Hospital turning back clock a bit on nurses' uniforms - The State - page 2

hospital turning back clock a bit on nurses’ uniforms the state, sc - 19 hours ago ... ago, when almost all nurses were easily identifiable by standardized uniforms,” said sandy summers, executive... Read More

  1. by   Lorie P.
    down here in the deep south only about 50 miles from fla, most of the long term care facilities and hospitals allow everyone to wear scrubs. no longer can you tell who is who unless you work at a certain place.
    it amazes me that when i go into a patient's room they will tell me oh the nurse just left, come to find out it could have been xray, cna's or house-keeping.
    several of my co-workers and i have taken this to managment but so far no luck with getting anything changed. their reply is that since nurses wear celi-blue or white, cna's kaki, house keeping navy blue etc, that there is a difference. not true!
  2. by   Gromit
    Well, you're going to have THAT no matter WHAT you do. I ALWAYS announce myself as 'your nurse' to all of my patients as soon as my shift begins. I'm a male, and I've STILL had patients refer to ME as the 'doctor' and any female cnas as 'the nurse' -no matter what I've done. I don't dress like a doctor, don't talk like one, and don't act like one. Many of the patients couldn't tell the difference (or simply just don't care to differentiate) regardless of your dress code -except that they will always associate anyone wearing a labcoat as a 'doctor' (yet many of our respiratory therapists use labcoats because of the extra pockets for their tools).
    I'm just not a fan of 'stringent uniform regs'. I don't need a piece of cloth with a certain color to gain 'respect' or even self-respect. I have the latter, and gain the former via actions.
  3. by   cvryder
    No way will you EVER get me back in white! I wore white in ICU in my young days and spent an outrageous amount on new uniforms as I was always getting betadine, charcoal, blood, or worse on mine. We once decided that the perfect color for ICU scrubs was rust-and-black plaid since it would not show the betadine or charcoal, and probably not the blood-or-worse either.
    Last edit by cvryder on Dec 12, '06 : Reason: spelling
  4. by   ewattsjt
    One place I took clinicals at had a badge system that fits behind your time card badge. The badge was mandated to be worn in the chest area. It identifies what title you hold and is large enough that most with decent vision can easily see. The cards were color coded per title as well.

    My current employer has a similar set up but only for the RNs and their degree (ASN, BSN, etc..). Other employees could easily be misidentified.
  5. by   aquaphoneRN
    Quote from ewattsjt
    One place I took clinicals at had a badge system that fits behind your time card badge. The badge was mandated to be worn in the chest area. It identifies what title you hold and is large enough that most with decent vision can easily see. The cards were color coded per title as well.
    Now THAT is a great idea!
  6. by   Gromit
    our clock-in badge is the same as our ID badge -and the colors are all the same except for the areas like L&D and Pediatrics (which also have guards at the doors to monitor who goes in and out) these name badges also have your title on them.
  7. by   ewattsjt
    I am talking in addition to your badge. Our badge is the size of a driver license. The additional badge is twice as long and only holds your title information (ie on you badge RN on the additional badge RN).
  8. by   Gromit
    Oh, well, we only have what I described (along with other cards they expect us to carry on the same clip as the badge (they have nothing to do with ID, but are little 'reminders' and floor-specific things))
  9. by   Madame Poppy Pomfrey
    There is no easy remedy to this, but I have found much confusion in the hospital that I work at as well over this uniform thing. All staff including admissions and unit secretaries are allowed to wear scrubs in addition to respiratory therapy, xray and the list goes on. The patients clearly have no idea who is the nurse and who is say the resp. therapist. And name badges don't cut it. The writing is big but not that big!! And pt's tend to forget with the badges, a uniform would make this more identifiable. I don't think the standard for a uniform should be left up to the individual hospital but perhaps to the American Nurses Association (and of course let the men have something more masculine!). Once it is to be implemented then the hospital maybe could pick up the bill for a one time only deal for current employees, but new nurses that haven't worked yet can pay for their first round of uniforms. Just a thought !
  10. by   Gennaver
    Quote from cyberkat
    The biggest problem is there's no professinal standard.

    Hospital A could have their nurses in navy while hospital B uses burgundy. Plus few hospitals enforce the regulations and people often just start wearing what they want. I've seen that happen and housekeeping will decide they want to wear what the nurses are wearing. Or radiology will say they also prefer navy or whatever color the nurse is wearing.

    I'm not a proponent of going back to white.

    I don't think this is a problem that's going to be solved. Too many nurses like to do their own thing as far as what they wear to work to set a national standard.
    Hello,

    My school uniform are Navy Blue Dickies...at clinical site A the nurses wore Navy, at clinical site B the environmental techs did! We would be mistake for either a Nurse or a janitor.

    I am not a fan of white. When I first became a CNA the first facility actually required the day nurses to wear their caps! We had to wear white hose also. Umm, no, I'd rather really not go there again. I recall feeling like I was dressed like a hotel maid, and do not see it as a professional uniform but as a 'service' uniform.
    Gen
  11. by   aquaphoneRN
    Quote from Gennaver
    Hello,

    My school uniform are Navy Blue Dickies...at clinical site A the nurses wore Navy, at clinical site B the environmental techs did! We would be mistake for either a Nurse or a janitor.

    That's very bad that you wore navy blue dickies scrubs.

    It violates the rule that nursing student uniforms are supposed to be humiliating!
  12. by   Gromit
    Quote from aquaphoneRN
    That's very bad that you wore navy blue dickies scrubs.

    It violates the rule that nursing student uniforms are supposed to be humiliating!
    aint THAT the truth! Ours were white pants (and white shoes) with a sickly kind of wine (or whine)/burgundy kind of color for the sirt (golf-shirt). Females were also expected to wear either vests or jackets -they didn't make 'em in mens sizes (the vests or jackets) so at least WE were spared THAT part. I will never forget one of our poor students who -on our very first pediatric clinical- had a cancer patient throw-up all over her white pants. I thought she was going to keel over and die right there on the spot (the student).
    Anyway, I keep ONE of those "school uniforms" in my closet as a memento of sorts. I do admit to grinning everytime I see a student wearing that getup, though. We also had to have the school patch (which is fine, but ours was very generic) on the shirt (I guess so that we couldn't use the shirt for anything else but clinicals). Golden days.
  13. by   JohnBearPA
    Quote from aquaphoneRN
    That's very bad that you wore navy blue dickies scrubs.

    It violates the rule that nursing student uniforms are supposed to be humiliating!
    LOL, our school scrubs were also burgundy, with the school logo embroidered on the tops. we looked like a bunch of spoiled grapes walking down the hall during orientations to new floors. Also, the girls had a choice of a scrub top or a snap-front baseball type top. Most thought the baseball tops were cool looking,,,,, until a pt. grabbed the front and the snaps opened, leaving them exposed. LOL.
    I hated our lab coats tho. they were fairly short, snap front, and had the wristband sleeves. Very "girly". All of us guys hated them. These were also burgundy, and had the school logo embroidered on them. We only had to wear them to go to the hosp in street clothes to get our clinical assignments tho.
    Also, remember not being allowed to be seen ANYWHERE else besides the hospital in your school scrubs? We had a snow day on a clinical day once, and a bunch of us decided to go out for breakfast, thinking no one would ever be the wiser. Well, as we're all standing in the Denny's parking lot waiting for a few stragglers to show, in pulls one of our instructors. You never saw a bunch of grapes split and duck for cover that fast before. We got caught tho, because one girl just stood there in shock watching our instructor drive directly at her, roll down the window, and inform anyone hiding within earshot that we were all "busted". Just got yelled at the next day tho, nothing major.

close