned with the color of my uniform....my patient is concerned whether or not I bring her her pain medications in a timely fashion, whether or not her skin is intact because I am turning her frequently, whether or not her IV lines and sites are cared for and intact, and whether or not I am in tune with her enought to know when to call the Doctor if there are adverse or troubling changes....you don't pay me to look like a Stepford Nurse....you pay me to take excellent care of my patients....and that is what I am doing"......
    She said no more.
    Our place wants us to wear WHITE LAB COATS with royal blue pants....no print tops....they think this looks more professional....
    No one stopped to think that a white lab coat covered in bile, feces, or spattered blood, which is often a reality in ICU despite barrier clothing does not scream professional....it screams for bleach! duh!
    I think as nurses, we have the capability to dress ourselves....for crying out loud we learned to tie our shoes at kindergarten age....
    WE ARE EDUCATED PEOPLE....do you suppose some of the management and bean counters out there could start seeing us as such? WE don't tell them what to wear....we don't say, "gee, that skirt you have on is too tight for your big butt....would you mind changing it?" WE don't tell the CEO that his tie looks like a test pattern for an off air tv station....criminey people....
    When are we going to quit rolling over for stupid stuff like this that has NOTHING TO DO WITH OUR MINDS, SOULS, HEARTS, AND SKILLS??? When our patient is going through a breach birth, does she give a rat's patoot whether or not our uniform is white or blue?? Does she care whether we look like the other nurse next to us? When I have a patient crashing, who need intubation....or is going into cardiogenic shock, is that the last thing on their mind...."gee, I wish my nurse would wear a white lab coat, because she/he looks so much more professional?"
    The color coding for nurses vs. aides/technicians is over done, and over wrought.....we wear name tags....we introduce ourselves to our patients...
    and for the most part, in my neck of the woods, my patients are usually in a drug induced coma....they have no idea what color of clothes I am wearing or if I am wearing clothes at all!! PLUEEEZE!
    Stop giving away these icons of personal identity to people who don't even know what it is to walk in your shoes....
    When you first get hired...you become "an employee number"....you get a name tag with your name on it....sometimes a picture....and the area where you work....
    When you log in computers...you are a number....
    when you sign up for a class or a mandatory meeting...you are a number...
    Wouldn't it be nice if corporate could see us as PEOPLE????
  2. by   lightgreen13
    Back to white = Bad idea!

    There is actually research that reveals that patients like to have colorful walls as opposed to the traditional all white walls. Even worse in an unstylish uniform!

    White is symbolic. Partial white is okay (purity, cleanliness), but all white = Sterile! It is taking away power from a historically repressed profession. NO WONDER ADMINISTRATION WOULD LIKE THIS IDEA!!!!

    I'd love for hospitals to actually try to require that MDs do the same...like that would go over well!

    There are always nurses at the rn station that talk about their days in white, but I never see them show up in white when they have the chance! Their uniforms had to be starched...WHO CARES! GO BUY YOURSELF A TROPHY OR A MEDAL THAT YOU CAN WEAR TO WORK EVERYDAY! Maybe because it would be too embarrassing.

    You can argue that white will keep nurses from laying down on the floor or something silly like that, but by the same notion would it keep nurses from handling patients that just vomited or had a BM?

    Okay, just a quick rant! Until the next brilliant administration idea that didn't come from anyone working on the floor!
  3. by   RN2B78
    wow its good to see a lot of people are interested in this topic! now its time for my two cents....right now I am in nursing school and work as a aide at a long term care facility...they have chosen burgandy for us....the only thing I can say about it is that it is very depressing...I wish they could have chosen a color that was more suitibule and more unisex...other than that I feel it is a good thing for the patients to be able to identify who has what role....as we all know there ae so many that choose not to wear their name tags as a way to be identified.
  4. by   bluiis923
    In our hospital, EVERYONE (including housekeeping) wears scrubs. But there is a little trend that I've noticed lately amoung some of the new younger nurses. They have started wearing layered tight shirts with scrub pants. Very form fitting with long sleeves that come down about halfway over the hands. You know the style now. I think that look is great with jeans but not appropriate for a clinical situation. I keep thinking that the mgr will say something about it but nothing has been said yet. The students are all taking note so we'll see what happens......
  5. by   bluiis923
    At our facility, you must wear your badge on the chest area as well. All names and units, duty, etc are in black except the RN which is in large RED letters. This pretty much clearly ID's the nurse and the pts seem to like it.
  6. by   Gromit
    as with our area. You wear your namebadge on the chest. It says who you are, and WHAT you are.
    Any patients who feel good enough to worry about the color of my scrubs are feeling well enough to be home (or wherever they came from).
  7. by   RN Zeke
    It isn't the color of the uniform/scrubs that makes the nurse. It is how the nurse presents onself, verbally and nonverbally. I'm with not wearing white. White can be seen through like a cheap newspaper in most instances. I feel if I am standing in my uwnderwear, even with all the appropriate undergarments on. Then I am so warm, miserable, and droopy. Yes I would change jobs if wearing white was a requirement. I can be more professional in scrubs that don't show every flaw or spot on them.
    My two cents worth.
    Cay
  8. by   jjjoy
    Many people automatically say "White is horrible" - this thread isn't about nurses wearing white

    Many people automatically say "My skills are more important than what I wear" - I don't think anyone is arguing that certain clothes will automatically a person more "professional." However, depending on what a person is wearing, they may LOOK more professional. For example, I expect a lawyer to wear a suit to a business meeting. That certainly doesn't make him a better lawyer!

    Many people automatically say "An introduction and name badge ought to be enough" - maybe it ought to be, but it's clearly not for some people, otherwise you wouldn't hear so many say they don't know who's who in a hospital setting.

