Helene Fuld School of Nursing Closing

  1. 0
    Nursing school ends college partnership



    By WILFORD S. SHAMLIN • Courier-Post Staff • September 2, 2010

    Helene Fuld School of Nursing is dissolving its 30-year partnership with Camden County College now that health care employers prefer entry-level registered nurses with four-year bachelor's degrees rather than two-year diplomas, the nursing school's dean said this week.


    Full story here:

    Nursing school ends college partnership | courierpostonline.com | Courier-Post
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Sep 3, '10

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  2. 20 Comments...

  3. 0
    This is real sad...it's only a matter of time before other diploma programs follow. My nursing professor also said that LPNs are slowly getting phased out. Hopefully if this school partners with Rowan they will still offer evening program. Alot of students who work full time depend on evening programs and as far as I know there is no BSN program that offers evening classes.
  4. 0
    I'm suspicious. While reading the article, it becomes obvious that the nursing school got itself into trouble and it may well be the college that wanted the partnership eighty-sixed. Beyond that, it's shortsighted for any nursing school to burn a bridge with the ridiculous declaration that employers "prefer" BSNs over diploma grads, then go into negotiations with another school. Why not investigate whether your present school will is interested in starting an ADN program with transfer agreements to BSN programs, like other two year programs do?
  5. 0
    THis may be a sign of the times. With the economy like it is and an over abundance of new nurses looking for jobs, employers can afford to be choosy as in hiring a BSN over an ADN.
  6. 0
    correction to this story:
    this hospital-based program is closing.

    [color=#1111cc]helene fuld school of nursing in camden county - virtua

    helene fuld school of nursing and its antecedent schools have been educating students to become registered nurses since 1895. nursing education has evolved from a service oriented, hospital-based, preceptor model to an academic program where science and liberal arts courses provide a foundation for the nursing curriculum.
    today’s employers are requiring baccalaureate degrees for entry-level registered nurses due to changes in the healthcare arena. as a result, the board of trustees of hfsn has made a decision to close our hospital-based nursing program. the last class is expected to graduate in december, 2011. it is anticipated that a local university will establish a new baccalaureate nursing program in partnership with camden county college. this is an exciting opportunity for those individuals who aspire to become registered nurses to be educated in a bsn program in their own community. the college will continue to teach the science and liberal arts courses, while the university will teach the nursing courses in the hfsn building and grant the baccalaureate degree.
    partner camden community college is attempting to save their programs teaching science and liberal arts, then have a university complete rest of nursing course work with graduates earning bsn. rowan already has a bsn completion program in conjunction with university of medicine and dentistry of new jersey; they do not have course work setup for basic rn education level. since this would be a new program, would require nj bon approval. did not see anything in nj bon minutes online, next bon education mtg in october.

    this would be a win for rowan since no other program offering generic bsn program in area and meeting employers demands for a well educated workforce....just longer for students to achieve that dream. will make bsn grad more competitive in healthcare hiring.
  7. 0
    Quote from nrskarenrn
    correction to this story:
    this hospital-based program is closing.

    [color=#1111cc]helene fuld school of nursing in camden county - virtua


    partner camden community college is attempting to save their programs teaching science and liberal arts, then have a university complete rest of nursing course work with graduates earning bsn. rowan already has a bsn completion program in conjunction with university of medicine and dentistry of new jersey; they do not have course work setup for basic rn education level. since this would be a new program, would require nj bon approval. did not see anything in nj bon minutes online, next bon education mtg in october.

    this would be a win for rowan since no other program offering generic bsn program in area and meeting employers demands for a well educated workforce....just longer for students to achieve that dream. will make bsn grad more competitive in healthcare hiring.

    sorry for posting incorrect information/title. thank you for making the corrections.
  8. 2
    Quote from Dreaming1007
    This is real sad...it's only a matter of time before other diploma programs follow. My nursing professor also said that LPNs are slowly getting phased out. Hopefully if this school partners with Rowan they will still offer evening program. Alot of students who work full time depend on evening programs and as far as I know there is no BSN program that offers evening classes.
    Don't know about New Jersey, but diploma programs have pretty much died off in New York State. Those that didn't become ADN schools, simply closed. There is only one diploma program left in the state, and I *think* it is somewhere upstate or Westchester.

    Great as many diploma programs were, the marketplace or at least hospitals prefer RNs with a college degree, and even there the movement seems to be towards the BSN over AAS/ADN.
    RhodyGirl, RN and cherryames1949 like this.
  9. 1
    The writing on the wall is that community colleges will have partnerships with 4-year universities which teach on their campus, sometimes at a lower tuition rate. It frees up space in more concentrated campuses and gives reach to the university and local communities where nurses will work.

    It serves the students well, since they are putting in 4 years either way and won't have to go complete a RN-BSN program that takes almost 1.5 to 2 additional years to complete, which to many seems like something not worth doing.

    California employers are getting very choosy, preferring BSNs to ADNs explicitly on websites. It is well known that Stanford and VA prefer BSN students and recently Stanford put this on their website for their new grad program.
    cherryames1949 likes this.
  10. 2
    It was a three year program at one point, I graduated from it and it was not any easy walk in the park, it was a rigorous program. It was 4 long nights a week , with intensive clinical and it prepared me well. We all felt we learned enough to have earned our BS when we graduated. We graduated with diploma and Associates and we already had BS degrees in other fields , we were all 2nd degree students.
    You can not tell me that a BS degree makes someone a better nurse, they may be better educated on paper but thats it because I have seen LPNs that could work rings around BSNs that had no common sense! What makes a good nurse comes from the heart, it is what is inside him/her, the motivation to care, the empathy, the sympathy, the fortitude.
    It is shame that they are closing Helene Fuld, but there is more to the story, I am sure.
    DebanamRN and Skeletor like this.
  11. 5
    I know the larger health system in Philadelphia requires a BSN for hiring. I could never understand why a physical therapist's entry level education is a 5 year degree, yet RN's 2 years. This is coming back to haunt us, as now insurance companies and home health agencies do not see any reason to hire even an RN, when they can have LPN's do visits, or utilization review for 20.00/hr. I recently interviewed for a job that was paying 10-20/hr for medical record review to both RN's and LPN's.
    Altra, RhodyGirl, RN, AtomicWoman, and 2 others like this.


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