Hospital Bans Black Nurses From Caring for White Baby at Father's Request - page 2

Customer service run amok. I'm a Black nurse in a very white state. During my tour of Nursing Home Hell, one resident added a note to his chart saying "Caucasian caregivers only." Oddly... Read More

  1. Visit  Mulan} profile page
    8
    I think the hospital acted in her best interest, though that may not have been the intent.

    Why would she want to be assigned to that baby?

    If something adverse had happened, it would be far better that she was not involved.
    typoagain, Mercnurse2, fiveofpeep, and 5 others like this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  JustBeachyNurse} profile page
    0
    Threads merged to original in nursing news forum for continuity.
  4. Visit  Bortaz, RN} profile page
    23
    I'm a white dude (and a minority by a LONG shot where I live), and I have been removed from caring for a baby twice at the request of parents. Once because I was a dude, and once because I was white and they wanted only Hispanic nurses.

    I neither sued nor ended up on CNN either time. Hmm. Maybe I should have. Or maybe I should have gone on about my business, not letting it bother me...just as I did.
    LoveMyBugs, typoagain, BaileyCoco, and 20 others like this.
  5. Visit  llg} profile page
    9
    While I haven't seen this exact situation, I have seen similar situations in which a patient asks that a particular nurse of type of nurse not be assigned to the case. In most such cases, it is in the best interests of the nurse for the hospital to comply with the patient's request. If they don't, that nurse will be vulnerable to unjust accusations and law suits (as will the hospital).

    Remember: it isn't the hospital saying that there is anything wrong with the African American nurses. It is the patient who has the prejudice. And patients have the right to refuse care. Yes. it's ugly ... and there are ugly, unjust prejudices behind it. But sometimes, it is best to avoid a fight -- rather than purposely antagonizing such a patient by denying their request.

