Hospital turning back clock a bit on nurses' uniforms - The State - page 3

hospital turning back clock a bit on nurses’ uniforms the state, sc - 19 hours ago ... ago, when almost all nurses were easily identifiable by standardized uniforms,” said sandy summers, executive... Read More

  1. by   S.N. Visit
    Quote from Gromit
    I've never seen a facility that allowed its cleaning staff to wear scrubs.
    I'd have to believe that they would be rare, certainly not the 'norm'.
    I will say that I truly enjoy the allowance for individuality (of course, so long as its not overboard) -we work a long hard job, its kind of nice to at least be comfortable. But I wouldn't put up much of a fight so long as they don't get it in their heads to make us wear white. White is just too easily stained -and they begin to look 'old' very quickly.
    All the cleaning staff , unit secretaries, and CNA's wear scrubs in southern Iowa, (The 6 hopsitals where I have had my clinical rotations . ) The Hospital I'm currently at, the kitchen staff and the ladies that take the money all wear scrubs too. The reason I notice this is because when I'm orientating to the hospital I don't know who is who and I end up unintentionally approaching a lot of non-nursing staff for help. It's funny, I thought it was the norm where you thought it was rare
  2. by   CHATSDALE
    there are peope who look professonal no matter what they wear and some people who always look like a used dish rag

    i've has poo, pee, betadine, thrown food on my uniform..no problem washing them out..pens were my undoing...they always waited until i had no backup in the car and they started leaking
  3. by   tiggerforhim
    At the first hospital I worked for (Magnet) the staff had all gotten together and voted on a solid colour for scrubs for the nursing staff for each floor. BTW the other staff (techs, RT, housekeeping, etc.) also all had one solid colour to wear or a uniform. As I was a float nurse wearing my dark green I was usually easily identifiable to the other staff as the float nurse (e.g. all other staff wore navy, burgundy, etc.), unless I was on a floor with dark green. As for what the patients thought, since everyone one else had a set colour for their job, it made it fairly easy to tell one from the other. The doctors were the easiest because they seemed to only ever travel in groups (this was a teaching hospital) - HA! I really liked the one scrub colour because I didn't have to worry about what to wear, just about getting them clean. The exception to the solid scrubs was Peds, of course.
  4. by   realnurselpn
    I don't have a problem wearing certain colored scrubs, but I would feel absolutely foolish wearing cartoon characters on my uniform while taking care of adult patients. I don't know how we will ever be taken seriously as professionals dressed like were going to a circus!! I don,t believe I've ever seen an MD in one of those get ups.
  5. by   SPORTsToy
    I love my scrubs I wear stylishly patterned scrub tops with color cordinating solid pants and long sleeve shirt. I like the way I look and so does my patients they always compliment my dress and they say "finally a stylish looking nurse" I am professional and proud to be an nurse. I think that if you look confident and competent then your patients will trust your professionalism. Wearing all one color does not = well groomed. That is up to the individual. The ones who come to work dirty and wearing clothes too big or wrinkled are still going to come in to work looking that way regaurdless of the color. Wearing all white does look professional to the older patients but they also think we are not qualified to do anything more than fill their water pichers. I hate the idea of loosing automnomy. It feels so degrading to punish all because of the few slovenly dressed. Such a slap in the face. As if we are not quailified to dress ourselves.
  6. by   UM Review RN
    I doubt very much if the patients I Code care what I'm wearing. Most sick patients don't even remember their own names, so I fail to see what the problem is.

    We're required to identify ourselves as caregivers. A simple, "Hi, I'm SuzyNurse, your RN tonight, and this is EllieMae, your CNA. I will help you with your pills and doctor orders; Ellie will take your blood pressure and help you to the bathroom." Presto. Patient educated.

    If you really want to improve patient morale about being in the hospital, forget messing with our scrubs and improve the hospital gown. Put Velcro tabs in strategic places so patients' bottoms aren't hanging out all the time, and they might actually stop being embarrassed enough about what they're NOT wearing to notice what I'm wearing.
  7. by   SPORTsToy
    I agree 100%. But the place I work is now going to impliment a standardized uniform and wants to begin it Nurses week! Here you go. We all want you to know how much we care that you are understaffed, over stressed (we just implimented epic 2 months ago and the hospital is under construction) and over worked by requiring one more thing from you...Buy new scrubs. Cause hey, we can't afford to give them to you. It was such a slap in the face. They should kick us while we are down there too.
  8. by   SitcomNurse
    I wear white. White denim. And if I earned it at work, I wear it to work. Had a scrub shirt with the lovely shade of blue they painted the wall in.
    But I had worked in a facility where the directorship was intentionally confusing the residents and families by having all staff wear white. There was a low Nurse ratio, and high CNA flow....Didnt know if you had just been visited by an RN, LPN or CNA. Phlebotomy was easy, she was the one with the needles!!