    Many people say "If a patient is well enough to figure out our coloring system, they are well enough to go home" - it's true that many patients will never get who is who and who does what, but others will. And color-coding/uniforms aren't just for patients, it can also be for other staff to more easily recognize each other. Of course, there are still many debates over what exactly would be the dress requirements for different roles.

    Many people automatically say "Doctors aren't told what to wear" - true. Most doctors aren't employed by the hospitals and they spend half their day in an office setting consulting, thus they dress accordingly (dress shirts and ties, nice blouse and slacks). God forbid floor nurses wearing dress shoes while walking up and down the hallways all day or night!
  9. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from lightgreen13
    Back to white = Bad idea!

    There is actually research that reveals that patients like to have colorful walls as opposed to the traditional all white walls. Even worse in an unstylish uniform!

    White is symbolic. Partial white is okay (purity, cleanliness), but all white = Sterile! It is taking away power from a historically repressed profession. NO WONDER ADMINISTRATION WOULD LIKE THIS IDEA!!!!

    I’d love for hospitals to actually try to require that MDs do the same…like that would go over well!

    There are always nurses at the rn station that talk about their days in white, but I never see them show up in white when they have the chance! Their uniforms had to be starched…WHO CARES! GO BUY YOURSELF A TROPHY OR A MEDAL THAT YOU CAN WEAR TO WORK EVERYDAY! Maybe because it would be too embarrassing.

    You can argue that white will keep nurses from laying down on the floor or something silly like that, but by the same notion would it keep nurses from handling patients that just vomited or had a BM?

    Okay, just a quick rant! Until the next brilliant administration idea that didn’t come from anyone working on the floor!
    There is really no reason to be rude about the experienced nurses who happen to be talking about what things were like "back in the day." As a student, you certainly could learn something from them. When you are older and have actually been a nurse for many years, you will probably talk about what things were like in your earlier professional years, too. I hope for your sake people won't be as sarcastic and dismissive of you.
  10. by   lupin
    You know what? I am employed by a hospital, not the marine corps. I like my scrubs with flowers and frogs and lizards and yes, even Scooby Doo on them. I am a nurse and I am an individual and I feel that cramming me into an uncomfortable dress uniform that went out of practicality three decades ago or telling me that I can only wear one color of scrubs takes away that sense of individualism. Do we not have enough problems as nurses?
    I don't dress disrespectfully. My hair and clothes are neat and clean. I don't wear a lot of jewelry. And I get a lot of compliments on my scrubs. Many pts have said they like seeing a nurse that wears colored scrubs because it looks less formidable. White has also been shown to increase aggitation in psych and geriatric pts. No one tells housekeepers that they must wear the old "maid" uniforms or teachers that they must dress like the old schoolmarms from the 1800's.
    Sorry guys but this subject really gets my goat for some reason. I don't think an individual who dresses appropriately and within dress code specifics should have that taken away because of some old antiquaited idea of what a profession should "look" like. And IMHO, the people who have time to spend on making these policies and enforcing them are people who haven't been involved in pt care since the iron lung came out. I also don't see theses people making a fund for nurses to buy their uniforms or to get them repaired/cleaned after a week's work. Maybe if they spent more time out on the floors or did more to recruit more nurses to adequately staff the units then maybe they'd see what a nurse looks like nowadays. Vent over:typing .
  11. by   mary78910
    Where i work (OB) we all have to wear burgandy scrubs, med surg etc is allowed to wear any kind they want etc. I don't mind wearing all the same color, safety issues of course, i woudl hate to have to go back to white lol. But where my sister works her hospital gives them 75.00 a year to buy scrubs and 100.00 a year for shoes, now that would be nice.
  12. by   mshellfinch
    I don't have an issue with nurses wearing colored/fun scrubs because it does sometimes liven things up some for patients. I have been complimented and asked about my "fun" scrubs on more then one occasion. My issue is with the housekeeping, unit clerks and transportation wearing scrubs. I do not beleive that anyone who is not clincal staff should be wearing scrubs.
    Our transportation team have nice polo shirts that the hospital provides, but there is one who insists on wearing scrubs. The housekeeping staff are provided with uniforms, (granted they are not the most stylish) but if the don't want to wear them then they are allowed to wear the same surgical scrubs that the surgery staff wears this I think, is a big mistake. Some of the unit clerks who have NO patient contact are wearing scrubs, I really think they should be dressing somewhat buisness casual. I think that staff should be identifiable by there uniforms, and yes buisness attire is a uniform. It's no different then a policeman or fireman. Would the secretary at the police station, don a police unirform? would the maintainance man?
    Some of the clerks dress like they are out running errands on a Saturday. Jeans and a t-shirt, sweatshirts, flip flops, sweats, low-low-low cut shirts. This irritates me to no end. What happened to dressing professionally? The unit clerks are who the public sees on entering a unit, this is there first impression of the hospital floor. But yet this dress is tolerated, and nothing is ever said. What the heck?????
    BTW: our hospital has all the RNs, LPNs, CNAs and Patient care techs, wear huge circle badges with the appropriate title on them so that patients can recognize clinical staff. It is helpful, no matter how the staff is dressed.
    Last edit by mshellfinch on Mar 13, '07
  13. by   TCRNCOB61
    Quote from neneRN
    Hospital I'm at is going to all one color for RNs..voting on colors this week; will be hunter green, ciel, or black- from the majority I've talked to, seems like its going to end up being black...yea, that's what the pt wants to see, all the nurses dressed in head to toe black, a little too morbid, I think.
    I work at this hospital also and I voted for the ciel blue. I just can't see having to wear black to work.

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