    Another option in some cases is for the hospital to say that it cannot reasonably comply with the request due to scheduling/assignment needs and offer to help the patient find another health care facility to transfer to. Personally, that response would be my preference.
    elkpark, tsalagicara, KelRN215, and 6 others like this.
  6. Visit  applewhitern} profile page
    3
    I have known of 3 instances (in my long nursing career) where the patient's family member "claimed" that a male staff member did something inappropriate. In one instance, we worked in pediatric ICU and the baby's mother claimed the male RN touched the baby inappropriately; the other two involved male CNA's. The two CNA's had worked there for many years, but were fired. Personally, I would rather simply not take care of them because they might make up some frivolous claim and cause more grief in the long run. I live in the deeeep south, and see racism everyday, but it goes both ways. I have had black patients refuse to talk to me because I am white; I would have to get a black nurse or CNA to come into the room. I have also (recently) had patients call the black nurse a vulgar name. Yes, racism is wrong, but I know I can't fix it in one shift at the hospital, so I would rather simply not take care of the racist patients. Oh, by the way, both CNA's that were fired were black males; the male RN that wasn't fired was white. Back in the 80's, my first RN job was with 2 black LPN's. Those two ladies taught me everything I know!
  7. Visit  CapeCodMermaid} profile page
    12
    I run a skilled facility. We take care of really old people. If one of the residents doesn't want a male aide, we respect their wishes. If they don't want a black aide, we respect their wishes. It doesn't mean we agree with them or like their bigotry. In these few cases, I explain to them the best I can not to take it personally. We have many demented residents who sometimes make up stories. Why would I want to put any aide in a situation that could cause them to be falsely accused of something?Next time I'm in the hospital, I'm going to demand to not have stupid nurses
  8. Visit  gcupid} profile page
    3
    Quote from cueballRN
    For people who say they are outraged, as a male nurse there have been several occasions where the patient wanted a female nurse and did not want to have me. Was I outraged? Did I sue my hospital? No. For those outraged, is gender discrimination not as bad as racial? Or is my situation ok just because I'm a man, and its not a female being discriminated against?This woman sounds like somebody just fishing for a nice payout from their employer before retiring.
    1rst question.... Are you black? 2nd question. If you are a black man, do you affiliate yourself with being a black man?. I know in order to fish one must have patience, but surely the nurse with 25 years of service could possibly have some merit in seeking the claim. I'm pretty sure it's not her first time experiencing examples of ignorance but just maybe the accommodating of ignorance by the facility became tiresome. Everyone has their breaking point.
    gummi bear, Mercnurse2, and sixela21 like this.
  9. Visit  anotherone} profile page
    1
    well it is a lose lose for the hospital. why is it then ok for specific genders per request. back when i lived somewhere else some people didnt want white nurses. fine by me!!!! i would dread having a pt who already hated me . more scrutiny and bs. get me out if there. they wilk not change and i would be livid to be forced to care for such pts if there were plenty of alternatives . is requesting genders also a slippery slope for hospitals to oblige since it is a protected area? ( illegal to discriminate based on gender )...... i live in a very white american area there are a few nurses only who arent white americans. have had pts yell and scream about having a non white american nurse. i was quickly brought in and asked to take said pt. pt was fine with me . the other nurse asked to switch though . what could the hospital have done? talked to pt? as if a person rude enough to make a scene over this would care. and asking them to leave would not happen for legal reasons .
    typoagain likes this.
  10. Visit  anotherone} profile page
    0
    Quote from cueballRN
    For people who say they are outraged, as a male nurse there have been several occasions where the patient wanted a female nurse and did not want to have me. Was I outraged? Did I sue my hospital? No. For those outraged, is gender discrimination not as bad as racial? Or is my situation ok just because I'm a man, and its not a female being discriminated against?This woman sounds like somebody just fishing for a nice payout from their employer before retiring.
    EXACTLY. but lest we forget some views or fairy tale beliefs should be more honored than others
  11. Visit  gcupid} profile page
    0
    Quote from Bortaz, RN
    I'm a white dude (and a minority by a LONG shot where I live), and I have been removed from caring for a baby twice at the request of parents. Once because I was a dude, and once because I was white and they wanted only Hispanic nurses. I neither sued nor ended up on CNN either time. Hmm. Maybe I should have. Or maybe I should have gone on about my business, not letting it bother me...just as I did.
    It may be easier for you to move on about your business, not letting it bother you, just as you did. It was only a slight inconvenience. Especially, if you can count on one hand how many times you've faced such occurrences like this example in life. I take that back, you didn't give account of all your injustices experienced, so therefore I have no right to make a statement such as I did.
  12. Visit  juan de la cruz} profile page
    6
    There's an excellent article in the UCLA Law Review that speaks to how accommodating patients' racial preference in their providers contrast to existing laws. The case in this interesting thread is apparently more common than assumed. Though this article focused on the patient-physician relationship, I think it applies to patient-nurse relationships too. With this lawsuit looming and having read the article, it appears that the current widespread practice of accommodating patient's wish stands on strong grounds after the author's legal analysis. I am interested on the outcome of this lawsuit only because if the nurse is victorious, it will be an unlikely precedent.

    The article can be found here: http://www.uclalawreview.org/pdf/60-2-3.pdf
    TiredKitten, Emergency RN, HouTx, and 3 others like this.
  13. Visit  gcupid} profile page
    6
    I bet it all boils down to treatment over the years. After 25 years of loyalty and experience, she may feel that she still wasn't good enough to be respected as a professional/person. the decision to keep or change assignments should rest on the nurse. He/she is smart enough to know the risks involved. There's a difference between requesting a different nurse and requesting one based off of pure racial reason. If the individual is blunt enough to make that request, facilities need to be blunt enough to escort out, sign AMA, deny request, and/or happily transfer. Here are some examples that can leave the professional nurse with dignity/autonomy. 1. Give the assigned nurse a choice to keep or switch. 2. Speak up on behalf of nurse. (He/she is the only one qualified or most qualified to take care of you/your family at this time/or out of all the nurses in this unit... But I can try to accommodate the assignment but we are required to get permission from the assigned nurse first. Would you still like to follow through with the request? I know, I know, I'm living in fantasy land .... LoL!"
  14. Visit  multi10} profile page
    6
    Dave Chappelle would have a field day with this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

Top