    Now, even in Home care, I wear white jeans, and colorful tops, and at 'the facility' I wear all white...
  9. by   jansailsea
    I'm home sick with a killer cold, woozy if I bend over, & a swollen right gland-bored to tears & thought I'd check out the BB: DRESS CODES!
    Working in an HCA hospital where uniform colors are required per profession.
    Patients CONTINUALLY think anyone wearing scrubs are NURSES.
    Given that the patient makes no distinction... how about letting the Unit Clerks wear street clothes (ours never touch patients); the CNAs be required to wear a solid color scrub set which the hospital provides & launders as a built in benefit seeing as they do hard, exhausting work for low pay; & let the people who are licensed or registered health professionals wear the scrubs of their choice with a name badge & big bold letters describing their profession, ie. RN, LPN, RT, PT, etc.
    Polo shirts with hospital logo for maintenance, janitorial, food service, & anyone else whose employment does not require them to touch the patient, non-administrative type positions.
    I do believe if you are required to wear a certain type & color of clothing, the employer is responsible for either providing a clothing allowance, laundry service and/or the uniforms.
    When a hospital says it provides discounts- they really don't amount to much. I've heard uniform shop clerks give the same "discount" to a locally owned nursing home employee.
  10. by   sleepy48
    I hate the dress code at our hospital--in the ED we must wear WHITE pants with a putrid light blue top bearing an embroidered logo we must pay for...It wouldn't be so bad if we weren't required to pay for the top, plus the logo, but we never could find laws in SC stating any different...
  11. by   sanctuary
    Remember that anything that is required by the job is tax deductible.... Unies, watches, stethescopes, sphigmomanometers, (I wrote that out just because I could) and white nylons.
    I, too had the experience of having people say thay I looked "like a real nurse," which caused by boss to forbid the wearing of whites... :uhoh21:
  12. by   Maxii
    Quote from jansailsea
    I'm home sick with a killer cold, woozy if I bend over, & a swollen right gland-bored to tears & thought I'd check out the BB: DRESS CODES!
    Working in an HCA hospital where uniform colors are required per profession.
    Patients CONTINUALLY think anyone wearing scrubs are NURSES.
    Given that the patient makes no distinction... how about letting the Unit Clerks wear street clothes (ours never touch patients); the CNAs be required to wear a solid color scrub set which the hospital provides & launders as a built in benefit seeing as they do hard, exhausting work for low pay; & let the people who are licensed or registered health professionals wear the scrubs of their choice with a name badge & big bold letters describing their profession, ie. RN, LPN, RT, PT, etc.
    Polo shirts with hospital logo for maintenance, janitorial, food service, & anyone else whose employment does not require them to touch the patient, non-administrative type positions.
    I do believe if you are required to wear a certain type & color of clothing, the employer is responsible for either providing a clothing allowance, laundry service and/or the uniforms.
    When a hospital says it provides discounts- they really don't amount to much. I've heard uniform shop clerks give the same "discount" to a locally owned nursing home employee.
    I wholeheartedly agree! As long as we wear clean, neat, unstained, well-fitting, professional looking scrubs, that should be sufficient, However the title should be LARGE AND CLEARLY STATED! Even LPN and CNA and such is confusing to a patient that has not spent much time in medical facilities. I'm an LPN and get irked every time anybody assumes I'm an RN. Everybody recognizes those initials.
  13. by   Captain Tripps
    Hello all, new guy here and I thought I would throw in my opinion on this thread. Real quick about me, after 19 yrs in EMS and 12 as a Paramedic I am starting Nursing school soon.

    It's not only the patients who get confused by everyone wearing scrubs in a hospital or nursing home setting, sometimes we don't have a clue as well. In the ER's its pretty straight forward as we know everyone but when we roll up to the floor it's a different story. With housekeeping, unit secretaries, CNA's and RN's wearing scrubs it's difficult to impossible to know who is who. It's even worse in most Nursing homes because they do not wear any kind of badges.

    To compound the problem is what I call the badge flipping phenomena, people who purposely wear their badges backwards so you don't know what level they are. This is not just a professional issue either, just yesterday during my yearly check up the person who took my demographics, VS, weight, etc was wearing her badge backwards, not just on a lanyard and accidentally flipped over but clipped to her scrubs backwards. I have no clue who or what she was, as far as I know I just gave personal and medical info to housekeeping.

    As far as wearing white in the future it doesn't bother me for tops since I have been wearing white tops for years. Pants are a different issue, seems like they would be hard to keep clean as others have already said.

    Peace,
    Tripps

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