Hospital Bans Black Nurses From Caring for White Baby at Father's Request - page 3

by Not_A_Hat_Person 40,020 Views | 278 Comments

Customer service run amok. I'm a Black nurse in a very white state. During my tour of Nursing Home Hell, one resident added a note to his chart saying "Caucasian caregivers only." Oddly enough, he didn't mind when he... Read More


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    well it is a lose lose for the hospital. why is it then ok for specific genders per request. back when i lived somewhere else some people didnt want white nurses. fine by me!!!! i would dread having a pt who already hated me . more scrutiny and bs. get me out if there. they wilk not change and i would be livid to be forced to care for such pts if there were plenty of alternatives . is requesting genders also a slippery slope for hospitals to oblige since it is a protected area? ( illegal to discriminate based on gender )...... i live in a very white american area there are a few nurses only who arent white americans. have had pts yell and scream about having a non white american nurse. i was quickly brought in and asked to take said pt. pt was fine with me . the other nurse asked to switch though . what could the hospital have done? talked to pt? as if a person rude enough to make a scene over this would care. and asking them to leave would not happen for legal reasons .
    typoagain likes this.
  2. 0
    Quote from cueballRN
    For people who say they are outraged, as a male nurse there have been several occasions where the patient wanted a female nurse and did not want to have me. Was I outraged? Did I sue my hospital? No. For those outraged, is gender discrimination not as bad as racial? Or is my situation ok just because I'm a man, and its not a female being discriminated against?This woman sounds like somebody just fishing for a nice payout from their employer before retiring.
    EXACTLY. but lest we forget some views or fairy tale beliefs should be more honored than others
  3. 0
    Quote from Bortaz, RN
    I'm a white dude (and a minority by a LONG shot where I live), and I have been removed from caring for a baby twice at the request of parents. Once because I was a dude, and once because I was white and they wanted only Hispanic nurses. I neither sued nor ended up on CNN either time. Hmm. Maybe I should have. Or maybe I should have gone on about my business, not letting it bother me...just as I did.
    It may be easier for you to move on about your business, not letting it bother you, just as you did. It was only a slight inconvenience. Especially, if you can count on one hand how many times you've faced such occurrences like this example in life. I take that back, you didn't give account of all your injustices experienced, so therefore I have no right to make a statement such as I did.
  4. 6
    There's an excellent article in the UCLA Law Review that speaks to how accommodating patients' racial preference in their providers contrast to existing laws. The case in this interesting thread is apparently more common than assumed. Though this article focused on the patient-physician relationship, I think it applies to patient-nurse relationships too. With this lawsuit looming and having read the article, it appears that the current widespread practice of accommodating patient's wish stands on strong grounds after the author's legal analysis. I am interested on the outcome of this lawsuit only because if the nurse is victorious, it will be an unlikely precedent.

    The article can be found here: http://www.uclalawreview.org/pdf/60-2-3.pdf
    TiredKitten, Emergency RN, HouTx, and 3 others like this.
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    I bet it all boils down to treatment over the years. After 25 years of loyalty and experience, she may feel that she still wasn't good enough to be respected as a professional/person. the decision to keep or change assignments should rest on the nurse. He/she is smart enough to know the risks involved. There's a difference between requesting a different nurse and requesting one based off of pure racial reason. If the individual is blunt enough to make that request, facilities need to be blunt enough to escort out, sign AMA, deny request, and/or happily transfer. Here are some examples that can leave the professional nurse with dignity/autonomy. 1. Give the assigned nurse a choice to keep or switch. 2. Speak up on behalf of nurse. (He/she is the only one qualified or most qualified to take care of you/your family at this time/or out of all the nurses in this unit... But I can try to accommodate the assignment but we are required to get permission from the assigned nurse first. Would you still like to follow through with the request? I know, I know, I'm living in fantasy land .... LoL!"
  6. 6
    Dave Chappelle would have a field day with this.
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    Quote from cueballRN
    For people who say they are outraged, as a male nurse there have been several occasions where the patient wanted a female nurse and did not want to have me. Was I outraged? Did I sue my hospital? No. For those outraged, is gender discrimination not as bad as racial? Or is my situation ok just because I'm a man, and its not a female being discriminated against?

    This woman sounds like somebody just fishing for a nice payout from their employer before retiring.
    Is it gender discrimination for a woman to want a female care provider who will have intimate contact with her? While I see yours and HeartsOpenWide's points, I do think there is a difference there. Motivation DOES matter.
  8. 3
    I'm on the fence about this. I can see how this could be a sticky situation for healthcare workers (the risk of trumped up illogical, deceitful claims), but I also feel like the hospital should be willing to say it's people who are presumably competent in a given clinical setting are competent. From what I have read, it sounds as if race is the key issue, not competence. I mention competence because in my experience, people have prejudices in addition to racism, and a (seemingly) common one has to do with one's intelligence, competence or reliability.

    That being said - in this day and age, patient complaints often matter more than staff accounts of situations. When I worked the floor, a coworker I knew got written up because a particularly crazy patient (one of our frequent fliers) lied about how long it took their nurse to return to see them after they rang out and then how long it took to get their pain medicine. Yeah. Patient opinions matter so much right now to healthcare institutions. Opinions can be dependent on racial and/or other prejudices, which could hurt the hospital in that respect.
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    I'm black, yet I have cared for Neo-nazis. If given the choice, I would rather treat someone who would appreciate my skills and would have just stepped aside and let someone else deal with such a hateful individual.

    Also, you can't compare sex to race. I wouldn't feel comfortable with a guy touching my private areas, but I would be very comfortable with talking about those problems with a woman. Also, certain religions are against men and women touching each other unless they are married, and that is something that DEFINITELY needs to be respected.
    NYCGuy86, gummi bear, squidbilly, and 7 others like this.
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    Also, I have a problem with the title of thread. The hospital didn't ban black nurses from caring for the white baby, the baby's father did. Big difference.
    sixela21, HouTx, applewhitern, and 5 others like this.


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